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Sökning: WFRF:(Fauville Geraldine) > (2010-2014)

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1.
  • Fauville, Geraldine, et al. (författare)
  • ICT tools in environmental education: reviewing two newcomers to schools
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Environmental Education Research. - 1350-4622 .- 1469-5871. ; 20:2, s. 248-283
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • United Nations of Education Scientific and Cultural Organisation’s (UNESCO’s) founding statements about environmental education (EE) in the 1970s positioned it as a multidisciplinary field of inquiry. When enacted as such, it challenges traditional ways of organising secondary school education by academic subject areas. Equally, according to UNESCO, EE requires various forms of integrated and project-based teaching and learning approaches. These can involve hands-on experimentation alongside the retrieval and critical analysis of information from diverse sources and perspectives, and with different qualities and statuses. Multidisciplinary and knowledge engagement challenges are key considerations for an EE curriculum designed to harness information and communication technologies (ICT) to support and enhance student learning, which also challenge traditional instructional priorities that for example are largely based on textbooks. This review summarises research that has sought to integrate ICT and digital tools in EE. A key finding is that while there is a rich variety of such tools and applications available, there is far less research on their fit with and implications for student learning. The review calls for further studies that will provide models of productive forms of teaching and learning that harness ICT resources, particularly in developing the goals and methodologies of EE in the twenty-first century.
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2.
  • Fauville, Geraldine, et al. (författare)
  • Impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems: educational challenges and innovations
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Marine Biology. - 0025-3162. ; 160:8, s. 1863-1874
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Population growth and social/technological developments have resulted in the buildup of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere and oceans to the extent that we now see changes in the earth's climate and ocean chemistry. Ocean acidification is one consequence of these changes, and it is known with certainty that it will continue to increase as we emit more CO2 into the atmosphere. Ocean acidification is a global issue likely to impact marine organisms, food webs and ecosystems and to be most severely experienced by the people who depend on the goods and services the ocean provides at regional and local levels. However, research is in its infancy and the available data on biological impacts are complex (e.g., species-specific response). Educating future generations on the certainties and uncertainties of the emerging science of ocean acidification and its complex consequences for marine species and ecosystems can provide insights that will help assessing the need to mitigate and/or adapt to future global change. This article aims to present different educational approaches, the different material available and highlight the future challenges of ocean acidification education for both educators and marine biologists.
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3.
  • Fauville, Geraldine, et al. (författare)
  • International student Carbon Footprint Challenge – Social media as a content and language integrated learning environment
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Eurocall 2012 Conference: CALL: using, learning, knowing, Gothenburg 22-25 August, 2012..
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Population growth and social/technological developments have resulted in the build-up of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere to the extent that we now see changes in the earth's climate. This global environmental issue requires immediate reduced CO2 emissions that must be achieve locally and globally and thus need a common language (English) to allow international collaboration among citizens. Environmental education is now clearly specified in educational standards and at the same time the view of language learning is moving towards a content and languages integrated learning (CLIL) strategy, to make English lessons more relevant and attractive for students (Eurydice, 2011). In that respect environmental and English educations can be merged to benefit both purposes and to offer a learning experience that goes beyond the school walls. Einztein, the social learning network for the education community, collaborates with the environmental project Inquiry-to-Insight (http://i2i.stanford.edu/) inviting high school students around the world to participate in the International Student Carbon Footprint Challenge (ISCFC), challenging students to learn about the environmental impact of their lifestyle choices on their carbon footprints. In the ISCFC, students use an online carbon footprint calculator to measure the amount of CO2 released by their everyday choices (food, transportation etc). Teachers then share student data with other classrooms around the globe and use Einztein to engage students in several environmental discussions online using English as the lingua. Students use Einztein to reflect upon their own carbon footprint, envision global and local solutions and share knowledge about environmental issues. For this study we focused on a specific discussion and investigated the discourse structure of students from seven different countries (USA, Croatia, Switzerland, Iceland, Greece and Bulgaria) reflecting upon their very own CO2 emission. The analysis imply common structures in students’ discourse with six different phases: (i) Expectation: students talk about their expectation of their own emission compared to the national average, (ii) Results: students communicate where their emission is actually situated compared to the national average after calculation, (iii) Reflection: students make sense of their carbon footprint in the light of the knowledge acquired by the calculator, (iv) New resolution: students reflect upon the change they are willing/able to make to decrease their footprint, (v) Share knowledge: students share pieces of environmental information or advises with the ISCFC community and finally (vi) Global dimension: students step back and see the issue as global, involving all of us rather than just their personal behaviour. The order of occurrence of the different phases seems highly conserved leading to an increase in complexity from the less elaborate phase (explanation) to the phase bringing the environmental issue in a much higher level than the individual one (global dimension). Preliminary results indicate that the students presumptions about their own impact is crucial and whether they are English natives or is not as important when it comes to developing an understanding of their own responsibilities regarding carbon footprint. Thus, in relation to a motivating content the students’ English is productive and sufficient enough for communication and collaboration.
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5.
  • Petersson, Emma, 1981-, et al. (författare)
  • Knowing nature through experimentation: Science literacy and the situatedness of knowing
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, August 30-September 3, 2011, Exeter, United Kingdom.
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The background of the present study is an interest in issues of learning and knowing across social settings. In recent years, such problems have come to be understood in terms of literacy, i.e. the ability of people to use textual and multimodal resources to understand real-world issues. The analysis reported here takes its point of departure in John Dewey’s argumentation that learning about scientific methods and inquiry can provide such a platform for learning generalized skills. Students (aged 16-17), studying the environment and climate issues, had access to a virtual lab, referred to as the acid ocean virtual lab, to conduct inquiries and experiments that concern climate change. The analysis builds on a sample of 80 students who took part in written problem-solving test as outcome measure. The students were required to design an experiment addressing a specific environmental issue. The problem was given as an individual written task before as well as after teaching/lab sessions. The results show that students increase their use of scientifically relevant terminology (‘sample’, ‘measure’ etc.) and they improve their ability to outline an experiment during the course. However, science literacy also implies realizing what a relevant interpretation of a problem is in order to be able to answer it through a scientific experiment.
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