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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Fauville Geraldine) srt2:(2015-2019)"

Sökning: WFRF:(Fauville Geraldine) > (2015-2019)

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  • Exemplary Practices in Marine Science Education - A Resource for Practitioners and Researchers
  • 2018
  • Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • This edited volume is the premier book dedicated exclusively to marine science education and improving ocean literacy, aiming to showcase exemplary practices in marine science education and educational research in this field on a global scale. It informs, inspires, and provides an intellectual forum for practitioners and researchers in this particular context. Subject areas include sections on marine science education in formal, informal and community settings. This book will be useful to marine science education practitioners (e.g. formal and informal educators) and researchers (both education and science).
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  • Fauville, Geraldine, et al. (författare)
  • Can Facebook be used to increase scientific literacy? A case study of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Facebook page and ocean literacy
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Computers and education. - 0360-1315. ; 82, s. 60-73
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The Internet provides a unique opportunity for scientists to be in direct contact with the public in order to promote citizens' scientific literacy. Recently, Internet users have started to spend most of their online time on social networking sites (SNS). Knowledge of how these SNSs work as an arena for interaction, as well as for the development of scientific literacy, is important to guide scientists' activities online, and to be able to understand how people develop knowledge of science. This was evaluated by scrutinizing the Facebook page of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and the consequences for users' ocean literacy. We investigated which practices could increase the number of users reached by a Facebook story. We also found that Facebook pages do not offer the appropriate social context to foster participation since it has only a few of the features of an arena where such practices could develop.
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  • Fauville, Geraldine, et al. (författare)
  • Development of the International Ocean Literacy Survey: measuring knowledge across the world.
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Environmental Education Research. - 1350-4622 .- 1469-5871. ; 25:2, s. 238-263
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group The Ocean Literacy movement began in the U.S. in the early 2000s, and has recently become an international effort. The focus on marine environmental issues and marine education is increasing, and yet it has been difficult to show progress of the ocean literacy movement, in part, because no widely adopted measurement tool exists. The International Ocean Literacy Survey (IOLS) aims to serve as a community-based measurement tool that allows the comparison of levels of ocean knowledge across time and location. The IOLS has already been subjected to two rounds of field testing. The results from the second testing, presented in this paper, provide evidence that the IOLS is psychometrically valid and reliable, and has a single factor structure across 17 languages and 24 countries. The analyses have also guided the construction of a third improved version that will be further tested in 2018.
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  • Fauville, Geraldine (författare)
  • Digital technologies as support for learning about the marine environment: Steps toward ocean literacy Digital technologies and ocean literacy
  • 2017
  • Doktorsavhandling (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Over the last century the ocean has been negatively impacted by human activities. In order to continue benefitting from marine services and goods, and the qualities afforded to human life through the ocean, citizens need to be informed about their relationship to the ocean and their own impact on it, that is they need to be ocean literate. Marine education is challenging, as most of the ocean is invisible to the human eye and marine processes are spread over large temporal and spatial scales. Digital technologies have the potential to support learning about the ocean as, virtually, they can take learners into the depths of the ocean and help them visualise complex interactions between different factors over time and space. This thesis consists of four studies scrutinising the role of different digital technologies for learning about marine environmental issues with an emphasis on communicative aspects, with two of the studies having a specific focus on ocean literacy. Study I is a literature review of the use of digital technologies in environmental education. Study II investigates the use of a marine research institute’s Facebook page aimed at supporting communication and learning about marine topics. Study III addresses the use of a carbon footprint calculator as an opportunity for students to reason about their greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, Study IV analyses the questions asked by students on an online platform where they engage in an asynchronous discussion with a scientist around the issues of ocean acidification. The four studies show how the use of digital technologies in environmental education can make the invisible visible, allowing engagement with and manipulation of the abstract features of the ocean. As demonstrated in my studies and as is evident from previous research in the multidisciplinary field of environmental science, digital technologies offer new means to make sense of and engage with global environmental issues. These technologies provide a field of action where users can experiment, make mistakes, get feedback and try again in ways that are different from paper-based learning activities. The findings from Studies II, III and IV also illustrate the challenges associated with these technologies, and it becomes obvious that the technical features of a tool do not determine the kind of interactions that will evolve from its use. The contexts in which a tool is used, and what the features mean to the users in situ, are key, and demonstrate the importance of studying not only the outcome of a learning practice but also the ongoing interaction between the users and the tool in a specific context. In conclusion, this thesis offers an overview of the range of impacts that digital technologies can have on the development of ocean literacy, as well as illustrating how technologies open up new ways of learning about marine environmental issues both inside and outside of school. It also provides an account of why ocean literacy is such an important skill for 21st-century citizens living in a rapidly changing world with significant challenges to the environment and our own habitats.
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  • Fauville, Geraldine (författare)
  • Questions as indicators of ocean literacy: students' online asynchronous discussion with a marine scientist
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Science Education. - 0950-0693. ; 39:16, s. 2151-2170
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • In this article, 61 high-school students learned about ocean acidification through a virtual laboratory followed by a virtual lecture and an asynchronous discussion with a marine scientist on an online platform: VoiceThread. This study focuses on the students' development of ocean literacy when prompted to ask questions to the scientist. The students' questions were thematically analysed to assess (1) the kind of reasoning that can be discerned as premises of the students' questions and (2) what possibilities for enhancing ocean literacy emerge in this instructional activity. The results show how interacting with a scientist gives the students an entry point to the world of natural sciences with its complexity, uncertainty and choices that go beyond the idealised form in which natural sciences often are presented in school. This activity offers an affordable way of bringing marine science to school by providing extensive expertise from a marine scientist. Students get a chance to mobilise their pre-existing knowledge in the field of marine science. The holistic expertise of the marine scientist allows students to explore and reason around a very wide range of ideas and aspect of natural sciences that goes beyond the range offered by the school settings.
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  • Fauville, Geraldine, et al. (författare)
  • Using collective intelligence to identify barriers to teaching 12–19 year olds about the ocean in Europe
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Marine Policy. - 0308-597X. ; 91, s. 85-96
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Since the degradation of the marine environment is strongly linked to human activities, having citizens who appreciate the ocean's influence on them and their influence on the ocean is important. Research has shown that citizens have a limited understanding of the ocean and it is this lack of ocean literacy that needs to change. This study maps the European landscape of barriers to teaching 12–19 year olds about the ocean, through the application of Collective Intelligence, a facilitation and problem solving methodology. The paper presents a meta-analysis of the 657 barriers to teaching about the ocean, highlighting how these barriers are interconnected and influence one another in a European Influence Map. The influence map shows 8 themes: Awareness and Perceived knowledge; Policies and Strategies; Engagement, formal education sector; the Ocean itself; Collaboration; Connections between humans and the ocean and the Blue Economy, having the greatest influence and impact on marine education. “Awareness and Perceived knowledge” in Stage 1, exerts the highest level of overall influence in teaching 12–19 year olds about the ocean. This map and study serves as a roadmap for policy makers to implement mobilisation actions that could mitigate the barriers to teaching about the ocean. Examples of such actions include free marine education learning resources such as e-books, virtual laboratories or hands-on experiments. Thus, supporting educators in taking on the challenge of helping our youth realise that the ocean supports life on Earth is essential for education, the marine and human well-being. •Collective Intelligence shows barriers to teaching 12–19 year-olds about the ocean.•Education stakeholder consultations ran in eight European countries.•European influence map represents the relationships among barriers.•Barriers in “Awareness and perceived knowledge” theme are the most influential.•Resources, courses and networks are options that can be used to address barriers.
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  • Hakkarainen, Kai, et al. (författare)
  • Artefacts mediating practices across time and space: Sociocultural studies of material conditions for learning and remembering.
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 2015. - 1573-4552. - 978-0-9903550-7-6 ; 2, s. 593-598
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The theme of this symposium is to explore the material conditions of learning and remembering from a sociocultural perspective. We do this in four different empirical contexts. Learning and remembering are understood as meaning-making processes that are dependent on and co-constituted by mediating tools that enable practices to extend across time and space. Our interests are precisely in what ways the “tools” people employ in these studies mediate activities of learning and remembering, and how they contribute to the organization of collective forms of knowing. We also address how we analyze the specific material features of tools that co-determine the unfolding of the activities.
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