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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Gurrea Aurelio Barricarte) srt2:(2006-2009)"

Sökning: WFRF:(Gurrea Aurelio Barricarte) > (2006-2009)

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1.
  • Rohrmann, Sabine, et al. (författare)
  • Ethanol intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Springer. - 1573-7225. ; 20:5, s. 785-794
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • To examine the association of baseline and lifetime ethanol intake with cancer of the pancreas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Included in this analysis were 478,400 subjects, of whom detailed information on the intake of alcoholic beverages at baseline and over lifetime was collected between 1992 and 2000. During a median follow-up time of 8.9 years, 555 non-endocrine pancreatic cancer cases were observed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association of ethanol intake at recruitment and average lifetime ethanol intake and pancreatic cancer adjusting for smoking, height, weight, and history of diabetes. Overall, neither ethanol intake at recruitment (relative risk (RR) = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.27 comparing 30+ g/d vs. 0.1-4.9 g/d) nor average lifetime ethanol intake (RR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.65-1.39) was associated with pancreatic cancer risk. High lifetime ethanol intake from spirits/liquor at recruitment tended to be associated with a higher risk (RR = 1.40, 95% CI 0.93-2.10 comparing 10+ g/d vs. 0.1-4.9 g/d), but no associations were observed for wine and beer consumption. These results suggest no association of alcohol consumption with the risk of pancreatic cancer.
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2.
  • Friedenreich, Christine, et al. (författare)
  • Anthropometric factors and risk of endometrial cancer : the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition.
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - 0957-5243 .- 1573-7225. ; 18:4, s. 399-413
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between anthropometry and endometrial cancer, particularly by menopausal status and exogenous hormone use subgroups. METHODS: Among 223,008 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, there were 567 incident endometrial cancer cases during 6.4 years of follow-up. The analysis was performed with Cox proportional hazards modeling. RESULTS: Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumferences and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were strongly associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer. The relative risk (RR) for obese (BMI 30- &lt; 40 kg/m(2)) compared to normal weight (BMI &lt; 25) women was 1.78, 95% CI = 1.41-2.26, and for morbidly obese women (BMI &gt; or = 40) was 3.02, 95% CI = 1.66-5.52. The RR for women with a waist circumference of &gt; or =88 cm vs. &lt;80 cm was 1.76, 95% CI = 1.42-2.19. Adult weight gain of &gt; or =20 kg compared with stable weight (+/-3 kg) increased risk independent of body weight at age 20 (RR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.11-2.77). These associations were generally stronger for postmenopausal than premenopausal women, and oral contraceptives never-users than ever-users, and much stronger among never-users of hormone replacement therapy compared to ever-users. CONCLUSION: Obesity, abdominal adiposity, and adult weight gain were strongly associated with endometrial cancer risk. These associations were particularly evident among never-users of hormone replacement therapy.</p>
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3.
  • Friedenreich, Christine, et al. (författare)
  • Anthropometric factors and risk of endometrial cancer: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Springer. - 1573-7225. ; 18:4, s. 399-413
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective To examine the association between anthropometry and endometrial cancer, particularly by menopausal status and exogenous hormone use subgroups. Methods Among 223,008 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, there were 567 incident endometrial cancer cases during 6.4 years of follow-up. The analysis was performed with Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist and hip circumferences and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were strongly associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer. The relative risk (RR) for obese (BMI 30- < 40 kg/m(2)) compared to normal weight (BMI < 25) women was 1.78, 95% CI = 1.41-2.26, and for morbidly obese women (BMI >= 40) was 3.02, 95% CI = 1.66-5.52. The RR for women with a waist circumference of >= 88 cm vs. < 80 cm was 1.76, 95% CI = 1.42-2.19. Adult weight gain of >= 20 kg compared with stable weight (+/- 3 kg) increased risk independent of body weight at age 20 (RR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.11-2.77). These associations were generally stronger for postmenopausal than premenopausal women, and oral contraceptives never-users than ever-users, and much stronger among never-users of hormone replacement therapy compared to ever-users. Conclusion Obesity, abdominal adiposity, and adult weight gain were strongly associated with endometrial cancer risk. These associations were particularly evident among never-users of hormone replacement therapy.
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4.
  • Friedenreich, Christine, et al. (författare)
  • Physical activity and risk of colon and rectal cancers: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
  • 2006
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention. - American Association for Cancer Research. - 1538-7755. ; 15:12, s. 2398-2407
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We investigated several aspects of the role of physical activity in colon and rectal cancer etiology that remain unclear in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer. This cohort of 413,044 men and women had 1,094 cases of colon and 599 cases of rectal cancer diagnosed during an average of 6.4 years of follow-up. We analyzed baseline data on occupational, household, and recreational activity to examine associations by type of activity, tumor subsite, body mass index (BMI), and energy intake. The multivariate hazard ratio for colon cancer was 0.78 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.59-1.03] among the most active participants when compared with the inactive, with evidence of a dose-response effect (P-trend = 0.04). For right-sided colon tumors, the risk was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.43-1.00) in the highest quartile of activity with evidence of a linear trend (P-trend=0.004). Active participants with a BMI under 25 had a risk of 0.63 (95% CI, 0.39-1.01) for colon cancer compared with the inactive. Finally, an interaction between BMI and activity (P-interaction=0.03) was observed for right-sided colon cancers; among moderately active and active participants with a BMI under 25, a risk of 0.38 (95% CI, 0.21-0.68) was found as compared with inactive participants with BMI > 30. No comparable decreased risks were observed for rectal cancer for any type of physical activity for any subgroup analyses or interactions considered. We found that physical activity reduced colon cancer risk, specifically for right-sided tumors and for lean participants, but not rectal cancer.
5.
  • Johnsen, Nina Fans, et al. (författare)
  • Physical activity and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0020-7136. ; 125:4, s. 902-908
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The evidence concerning the possible association between physical activity and the risk of prostate cancer is inconsistent and additional data are needed. We examined the association between risk of prostate cancer and physical activity at work and in leisure time in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In our study, including 127,923 men aged 20-97 years from 8 European countries, 2,458 cases of prostate cancer were identified during 8.5 years of followup. Using the Cox proportional hazards model, we investigated the associations between prostate cancer incidence rate and occupational activity and leisure time activity in terms of participation in sports, cycling, walking and gardening; a metabolic equivalent (MET) score based on weekly time spent on the 4 activities; and a physical activity index. MET hours per week of leisure time activity, higher score in the physical activity index, participation in any of the 4 leisure time activities, and the number of leisure time activities in which the participants were active were not associated with prostate cancer incidence. However, higher level of occupational physical activity was associated with lower risk of advanced stage prostate cancer (p(trend) = 0.024). In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis of an inverse association between advanced prostate cancer risk and occupational physical activity, but we found no support for an association between prostate cancer risk and leisure time physical activity. (C) 2009 UICC
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