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Sökning: WFRF:(Hansen Johnni) > (2015-2019)

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1.
  • Panagopoulou, Paraskevi, et al. (författare)
  • Parental age and the risk of childhood acute myeloid leukemia : results from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology. - 1877-7821 .- 1877-783X. ; 59, s. 158-165
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p><strong>Background:</strong></p><p>Parental age has been associated with several childhood cancers, albeit the evidence is still inconsistent.</p><p><strong>Aim:</strong></p><p>To examine the associations of parental age at birth with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) among children aged 0-14 years using individual-level data from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) and non-CLIC studies.</p><p><strong>Material/methods: </strong></p><p>We analyzed data of 3182 incident AML cases and 8377 controls from 17 studies [seven registry-based case-control (RCC) studies and ten questionnaire-based case-control (QCC) studies]. AML risk in association with parental age was calculated using multiple logistic regression, meta-analyses, and pooled-effect estimates. Models were stratified by age at diagnosis (infants &lt; 1 year-old vs. children 1-14 years-old) and by study design, using five-year parental age increments and controlling for sex, ethnicity, birthweight, prematurity, multiple gestation, birth order, maternal smoking and education, age at diagnosis (cases aged 1-14 years), and recruitment time period.</p><p><strong>Results:</strong></p><p>Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) derived from RCC, but not from the QCC, studies showed a higher AML risk for infants of mothers &gt;= 40-year-old (OR = 6.87; 95% CI: 2.12-22.25). There were no associations observed between any other maternal or paternal age group and AML risk for children older than one year.</p><p><strong>Conclusions:</strong></p><p>An increased risk of infant AML with advanced maternal age was found using data from RCC, but not from QCC studies; no parental age-AML associations were observed for older children.</p>
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2.
  • Pearce, Neil E, et al. (författare)
  • IARC Monographs 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives. - 0091-6765 .- 1552-9924. ; 123:6, s. 507-514
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>BACKGROUND: Recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that IARC Working Groups' failures to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans.</p><p>OBJECTIVES: The authors of this paper are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We have examined here criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. We review the history of IARC evaluations and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed.</p><p>DISCUSSION: We conclude that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various discipline and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS<strong>:</strong> The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public's health.</p>
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3.
  • Petridou, Eleni Th., et al. (författare)
  • Advanced parental age as risk factor for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia : results from studies of the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Epidemiology. - SPRINGER. - 0393-2990 .- 1573-7284. ; 33:10, s. 965-976
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Advanced parental age has been associated with adverse health effects in the offspring including childhood (0-14 years) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), as reported in our meta-analysis of published studies. We aimed to further explore the association using primary data from 16 studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Data were contributed by 11 case-control (CC) studies (7919 cases and 12,942 controls recruited via interviews) and five nested case-control (NCC) studies (8801 cases and 29,690 controls identified through record linkage of population-based health registries) with variable enrollment periods (1968-2015). Five-year paternal and maternal age increments were introduced in two meta-analyses by study design using adjusted odds ratios (OR) derived from each study. Increased paternal age was associated with greater ALL risk in the offspring (ORCC 1.05, 95% CI 1.00-1.11; ORNCC 1.04, 95% CI 1.01-1.07). A similar positive association with advanced maternal age was observed only in the NCC results (ORCC 0.99, 95% CI 0.91-1.07, heterogeneity I (2) = 58%, p = 0.002; ORNCC 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.08). The positive association between parental age and risk of ALL was most marked among children aged 1-5 years and remained unchanged following mutual adjustment for the collinear effect of the paternal and maternal age variables; analyses of the relatively small numbers of discordant paternal-maternal age pairs were not fully enlightening. Our results strengthen the evidence that advanced parental age is associated with increased childhood ALL risk; collinearity of maternal with paternal age complicates causal interpretation. Employing datasets with cytogenetic information may further elucidate involvement of each parental component and clarify underlying mechanisms.</p>
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