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Sökning: WFRF:(Hommerberg Charlotte 1960 ) > (2016)

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1.
  • Hommerberg, Charlotte, 1960-, et al. (författare)
  • It is completely ok to not be in the fighting spirit mood all the time : Metaphors and normality in Swedish cancer talk
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: 6th Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Conference, CADAAD 2016 : Book of Abstracts. - University of Catania. ; s. 118-119
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Communication in palliative cancer care contexts involving health care professionals, patients and relatives takes place in an arena that merges medical expertise, lay understanding, ‘helpers’ and ‘sufferers’. Professional and private discourses co-exist in conversations about medical as well as existential matters. Such communication often draws on metaphors – conscious metaphors aiming to render the ungraspable graspable and unconscious metaphors which are so conventionalized that they are no longer perceived as metaphors.But incurable cancer diagnoses often entail emotional hypersensitivity and therefore unpredictable responses to language use (Sandgren et al. 2010). While metaphors have the potential to be empowering, they can also give rise to feelings like fear, helplessness and guilt, which is why particular attention has been devoted to the use of violence and battle metaphors in cancer talk (Semino et al. 2015; Hawkins 1999).The overarching goal of our study Metaphors in palliative cancer care (MEPAC), a Sweden-based three- year interdisciplinary research project involving linguists and health care researchers, is to strengthen the scientific foundation for health care professionals’ understanding and use of metaphors in Swedish palliative cancer care. We investigate the use of metaphors in personal blogs written by patients as well as relatives and in interviews with patients, relatives and health care professionals, carried out within the frames of the Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care, Linnaeus University, Sweden. The project is inspired by the UK-based study Metaphor in end-of-life care (MELC) and combines qualitative metaphor analysis with quantitative analysis using corpus tools adapted for Swedish.Our presentation highlights the blog data. We focus on how the use of metaphors sheds light on what is perceived as normal when living with incurable cancer and discuss whether the use of metaphorical expressions can be related to the degree of normality that is attributed to the described phenomenon. We also offer examples from our material of possible negotiation of or resistance to such normality.
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2.
  • Hommerberg, Charlotte, 1960-, et al. (författare)
  • Metaforer i palliativ cancervård
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Palliativ vård: tidskriften för palliativ vård i Sverige. - Stockholm : Nationella rådet för palliativ vård. - 2001-841X. ; :4, s. 36-37
  • Tidskriftsartikel (populärvet., debatt m.m.)abstract
    • Metaforer är våra språkliga ”redskap” när vi talar om okända eller känsliga ämnen. Att reflektera över hur dessa används kan ge vårdpersonal ökad förståelse för hur patienter och närstående ser på och hanterar sin situation.
3.
  • Hommerberg, Charlotte, 1960-, et al. (författare)
  • Metaphors in palliative cancer care : A Sweden-based three-year interdisciplinary research project
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: RaAM 11, The 11th onference of the Association for Researching and Applying Metaphor : Metaphor in the Arts, in Media and Communication. July 1-4, 2016, Freie Universität Berlin. ; s. 229-230
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Good communication is of utmost importance in all forms of cancer care and especially so in the palliative context, where patients as well as relatives tend to be hypersensitive (Sandgren et al. 2010). To render the ungraspable graspable, met- aphors are frequently used drawing on their capacity to capture the intangible in terms of more familiar experiences. For instance, to die from cancer can be described as coming to the end of a life journey or losing a battle (Semino et al. 2015). The overarching goal of the project Metaphors in palliative cancer care (MEPAC), a Sweden-based three-year interdisciplinary research project involving linguists and health care researchers, is to strengthen the scienti c foundation for health care professionals’ understanding and use of metaphors in Swedish palliative cancer care. The project is inspired by the UK-based study Metaphor in end-of-life care (MELC). Our poster aims to give an overview of the entire project and present a snapshot of some preliminary ndings from a pilot study on blogs written by patients su ering from incurable cancer. Compared to other inter- net-based platforms such as chat rooms or discussion groups, ill-ness blogs are unique forums for self-expression. Personal blogs written by cancer patients have been observed to have the potential to contribute to nursing science’s body of knowledge and hence capability to alleviate the psychosocial burdens associated with cancer diagnosis (Heilferty 2009), which is why blogs were found particular- ly suitable for the current study. Furthermore, the Swedish blog arena stands out in international comparisons, because it is not delimited to young users but hosts a more varied range of writers (Andersson 2012). In addition to the blog data, the project also investigates interviews with patients, relatives and health care profes- sionals carried out within the frames of the Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care at Linnaeus University, Sweden. Our qualitative analysis of the blog data serves as a foundation for subsequent quantitative analyses using corpus tools in collaboration with the SWE-CLARIN initiative.
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5.
  • Hommerberg, Charlotte, 1960-, et al. (författare)
  • Rendering the ungraspable graspable : the use of metaphors in Swedish palliative cancer care
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Palliative Medicine : A Multiprofessional Journal. - Sage Publications. - 0269-2163. ; 30:6, s. NP364-NP364
  • Tidskriftsartikel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Good communication is of utmost importance in all forms of cancer care and especially so in the palliative context. To render the ungraspable graspable, metaphors are frequently used drawing on their capacity to capture the intangible in terms of more familiar experiences. For instance, to die from cancer can be described as ’coming to the end of a life journey’ or ’losing a battle’. Metaphors are largely language and culture specific. Today’s increasingly multicultural societies require particular awareness in order to achieve dignified, individualized palliative cancer care. This project aims to strengthen the scientific foundation for the use of metaphors in Swedish palliative cancer care. A secondary aim is to compare the use of metaphors in Sweden and the UK in order to reveal differences and similarities. Textual data are collected froma) internet-based blogs, where patients write about their illness-related emotions and experiences while being in palliative care, and fromb) interviews with patients, family and health care professionals, where the focus is to investigate what it means to live a dignified life in palliative care.The two sets of data are analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative linguistic methods. First, the Pragglejaz procedure, a well-established linguistic method for metaphor identification, is used in order to manually identify metaphorical expressions in the material, develop analytic categories adapted to the Swedish language data and ensure inter-rater reliability. Second, the material is approached by means of corpus linguistic methods. The combination of research methods is inspired by the UK-based MELC project. The data are currently being processed and the first results will be presented at the conference. The project is funded by The Kamprad Family Foundation, Sweden.
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6.
  • Paradis, Carita, 1953-, et al. (författare)
  • We drink with our eyes first: The web of sensory perceptions, aesthetic experiences and mixed imagery in wine reviews
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Mixing metaphor. - John Benjamins Publishing Company. - 9789027202109 ; s. 179-202
  • Bokkapitel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • This chapter analyzes the language resources that writers have at their disposal to describe their experience of the web of sensory perceptions that are evoked in the wine tasting practice. The task of the writer is to provide a mental understanding of the sensations as well as a prehension of the experiences. We show that this involves the weaving together of the senses, starting with the sight of the wine followed by a description that is iconic with the wine tasting procedure. The descriptors are systematically used cross-modally both through ontological cross-overs and through longer stretches of mixed imagery. We also show how the socio-cultural context of wine consumption correlates with the types of imagery used in wine descriptions.
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