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Sökning: WFRF:(Nam Kiwoong) > (2010)

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1.
  • Backström, Niclas, et al. (författare)
  • The recombination landscape of the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata genome
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Genome Research. - 1088-9051 .- 1549-5469. ; 20:4, s. 485-495
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Understanding the causes and consequences of variation in the rate of recombination is essential since this parameter is considered to affect levels of genetic variability, the efficacy of selection, and the design of association and linkage mapping studies. However, there is limited knowledge about the factors governing recombination rate variation. We genotyped 1920 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a multigeneration pedigree of more than 1000 zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to develop a genetic linkage map, and then we used these map data together with the recently available draft genome sequence of the zebra finch to estimate recombination rates in 1 Mb intervals across the genome. The average zebra finch recombination rate (1.5 cM/Mb) is higher than in humans, but significantly lower than in chicken. The local rates of recombination in chicken and zebra finch were only weakly correlated, demonstrating evolutionary turnover of the recombination landscape in birds. The distribution of recombination events was heavily biased toward ends of chromosomes, with a stronger telomere effect than so far seen in any organism. In fact, the recombination rate was as low as 0.1 cM/Mb in intervals up to 100 Mb long in the middle of the larger chromosomes. We found a positive correlation between recombination rate and GC content, as well as GC-rich sequence motifs. Levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) were significantly higher in regions of low recombination, showing that heterogeneity in recombination rates have left a footprint on the genomic landscape of LD in zebra finch populations.
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2.
  • Mank, Judith E, et al. (författare)
  • Faster-Z evolution is predominantly due to genetic drift.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Molecular biology and evolution. - 0737-4038 .- 1537-1719. ; 27:3, s. 661-670
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Genes linked to sex chromosomes may show different levels of functional change than autosomal genes due to different evolutionary pressures. We used whole-genome data from zebra finch-chicken orthologs to test for Faster-Z evolution, finding that Z-linked genes evolve up to 50% more rapidly than autosomal genes. We combined these divergence data with information about sex-specific expression patterns in order to determine whether the Faster-Z Effect that we observe was predominantly the result of positive selection of recessive beneficial mutations in the heterogametic sex or primarily due to genetic drift attributable to the lower effective population size of the Z chromosome compared with an autosome. The Faster-Z Effect was no more prevalent for genes expressed predominantly in females; therefore, our data indicate that the largest source of Faster-Z Evolution is the increased levels of genetic drift on the Z chromosome. This is likely a product of sexual selection acting on males, which reduces the effective population size of the Z relative to that of the autosomes. Additionally, this latter result suggests that the relative evolutionary pressures underlying Faster-Z Evolution are different from those in analogous Faster-X Evolution.
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3.
  • Mank, Judith E., et al. (författare)
  • Ontogenetic Complexity of Sexual Dimorphism and Sex-Specific Selection
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Molecular biology and evolution. - 0737-4038 .- 1537-1719. ; 27:7, s. 1570-1578
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Sex-biased gene expression is becoming an increasingly important way to study sexual selection at the molecular genetic level. However, little is known about the timing, persistence, and continuity of gene expression required in the creation of distinct male and female phenotypes, and even less about how sex-specific selection pressures shift over the life cycle. Here, we present a time-series global transcription profile for autosomal genes in male and female chicken, beginning with embryonic development and spanning to reproductive maturity, for the gonad. Overall, the amount and magnitude of sex-biased expression increased as a function of age, though sex-biased gene expression was surprisingly ephemeral, with very few genes exhibiting continuous sex bias in both embryonic and adult tissues. Despite a large predicted role of the sex chromosomes in sexual dimorphism, our study indicates that the autosomes house the majority of genes with sex-biased expression. Most interestingly, sex-specific evolutionary pressures shifted over the course of the life cycle, acting equally strongly on female-biased genes and male-biased genes but at different ages. Female-biased genes exhibited high rates of divergence late in embryonic development, shortly before arrested meiosis halts oogenesis. The level of divergence on female-biased late embryonic genes is similar to that seen in male-biased genes expressed in adult gonads, which correlates with the onset of spermatogenesis. These analyses reveal that sex-specific selection pressure varies over the life cycle as a function of male and female biology.
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4.
  • Nam, Kiwoong, et al. (författare)
  • Molecular evolution of genes in avian genomes
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Genome Biology. - 1474-760X. ; 11:6, s. R68-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Obtaining a draft genome sequence of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), the second bird genome to be sequenced, provides the necessary resource for whole-genome comparative analysis of gene sequence evolution in a non-mammalian vertebrate lineage. To analyze basic molecular evolutionary processes during avian evolution, and to contrast these with the situation in mammals, we aligned the protein-coding sequences of 8,384 1: 1 orthologs of chicken, zebra finch, a lizard and three mammalian species. Results: We found clear differences in the substitution rate at fourfold degenerate sites, being lowest in the ancestral bird lineage, intermediate in the chicken lineage and highest in the zebra finch lineage, possibly reflecting differences in generation time. We identified positively selected and/or rapidly evolving genes in avian lineages and found an over-representation of several functional classes, including anion transporter activity, calcium ion binding, cell adhesion and microtubule cytoskeleton. Conclusions: Focusing specifically on genes of neurological interest and genes differentially expressed in the unique vocal control nuclei of the songbird brain, we find a number of positively selected genes, including synaptic receptors. We found no evidence that selection for beneficial alleles is more efficient in regions of high recombination; in fact, there was a weak yet significant negative correlation between omega and recombination rate, which is in the direction predicted by the Hill-Robertson effect if slightly deleterious mutations contribute to protein evolution. These findings set the stage for studies of functional genetics of avian genes.
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5.
  • Warren, Wesley C, et al. (författare)
  • The genome of a songbird
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Nature. - 0028-0836 .- 1476-4687. ; 464:7289, s. 757-762
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The zebra finch is an important model organism in several fields with unique relevance to human neuroscience. Like other songbirds, the zebra finch communicates through learned vocalizations, an ability otherwise documented only in humans and a few other animals and lacking in the chicken-the only bird with a sequenced genome until now. Here we present a structural, functional and comparative analysis of the genome sequence of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), which is a songbird belonging to the large avian order Passeriformes. We find that the overall structures of the genomes are similar in zebra finch and chicken, but they differ in many intrachromosomal rearrangements, lineage-specific gene family expansions, the number of long-terminal-repeat-based retrotransposons, and mechanisms of sex chromosome dosage compensation. We show that song behaviour engages gene regulatory networks in the zebra finch brain, altering the expression of long non-coding RNAs, microRNAs, transcription factors and their targets. We also show evidence for rapid molecular evolution in the songbird lineage of genes that are regulated during song experience. These results indicate an active involvement of the genome in neural processes underlying vocal communication and identify potential genetic substrates for the evolution and regulation of this behaviour.
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