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Sökning: WFRF:(Selvefors Anneli 1983) > (2019)

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1.
  • Camacho-Otero, Juana, et al. (författare)
  • Circular design tools: (how) do they understand the consumer?
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of the 3rd PLATE Product Lifetimes And The Environment Conference2019. - 9783798331259
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • A move towards a circular economy will require fundamental changes in the way products and services are designed. However, tools for design in the  context of the circular economy  mostly have a narrow product or service focus without acknowledging the role of addressing behaviors and changing practices. This paper presents the results of an exploratory study investigating to what extent circular design tools consider and integrate aspects related to consumption and consumers. Using five circular tools publicly available, the research team analyzed how they address three aspects: circular consumer behaviors, consumer acceptance factors and conditions for adoption. Our analysis shows that although some of the tools acknowledge the need to gather insights around consumption and consumers, they do not address such aspects in detail. When the tools considered consumer aspects, they did so by acknowledging circular consumer behaviors. Rent and rebuy are the most frequently mentioned behaviors, while remunerate, retain and renounce are absent from the tools. Other behaviors such as receive, ritualize, regard, revalue, resell and relinquish are mentioned only once. The tools’ lack of consideration of acceptance factors and contextual conditions is slightly surprising, as most of them advocate for a human-centered approach to product development. Existing circular design tools could thus benefit from integrating concepts and frameworks from fields such as design for sustainable behavior and practice-oriented design.
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2.
  • Rexfelt, Oskar, 1975, et al. (författare)
  • A Toolkit for Designing Products and Services Fit for Circular Consumption
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of EcoDesign 2019 International Symposium. ; , s. 190-197
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • This paper introduces the Use2Use design toolkit – a set of tools that can be used to design for circular consumption. In contrast to other available circular design tools, the toolkit emphasises the importance of applying a user perspective when exploring opportunities for product circularity. It aids designers and other agents to explore user needs, identify consumption-related design challenges, and design products and services that can create enabling preconditions that make it possible, more convenient, and preferable for people to circulate products from use to use. The process to develop the tool is initially presented followed by a description of the toolkit and its five tools. The paper concludes with a discussion regarding how the proposed toolkit compares to other circular design tools and what implications it has for design practice and future research.
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3.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • A Tool for Charting Circular Consumption Journeys
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of the 19th European Roundtable for Sustainable Consumption and Production (ERSCP 2019). - 9788409168927 ; 1, s. 47-64
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Circular economy proponents often argue that products should be designed to last long, be fit for circular (re-) production flows, and be offered through circular services. While this is essential for bringing about a transition to a circular economy, changes in consumption are equally important. Transitioning from linear consumption processes (i.e. buying new products, using, and disposing of them as trash) to circular consumption processes (i.e. obtaining pre-used products, using, and passing them on to others) can however be challenging for people. Renting, borrowing, trading and other circular paths of consumption commonly require more time, effort and planning than linear paths of consumption. In order to make it more preferable for people to circulate products from consumer to consumer, products and services should be designed to make circularity convenient and desirable in everyday life. Such design processes require an in-depth understanding of people’s consumption processes. Yet, the available support to explore what circular consumption processes entail for people in everyday life is insufficient. Therefore, this paper introduces a tool for charting circular consumption journeys, which can support the development of products and services fit for circularity. This tool was developed during 2016-2019 in an iterative process in which the tool was tested by industry representatives and design students. In parallel with these activities, a team of researchers continuously developed and refined the tool based on gained insights. The tool aids designers and other agents to chart people’s consumption processes step-by-step, with a focus on people’s activities, actions, decisions and experiences. By charting circular consumption journeys, insight can be gained regarding critical hinders that may keep people from engaging in circular consumption. Moreover, it will unveil consumption-related challenges that should be addressed when designing circular products and services. Overall, the tool can aid organisations to both increase their understanding of circular consumption processes and to explore opportunities to develop products and services for a circular economy.
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4.
  • Selvefors, Anneli, 1983, et al. (författare)
  • Use to Use - a User Perspective on Product Circularity
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Journal of Cleaner Production. - 0959-6526. ; 223, s. 1014-1028
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The discussion regarding product circularity is often framed from a production and business model perspective. In this paper, people's consumption processes are taken as a new point of departure and a re-framing of product circularity from a user perspective is proposed to complement the current narrative. This user-centred perspective emphasises the importance of product exchange, which underscores that products can be transferred in tight loops from one user to another, i.e. from Use to Use. It also highlights a number of challenges and practicalities that circular paths of consumption may entail for people in everyday life, and thus points to new opportunities for designing products and services that can create enabling preconditions that make it possible, more convenient, and more preferable for people to circulate products. These design opportunities can be categorised into four design strategies that can support the development of products and services fit for circular consumption processes. How the proposed reframing compares to the current narrative is discussed and recommendations for future research are proposed.
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