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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Svalastog Anna Lydia 1966 ) srt2:(2010-2014)"

Sökning: WFRF:(Svalastog Anna Lydia 1966 ) > (2010-2014)

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1.
  • Svalastog, Anna Lydia, 1966-, et al. (författare)
  • On Teachers’ Education in Sweden, School Curriculums, and the Sámi People
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Re: Mindings : Co-Constituting Indigenous, Academic, Artistic Knowledges. - Uppsala : The Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University. - 978-91-86531-10-2 ; s. 153-171
  • Bokkapitel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>This article discusses the intersection of Teachers’ Education and the Swedish society with regards to Sámi religion, history and culture. It aims at a renewed understanding of present premises for construction of curriculums in courses on Sámi history, culture and religion. An important back drop is the Swedish State’s regulation of Teachers Education, their inclusion of indigenous peoples’ inte- rests, and the general demand for research based and reflexive academic teaching. I argue that Teachers’ Education and Swedish bookstores present research based knowledge on the Sámi People’s religion, history and culture in a weak and accidental manner. For a better understanding, I discuss Anthony Giddens’ description of society as regionalized into “back stage” and “front stage” regions structured by different rules – back stage rules being loosely structured and characterized by feelings, subjectivity and bodily activities, while front stage rules are strictly disciplined, and not characterized by personal feelings or bodily excursion. Universities and Colleges fit front stage characteristics, though Teachers’ Education, as well as Swedish bookstores, seems to be structured by back stage rules when it comes to the Sámi People. Giddens emphasizes how social encounters between people contribute to the construction of social institutions and  their organization. As such, the loose link between research based teaching and Teachers Education regarding the Sámi people, generates societal consequences. If reflexivity is a major feature of present academic life, we should expect universities to change present premises for research based new curriculums regarding Sámi history, culture and religion. The argument forwarded in this article is thus that, first of all, this situation needs to be made visible. The blind spot has to be identified and targeted. Qualified and reflexive knowledge and competence in Sámi religion, history and culture need to be integrated within all disciplines of academic education. Secondly, I argue that there is an urgent need for the (re-)establishment of the discipline of Native Studies – Indigenous Studies headed and fronted by Sámi scholars – which would have the responsibility of developing and renewing research-based curriculums on Sámi culture, history and religion. To be able to reach the full extent and depth of Sámi religion, culture and history, this discipline needs to be directed by Sámi scholars.</p>
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  • Svalastog, Anna Lydia, 1966- (författare)
  • Gene myths in public perception
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Public Understanding of Science. - 0963-6625 .- 1361-6609. ; 21:4, s. 478-494
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>In this article I examine myths in the gene science debate, and their use as a tool in analysis of popular perceptions and public opinion of genetic science and gene technology. In daily language myth means something untrue, though theories of myth present them as carriers of knowledge and truth. I understand myth as a narrative, a cultural construct that aims to describe the world, its origin, and its constituent elements. I compare scholars’ usage of myths, considering their implications. I conclude that i) As an analytical tool the concept of myth is too loosely defined, or understood through theories which leave out context, social relations and interaction. This provides limited insight about myths and myth-making in present day society. ii) An updated understanding of myths, including location/context and interaction/process would enrich analysis.</p>
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4.
  • Svalastog, Anna Lydia, 1966- (författare)
  • Making it Transparent. On Naming, Framing and Administrating Biobank Research on Native People in Sweden
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: New genetics and society (Print). - Taylor & Francis Group. - 1463-6778 .- 1469-9915. ; 32:3, s. 209-242
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Despite more than 50 years of genetic research on Sámi people in Sweden, there has been very little engagement with the ethical issues related to this research. My aim is to investigate the ethical challenges in biobank research on Sámi people, to identify ethical challenges that have been overlooked and to find ethical solutions. In my historical research inquiry of published material and interviews with people that have participated in this research, my research questions have been: How are blood samples from Sámi people collected, codified, governed and analyzed? What ethical strategies have been utilized? My main findings are: Sweden acquired biobank collections from Sámi people that are not registered or cannot be traced through the biobank register at the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. These collections entail ethical challenges concerning how the donors are identified, how the material is categorized, the regional ethical committees, governance and Sámi representation. My suggestions focus on transparency and traceability, competence and native peoples' rights and representation in biobank-related activities.</p>
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  • Svalastog, Anna Lydia, 1966-, et al. (författare)
  • You can use my name; you don't have to steal my story : A critique of anonymity in indigenous studies
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Developing World Bioethics. - 1471-8731 .- 1471-8847. ; 10:2, s. 104-110
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • <p>Our claim in this paper is that not being identified as the data source might cause harm to a person or group. Therefore, in some cases the default of anonymisation should be replaced by a careful deliberation, together with research subjects, of how to handle the issues of identification and confidentiality. Our prime example in this article is community participatory research and similar endeavours on indigenous groups. The theme, content and aim of the research, and the question of how to handle property rights and ownership of research results, as well as who should be in charge of the research process, including the process of creating anonymity, should all be answered, before anonymity is accepted.</p>
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