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Sökning: WFRF:(Willett Walter) > (2005-2009)

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1.
  • Jakobsen, Marianne U., et al. (författare)
  • Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease : a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. - : AMER SOC CLINICAL NUTRITION. - 0002-9165 .- 1938-3207. ; 89:5, s. 1425-1432
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake increases plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations; therefore, intake should be reduced to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD). Lower habitual intakes of SFAs, however, require substitution of other macronutrients to maintain energy balance. Objective: We investigated associations between energy intake from monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and carbohydrates and risk of CHD while assessing the potential effect-modifying role of sex and age. Using substitution models, our aim was to clarify whether energy from unsaturated fatty acids or carbohydrates should replace energy from SFAs to prevent CHD. Design: This was a follow-up study in which data from 11 American and European cohort studies were pooled. The outcome measure was incident CHD. Results: During 4-10 y of follow-up, 5249 coronary events and 2155 coronary deaths occurred among 344,696 persons. For a 5% lower energy intake from SFAs and a concomitant higher energy intake from PUFAs, there was a significant inverse association between PUFAs and risk of coronary events (hazard ratio: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.77, 0.97); the hazard ratio for coronary deaths was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.89). For a 5% lower energy intake from SFAs and a concomitant higher energy intake from carbohydrates, there was a modest significant direct association between carbohydrates and coronary events (hazard ratio: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.14); the hazard ratio for coronary deaths was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.13). MUFA intake was not associated with CHD. No effect modification by sex or age was found. Conclusion: The associations suggest that replacing SFAs with PUFAs rather than MUFAs or carbohydrates prevents CHD over a wide range of intakes. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;89:1425-32.
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2.
  • Koushik, Anita, et al. (författare)
  • Intake of the major carotenoids and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in a pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies
  • 2006
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Lab, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Ctr Canc Prevent, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol & Community Hlth, Minneapolis, MN USA. Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Div Prevent Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA. SUNY Buffalo, Dept Social & Prevent Med, Buffalo, NY USA. TNO, Qual Life, Dept Food & Chem Risk Anal, NL-3700 AJ Zeist, Netherlands. Karolinska Inst, Natl Inst Environm Med, Div Nutrit Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden. NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA. Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol & Surveillance Res, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA. Univ Toronto, Fac Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada. Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA. Maastricht Univ, NUTRIM, Dept Epidemiol, Maastricht, Netherlands. : WILEY. - 0020-7136 .- 1097-0215. ; 119:9, s. 2148-2154
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Carotenoids, found in fruits and vegetables, have the potential to protect against cancer because of their properties, including their functions as precursors to vitamin A and as antioxidants. We examined the associations between intakes of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin and lycopene and the risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. The primary data from 10 prospective cohort studies in North America and Europe were analyzed and then pooled. Carotenoid intakes were estimated from a validated food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline in each study. Study-specific relative risks (RR) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model and then combined using a random-effects model. Among 521,911 women, 2,012 cases of ovarian cancer occurred during a follow-up of 7-22 years across studies. The major carotenoids were not significantly associated with the risk of ovarian cancer. The pooled multivariate RRs (95% confidence intervals) were 1.00 (0.95-1.05) for a 600 mu g/day increase in alpha-carotene intake, 0.96 (0.93-1.03) for a 2,500 mu g/day increase in beta-carotene intake, 0.99 (0.97-1.02) for a 100 mu g/day increase in beta-cryptoxanthin intake, 0.98 (0.94-1.03) for a 2,500 mu g/day increase in lutein/zeaxanthin intake and 1.01 (0.97-1.05) for a 4,000 mu g/day increase in lycopene intake. These associations did not appreciably differ by study (p-values, tests for between-studies heterogeneity > 0.17). Also, the observed associations did not vary substantially by subgroups of the population or by histological type of ovarian cancer. These results suggest that consumption of the major carotenoids during adulthood does not play a major role in the incidence of ovarian cancer. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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3.
  • Lee, Jung Eun, et al. (författare)
  • Alcohol intake and renal cell cancer in a pooled analysis of 12 prospective studies
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Lab, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Natl Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden. NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Dept Hlth & Hlth Serv, NIH, Bethesda, MD USA. Univ So Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA USA. Univ So Calif, Norriss Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA USA. Maastricht Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Nutr & Toxicol Res Inst, Maastricht, Netherlands. Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Community Hlth, Minneapolis, MN USA. SUNY Buffalo, Dept Social & Prevent Med, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA. No Calif Canc Ctr, Fremont, CA USA. Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol & Surveillance Res, Atlanta, GA USA. Univ Toronto, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada. Mayo Clin, Coll Med, Dept Urol, Jacksonville, FL USA. Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA. Natl Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Hlth Promot & Chron Dis Prevent, Helsinki, Finland. : OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. - 0027-8874 .- 1460-2105. ; 99:10, s. 801-810
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background The association between alcohol intake and risk of renal cell cancer has been inconsistent in case-control studies. An inverse association between alcohol intake and risk of renal cell cancer has been suggested in a few prospective studies, but each of these studies included a small number of cases. Methods We performed a pooled analysis of 12 prospective studies that included 530469 women and 229575 men with maximum follow-up times of 7-20 years. All participants had completed a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline. Using the primary data from each study, the study-specific relative risks (RRs) for renal cell cancer were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results A total of 1430 (711 women and 719 men) cases of incident renal cell cancer were identified. The study-standardized incidence rates of renal cell cancer were 23 per 100000 person-years among nondrinkers and 15 per 100000 person-years among those who drank 15 g/day or more of alcohol. Compared with non-drinking, alcohol consumption (>= 15 g/day, equivalent to slightly more than one alcoholic drink per day) was associated with a decreased risk of renal cell cancer (pooled multivariable RR = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.60 to 0.86; P-trend <.001); statistically significant inverse trends with increasing intake were seen in both women and men. No difference by sex was observed (P-heterogeneity = .89). Associations between alcohol intake and renal cell cancer were not statistically different across alcoholic beverage type (beer versus wine versus liquor) (P = .40). Conclusion Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of renal cell cancer among both women and men in this pooled analysis.
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4.
  • Lee, Jung Eun, et al. (författare)
  • Fat, Protein, and Meat Consumption and Renal Cell Cancer Risk : A Pooled Analysis of 13 Prospective Studies
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - : OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. - 0027-8874 .- 1460-2105. ; 100:23, s. 1695-1706
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Results of several case-control studies suggest that high consumption of meat (all meat, red meat, or processed meat) is associated with an increased risk of renal cell cancer, but only a few prospective studies have examined the associations of intakes of meat, fat, and protein with renal cell cancer. We conducted a pooled analysis of 13 prospective studies that included 530 469 women and 244 483 men and had follow-up times of up to 7-20 years to examine associations between meat, fat, and protein intakes and the risk of renal cell cancer. All participants had completed a validated food frequency questionnaire at study entry. Using the primary data from each study, we calculated the study-specific relative risks (RRs) for renal cell cancer by using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled these RRs by using a random-effects model. All statistical tests were two-sided. A total of 1478 incident cases of renal cell cancer were identified (709 in women and 769 in men). We observed statistically significant positive associations or trends in pooled age-adjusted models for intakes of total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, cholesterol, total protein, and animal protein. However, these associations were attenuated and no longer statistically significant after adjusting for body mass index, fruit and vegetable intake, and alcohol intake. For example, the pooled age-adjusted RR of renal cell cancer for the highest vs the lowest quintile of intake for total fat was 1.30 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08 to 1.56; P-trend = .001) and for total protein was 1.17 (95% CI = 0.99 to 1.38; P-trend = .02). By comparison, the pooled multivariable RR for the highest vs the lowest quintile of total fat intake was 1.10 (95% CI = 0.92 to 1.32; P-trend = .31) and of total protein intake was 1.06 (95% CI = 0.89 to 1.26; P-trend = .37). Intakes of red meat, processed meat, poultry, or seafood were not associated with the risk of renal cell cancer. Intakes of fat and protein or their subtypes, red meat, processed meat, poultry, and seafood are not associated with risk of renal cell cancer.
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5.
  • Lee, Jung Eun, et al. (författare)
  • Intakes of coffee, tea, milk, soda and juice and renal cell cancer in a pooled analysis of 13 prospective studies.
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - 0020-7136 .- 1097-0215. ; 121:10, s. 2246-53
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Specific beverage intake may be associated with the risk of renal cell cancer through a diluting effect of carcinogens, alterations of hormone levels, or other changes in the renal tubular environment, but few prospective studies have examined these associations. We evaluated the associations between coffee, tea, milk, soda and fruit and vegetable juice intakes and renal cell cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 13 prospective studies (530,469 women and 244,483 men). Participants completed a validated food-frequency questionnaire at baseline. Using the primary data, the study-specific relative risks (RRs) were calculated and then pooled using a random effects model. A total of 1,478 incident renal cell cancer cases were identified during a follow-up of 7-20 years across studies. Coffee consumption was associated with a modestly lower risk of renal cell cancer (pooled multivariate RR for 3 or more 8 oz (237 ml) cups/day versus less than one 8 oz (237 ml) cup/day = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.67-1.05; p value, test for trend = 0.22). Tea consumption was also inversely associated with renal cell cancer risk (pooled multivariate RR for 1 or more 8 oz (237 ml) cups/day versus nondrinkers = 0.85; 95% CI = 0.71-1.02; pvalue, test for trend = 0.04). No clear associations were observed for milk, soda or juice. Our findings provide strong evidence that neither coffee nor tea consumption increases renal cell cancer risk. Instead, greater consumption of coffee and tea may be associated with a lower risk of renal cell cancer. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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6.
  • Mannisto, Satu, et al. (författare)
  • Dietary carotenoids and risk of colorectal cancer in a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Epidemiology. - Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Promot & Chron Dis Prevent, Helsinki 00300, Finland. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Ctr Canc Prevent, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden. NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA. Maastricht Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Maastricht, Netherlands. Mayo Clin, Coll Med, Rochester, MN USA. SUNY Buffalo, Univ Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA. Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA 02115 USA. TNO Qual Life, Zeist, Netherlands. Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Minneapolis, MN USA. Amer Canc Soc, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA. Univ Toronto, Fac Med, Toronto, ON, Canada. Albert Einstein Coll Med, Bronx, NY 10467 USA. : OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. - 0002-9262 .- 1476-6256. ; 165:3, s. 246-255
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Dietary carotenoids have been hypothesized to protect against epithelial cancers. The authors analyzed the associations between intakes of specific carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein + zeaxanthin, and lycopene) and risk of colorectal cancer using the primary data from 11 cohort studies carried out in North America and Europe. Carotenoid intakes were estimated from food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline in each study. During 6-20 years of follow-up between 1980 and 2003, 7,885 incident cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed among 702,647 participants. The authors calculated study-specific multivariate relative risks and then combined them using a random-effects model. In general, intakes of specific carotenoids were not associated with colorectal cancer risk. The pooled multivariate relative risks of colorectal cancer comparing the highest quintile of intake with the lowest ranged from 0.92 for lutein + zeaxanthin to 1.04 for lycopene; only for lutein + zeaxanthin intake was the result borderline statistically significant (95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.00). The associations observed were generally similar across studies, for both sexes, and for colon cancer and rectal cancer. These pooled data did not suggest that carotenoids play an important role in the etiology of colorectal cancer.
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8.
  • Azadbakht, Leila, et al. (författare)
  • Soy inclusion in the diet improves features of the metabolicsyndrome: a randomized crossover study in postmenopausal women
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. - 0002-9165 .- 1938-3207. ; 85:3, s. 735-741
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Little evidence exists regarding the effects of soyconsumption on the metabolic syndrome in humans.Objective: We aimed to determine the effects of soy consumptionon components of the metabolic syndrome, plasma lipids, lipoproteins,insulin resistance, and glycemic control in postmenopausalwomen with the metabolic syndrome.Design: This randomized crossover clinical trial was undertaken in42 postmenopausal women with the metabolic syndrome. Participantswere randomly assigned to consume a control diet (DietaryApproaches to Stop Hypertension, DASH), a soy-protein diet, or asoy-nut diet, each for 8 wk. Red meat in the DASH period wasreplaced by soy-protein in the soy-protein period and by soy-nut inthe soy-nut period.Results: The soy-nut regimen decreased the homeostasis model ofassessment-insulin resistance score significantly compared with thesoy-protein (difference in percentage change:7.40.8; P0.01)or control (12.9 0.9; P 0.01) diets. Consumption of soy-nutalso reduced fasting plasma glucose more significantly than did thesoy-protein (5.30.5%; P0.01) or control (5.10.6%; P0.01) diet. The soy-nut regimen decreased LDL cholesterol morethan did the soy-protein period (5.0 0.6%; P 0.01) and thecontrol (9.5 0.6%; P 0.01) diet. Soy-nut consumptionsignificantly reduced serum C-peptide concentrations comparedwith control diet (8.0 2.1; P 0.01), but consumption ofsoy-protein did not.Conclusion: Short-term soy-nut consumption improved glycemiccontrol and lipid profiles in postmenopausal women with the metabolicsyndrome.
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9.
  • McKay, James D., et al. (författare)
  • Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk: Results from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention. - : American Association for Cancer Research. - 1538-7755. ; 18:1, s. 297-305
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Vitamin D is hypothesized to lower the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation via the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR). Two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the VDR gene (VDR), rs154441.0 (BsmI), and rs2228570 (FokI), have been inconsistently associated with breast cancer risk. Increased risk has been reported for the FokIff genotype, which encodes a less transcriptionally active isoform of VDR, and reduced risk has been reported for the BsmI BB genotype, a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with a 3'-untranslated region, which may influence VDR mRNA stability. Methods: We pooled data from 6 prospective studies in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium to examine associations between these SNPs and breast cancer among >6,300 cases and 8,100 controls for each SNP using conditional logistic regression. Results: The odds ratio (OR) for the rs2228570 (FokI) ff versus FF genotype in the overall population was statistically significantly elevated [OR, 1-1.6; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.04-1.28] but was weaker once data from the cohort with previously published positive findings were removed (OR, 1.1.0; 95% CI, 0.981.24). No association was noted between rs1544410 (Bsm I) BB and breast cancer risk overall (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.89-1.09), but the BB genotype was associated with a significantly lower risk of advanced breast cancer (OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60-0.92). Conclusions: Although the evidence for independent contributions of these variants to breast cancer susceptibility remains equivocal, future large studies should integrate genetic variation in VDR with biomarkers of vitamin D status. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009;18(1):297-305)
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10.
  • Risérus, Ulf, et al. (författare)
  • Dietary fats and prevention of type 2 diabetes
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Progress in lipid research. - 0163-7827 .- 1873-2194. ; 48:1, s. 44-51
  • Forskningsöversikt (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Although type 2 diabetes is determined primarily by lifestyle and genes, dietary composition may affect both its development and complications. Dietary fat is of particular interest because fatty acids influence glucose metabolism by altering cell membrane function, enzyme activity, insulin signaling, and gene expression. This paper focuses on the prevention of type 2 diabetes and summarizes the epidemiologic literature on associations between types of dietary fat and diabetes risk. It also summarizes controlled feeding studies on the effects of dietary fats on metabolic mediators, such as insulin resistance. Taken together, the evidence suggests that replacing saturated fats and trans fatty acids with unsaturated (polyunsaturated and/or monounsaturated) fats has beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and is likely to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes. Among polyunsaturated fats, linoleic acid from the n-6 series improves insulin sensitivity. On the other hand, long-chain n-3 fatty acids do not appear to improve insulin sensitivity or glucose metabolism. In dietary practice, foods rich in vegetable oils, including non-hydrogenated margarines, nuts, and seeds, should replace foods rich in saturated fats from meats and fat-rich dairy products. Consumption of partially hydrogenated fats should be minimized. Additional controlled, long-term studies are needed to improve our knowledge on the optimal proportion of different types of fats to prevent diabetes.
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