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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Zheng Lilly S) srt2:(2009)"

Sökning: WFRF:(Zheng Lilly S) > (2009)

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1.
  • Yeager, Meredith, et al. (författare)
  • Identification of a new prostate cancer susceptibility locus on chromosome 8q24.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Nature genetics. - 1546-1718. ; 41:10, s. 1055-7
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We report a genome-wide association study in 10,286 cases and 9,135 controls of European ancestry in the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative. We identify a new association with prostate cancer risk on chromosome 8q24 (rs620861, P = 1.3 x 10(-10), heterozygote OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.10-1.24; homozygote OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.45). This defines a new locus associated with prostate cancer susceptibility on 8q24.
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2.
  • Lindstrom, Sara, et al. (författare)
  • Genetic variation in the upstream region of ERG and prostate cancer
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - : SPRINGER. - 0957-5243 .- 1573-7225. ; 20:7, s. 1173-1180
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • A considerable fraction of prostate cancers harbor a gene fusion between the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 and ERG, one of the most frequently over-expressed proto-oncogenes in prostate cancer. Here, we investigated if inherited genetic variation upstream of ERG alters prostate cancer risk and survival. We genotyped 21 haplotype tagging SNPs (htSNPs) covering 123 kb of 5'UTR DNA including exon 3 of ERG in 2,760 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,647 controls from a population-based Swedish case-control study (CAPS). Individual SNPs and haplotypes were tested for association with prostate cancer risk and survival. One haplotype-'CTCGTATG' located 100 kb upstream of ERG-was associated with lethal prostate cancer (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9, p = 0.006). Carriers of the variant 'T' allele of rs2836626 were diagnosed with higher TNM-stage (p = 0.009) and had an increased risk of prostate cancer-specific death (HR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.7, p = 0.009). However, this association did not remain statistically significant after adjusting for multiple testing. We found overall no association between ERG variation and prostate cancer risk. Genetic variation upstream of ERG may alter prostate cancer stage and ultimately prostate cancer-specific death but it is unlikely that it plays a role in prostate cancer development.
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3.
  • Wiklund, Fredrik, et al. (författare)
  • Association of Reported Prostate Cancer Risk Alleles With PSA Levels Among Men Without a Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: The Prostate. - : John Wiley and Sons Inc.. - 0270-4137 .- 1097-0045. ; 69:4, s. 419-427
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for prostate cancer screening but its levels are influenced by many non cancer-related factors. The goal of the study is to estimate the effect of genetic variants on PSA levels. METHODS. We evaluated the association of SNPs that were reported to be associated with prostate cancer risk in recent genome-wide association studies with plasma PSA levels in a Swedish study population, including 1,722 control subjects without a diagnosis of prostate cancer. RESULTS. Of the 16 SNPs analyzed in control subjects, significant associations with PSA levels (P <= 0.05) were found for six SNPs. These six SNP's had a cumulative effect on PSA levels; the mean PSA levels in men were almost twofold increased across increasing quintile of number of PSA associated alleles, P-trend = 3.4 x 10(-14). In this Swedish study population risk allele frequencies were similar among T1c case patients (cancer detected by elevated PSA levels alone) as compared to T2 and above prostate cancer case patients. CONCLUSIONS. Results from this study may have two important clinical implications. The cumulative effect of six SNPs on PSA levels suggests genetic-specific PSA cutoff values may be used to improve the discriminatory performance of this test for prostate cancer; and the dual associations of these SNPs with PSA levels and prostate cancer risk raise a concern that some of reported prostate cancer risk-associated SNPs may be confounded by the prevalent use of PSA screening. Prostate 69: 419-427, 2009. (C) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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4.
  • Zheng, S. Lilly, et al. (författare)
  • Two independent prostate cancer risk-associated Loci at 11q13
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. - 1055-9965 .- 1538-7755. ; 18:6, s. 1815-1820
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at 11q13 were recently implicated in prostate cancer risk by two genome-wide association studies and were consistently replicated in multiple study populations. To explore prostate cancer association in the regions flanking these SNPs, we genotyped 31 tagging SNPs in a approximately 110 kb region at 11q13 in a Swedish case-control study (Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden), including 2,899 cases and 1,722 controls. We found evidence of prostate cancer association for the previously implicated SNPs including rs10896449, which we termed locus 1. In addition, multiple SNPs on the centromeric side of the region, including rs12418451, were also significantly associated with prostate cancer risk (termed locus 2). The two groups of SNPs were separated by a recombination hotspot. We then evaluated these two representative SNPs in an additional approximately 4,000 cases and approximately 3,000 controls from three study populations and confirmed both loci at 11q13. In the combined allelic test of all four populations, P = 4.0 x 10(-11) for rs10896449 at locus 1 and P = 1.2 x 10(-6) for rs12418451 at locus 2, and both remained significant after adjusting for the other locus and study population. The prostate cancer association at these two 11q13 loci was unlikely confounded by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) detection bias because neither SNP was associated with PSA levels in controls. Unlike locus 1, in which no known gene is located, several putative mRNAs are in close proximity to locus 2. Additional confirmation studies at locus 2 and functional studies for both loci are needed to advance our knowledge on the etiology of prostate cancer.
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5.
  • Hsu, Fang-Chi, et al. (författare)
  • A novel prostate cancer susceptibility locus at 19q13.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer research. - 1538-7445. ; 69:7, s. 2720-3
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • A two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 150 regions across the genome that may be associated with prostate cancer (PCa) risk. We filtered these results to identify 43 independent SNPs where the frequency of the risk allele was consistently higher in cases than in controls in each of the five CGEMS study populations. Genotype information for 22 of these 43 SNPs was obtained either directly by genotyping or indirectly by imputation in our PCa GWAS of 500 cases and 500 controls selected from a population-based case-control study in Sweden [Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS)]. Two of these 22 SNPs were significantly associated with PCa risk (P<0.05). We then genotyped these two SNPs in the remaining cases (n=2,393) and controls (n=1,222) from CAPS and found that rs887391 at 19q13 was highly associated with PCa risk (P=9.4 x 10(-4)). A similar trend of association was found for this SNP in a case-control study from Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH), albeit the result was not statistically significant. Altogether, the frequency of the risk allele of rs887391 was consistently higher in cases than controls among each of seven study populations examined, with an overall P=3.2 x 10(-7) from a combined allelic test. A fine-mapping study in a 110-kb region at 19q13 among CAPS and JHH study populations revealed that rs887391 was the most strongly associated SNP in the region. Additional confirmation studies of this region are warranted.
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6.
  • Liu, Wennuan, et al. (författare)
  • Association of a germ-line copy number variation at 2p24.3 and risk for aggressive prostate cancer.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Cancer research. - 1538-7445. ; 69:6, s. 2176-9
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We searched for deletions in the germ-line genome among 498 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 494 controls from a population-based study in Sweden [CAncer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS)] using Affymetrix SNP arrays. By comparing allele intensities of approximately 500,000 SNP probes across the genome, a germ-line deletion at 2p24.3 was observed to be significantly more common in cases (12.63%) than in controls (8.28%); P = 0.028. To confirm the association, we genotyped this germ-line copy number variation (CNV) in additional subjects from CAPS and from Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH). Overall, among 4,314 cases and 2,176 controls examined, the CNV was significantly associated with prostate cancer risk [odds ratio (OR), 1.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.06-1.48; P = 0.009]. More importantly, the association was stronger for aggressive prostate cancer (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.08-1.58; P = 0.006) than for nonaggressive prostate cancer (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.98-1.45; P = 0.08). The biological effect of this germ-line CNV is unknown because no known gene resides in the deletion. Results from this study represent the first novel germ-line CNV that was identified from a genome-wide search and was significantly, but moderately, associated with prostate cancer risk. Additional confirmation of this association and functional studies are warranted.
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7.
  • Xu, Jianfeng, et al. (författare)
  • Estimation of absolute risk for prostate cancer using genetic markers and family history
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: The Prostate. - 0270-4137 .- 1097-0045. ; 69:14, s. 1565-1572
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Multiple DNA sequence variants in the form of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found to be reproducibly associated with prostate cancer (PCa) risk. METHODS: Absolute risk for PCa among men with various numbers of inherited risk alleles and family history of PCa was estimated in a population-based case-control study in Sweden (2,893 cases and 1,781 controls), and a nested case-control study from the Prostate, Lung, Colon and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial in the U.S. (1,172 cases and 1,157 controls). RESULTS: Increased number of risk alleles and positive family history were independently associated with PCa risk. Considering men with 11 risk alleles (mode) and negative family history as having baseline risk, men who had >or=14 risk alleles and positive family history had an odds ratio (OR) of 4.92 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.64-6.64] in the Swedish study. These associations were confirmed in the U.S. population. Once a man's SNP genotypes and family history are known, his absolute risk for PCa can be readily calculated and easily interpreted. For example, 55-year-old men with a family history and >or=14 risk alleles have a 52% and 41% risk of being diagnosed with PCa in the next 20 years in the Swedish and U.S. populations, respectively. In comparison, without knowledge of genotype and family history, these men had an average population absolute risk of 13%. CONCLUSION: This risk prediction model may be used to identify men at considerably elevated PCa risk who may be selected for chemoprevention.
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8.
  • Zheng, S. Lilly, et al. (författare)
  • Genetic variants and family history predict prostate cancer similar to prostate-specific antigen
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Clinical Cancer Research. - 1078-0432 .- 1557-3265. ; 15:3, s. 1105-1111
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • PURPOSE: Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the best biomarker for predicting prostate cancer, its predictive performance needs to be improved. Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial revealed the overall performance measured by the areas under curve of the receiver operating characteristic at 0.68. The goal of the present study is to assess the ability of genetic variants as a PSA-independent method to predict prostate cancer risk. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We systematically evaluated all prostate cancer risk variants that were identified from genome-wide association studies during the past year in a large population-based prostate cancer case-control study population in Sweden, including 2,893 prostate cancer patients and 1,781 men without prostate cancer. RESULTS: Twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms were independently associated with prostate cancer risk in this Swedish study population. Using a cutoff of any 11 risk alleles or family history, the sensitivity and specificity for predicting prostate cancer were 0.25 and 0.86, respectively. The overall predictive performance of prostate cancer using genetic variants, family history, and age, measured by areas under curve was 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.66), significantly improved over that of family history and age (0.61%; 95% confidence interval, 0.59-0.62; P = 2.3 x 10(-10)). CONCLUSION: The predictive performance for prostate cancer using genetic variants and family history is similar to that of PSA. The utility of genetic testing, alone and in combination with PSA levels, should be evaluated in large studies such as the European Randomized Study for Prostate Cancer trial and Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.
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