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Sökning: hsv:(SAMHÄLLSVETENSKAP) > Sophiahemmet Högskola

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1.
  • Petersson, Lena-Marie, et al. (författare)
  • Sickness absence following breast cancer surgery : a two-year follow-up cohort study
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences. - 0283-9318. ; 32:2, s. 715-724
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Rationale and aimMost women of working ages with limited breast cancer (BC) have returned to work within the first year after diagnosis. However, little is known about what is happening during this year regarding sickness absence and return to work. Also, the knowledge is very limited about the occurrence of part‐time sickness absence after BC diagnosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe occurrence, extent and length of SA during a two‐year follow‐up after BC surgery and to analyse the association between being SA and type of cancer treatment.MethodsIn this prospective cohort study, 497 women responded to questionnaires about different aspects of sickness absence at six occasions during two years after primary BC surgery (at baseline and after 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24 months). Treatment information was obtained from the National breast cancer register. Multinomial logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for likelihood of being sickness absent more than once.ResultsTwo‐thirds of the women were sickness absent at baseline; this proportion decreased, especially during the first eight months. At 24 months, 13% were sickness absent. Of all women, 27% never reported sickness absence and 14% were sickness absent at most of the six survey times. At eight months, many had shifted from full‐ to part‐time sickness absence. Women with chemotherapy and/or advanced BC surgery had higher ORs for being sickness absent at most of the follow‐ups.ConclusionsMost women returned to work within the first eight months after BC surgery and of those sickness absent after that, most had been part‐time sickness absent. Thus, it is important to differentiate between part‐ and full‐time sickness absence in future studies. Special attention should be paid to the impact of chemotherapy and type of surgery on the likelihood of being sickness absent.
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2.
  • Amsberg, Susanne, et al. (författare)
  • A cognitive behavior therapy-based intervention among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients : a randomized controlled trial
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Patient Education and Counseling. - 0738-3991. ; 77:1, s. 72-80
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT)-based intervention on HbA(1c), self-care behaviors and psychosocial factors among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients. METHODS: Ninety-four type 1 diabetes patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a control group. The intervention was based on CBT and was mainly delivered in group format, but individual sessions were also included. All subjects were provided with a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) during two 3-day periods. HbA(1c), self-care behaviors and psychosocial factors were measured up to 48 weeks. RESULTS: Significant differences were observed with respect to HbA(1c) (P<0.05), well-being (P<0.05), diabetes-related distress (P<0.01), frequency of blood glucose testing (P<0.05), avoidance of hypoglycemia (P<0.01), perceived stress (P<0.05), anxiety (P<0.05) and depression (P<0.05), all of which showed greater improvement in the intervention group compared with the control group. A significant difference (P<0.05) was registered with respect to non-severe hypoglycemia, which yielded a higher score in the intervention group. CONCLUSION: This CBT-based intervention appears to be a promising approach to diabetes self-management. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Diabetes care may benefit from applying tools commonly used in CBT. For further scientific evaluation in clinical practice, there is a need for specially educated diabetes care teams, trained in the current approach, as well as cooperation between diabetes care teams and psychologists trained in CBT.
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3.
  • Amsberg, Susanne, et al. (författare)
  • Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for adult type 1 diabetes management study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: BMJ Open. - 2044-6055. ; 8:11, s. 1-8
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • INTRODUCTION: Integrating diabetes self-management into daily life involves a range of complex challenges for affected individuals. Environmental, social, behavioural and emotional psychological factors influence the lives of those with diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a stress management group intervention based on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) among adults living with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes.METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will use a randomised controlled trial design evaluating treatment as usual (TAU) and ACT versus TAU. The stress management group intervention will be based on ACT and comprises a programme divided into seven 2-hour sessions conducted over 14 weeks. A total of 70 patients who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited over a 2-year period with follow-up after 1, 2 and 5 years.The primary outcome measure will be HbA1c. The secondary outcome measures will be the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey, the Swedish version of the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale, The Summary of Self-Care Activities, Acceptance Action Diabetes Questionnaire, Swedish Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life. The questionnaires will be administered via the internet at baseline, after sessions 4 (study week 7) and 7 (study week 14), and 6, 12 and 24 months later, then finally after 5 years. HbA1c will be measured at the same time points.Assessment of intervention effect will be performed through the analysis of covariance. An intention-to-treat approach will be used. Mixed-model repeated measures will be applied to explore effect of intervention across all time points.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study has received ethical approval (Dnr: 2016/14-31/1). The study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conferences and reports to key stakeholders.TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02914496; Pre-results.
4.
  • Amsberg, Susanne, et al. (författare)
  • Experience from a behavioural medicine intervention among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. - 0168-8227. ; 84:1, s. 76-83
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aim To describe experience from a behavioural medicine intervention among poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients, in terms of feasibility, predictors and associations of improved glycaemic control. Methods Data were collected on 94 poorly controlled adult type 1 diabetes patients who were randomised to a study evaluating the effects of a behavioural medicine intervention. Statistics covered descriptive and comparison analysis. Backward stepwise regression models were used for predictive and agreement analyses involving socio-demographic and medical factors, as well as measures of diabetes self-efficacy (DES), diabetes locus of control (DLOC), self-care activities (SDSCA), diabetes-related distress (Swe-PAID-20), fear of hypoglycaemia (HFS), well-being (WBQ), depression (HAD) and perceived stress (PSS). Results The participation rate in the study was 41% and attrition was 24%. Of those patients actually participating in the behavioural medicine intervention, 13% withdrew. From the regression models no predictors or associations of improvement in HbA1c were found. Conclusions The programme proved to be feasible in terms of design and methods. However, no clear pattern was found regarding predictors or associations of improved metabolic control as the response to the intervention. Further research in this area is called for.
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5.
  • Anderbro, Therese, et al. (författare)
  • A longitudinal study of fear of hypoglycaemia in adults with type 1 diabetes
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism. ; 1:2
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aims: To investigate fear of hypoglycaemia (FoH) longitudinally in a cross‐sectional study of adult patients with type 1 diabetes. Specifically, we investigated two subgroups of patients who over 4 years either showed a substantial increase or decrease in level of FoH to identify factors associated with changes in FoH.Methods: The Swedish version of the Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey (HFS) along with a questionnaire to assess hypoglycaemia history was sent by mail to 764 patients in 2010. The responders in 2010 (n = 469) received another set of the same two questionnaires in 2014. HbA1c, insulin regimen, weight and creatinine from 2010 and 2014 were obtained from medical records. Those with an absolute difference in HFS scores ≥ 75th percentile were included in the subgroup analyses. Statistical analyses included one‐sample t tests, chi‐square and McNemar's test.Results: The absolute difference in the HFS total score (n = 347) between 2010 and 2014 was m = ±7.6, SD ± 6. In the increased FoH group, more patients reported a high level of moderate hypoglycaemic episodes as well as impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia in 2014 compared with the decreased FoH group. There were more subjects in the increased FoH group with insulin pumps in 2014 and in 2010. In the decreased FoH group, more patients had a high frequency of daily self‐monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in 2010 and in 2014.Conclusions: Fear of hypoglycaemia is stable across time for most patients. Changes in fear level are associated with changes in hypoglycaemia frequency. Thus, asking patients about changes in hypoglycaemia experiences is of great importance.
6.
  • Anderbro, Therese, et al. (författare)
  • A longitudinal study of fear of hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes
  • 2015
  • Konferensbidrag (refereegranskat)abstract
    • AimThe aim of this study was to investigate fear of hypoglycemia (FoH) longitudinally in adult patients with type 1 diabetes. Specifically, we investigated two subgroups of patients who over four years either showed a significantly higher or significantly lower level of FoH in order to identify factors associated with changes in FoH.MethodThe Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) along with a questionnaire to assess hypoglycemia history (mild, moderate, nocturnal and severe hypoglycaemia (SH), unawareness, and daytime/nocturnal self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG)) were sent by mail to 764 patients in 2010. The responders in 2010 (n=469) received another set of the same two questionnaires in 2014. A1c, insulin regimen, weight and creatinine from 2010 and 2014 were obtained from medical records. Those with an absolute difference in HFS scores ≥ 75th percentile were included in the subgroup analyses. Statistical analyses included one-sample t-tests and chi-square.ResultsThe absolute difference in the HFS total score (n=359) between 2010 and 2014 was m=±7.6, SD ±6 (range -29 - +35). In the subgroup with increased FoH 2014 (n=45), more patients reported unawareness (76% vs 58%, Χ2= 5.05, p= 0.025) and a higher frequency of moderate hypoglycemia (52% v s 38%, Χ2= 3.93, p= 0.047) compared to 2010. In the group with decreased FoH (n=43), fewer patients reported going to the emergency department due to hypoglycemia in 2014 compared to 2010 (2% vs 14%, Χ2= 4.84, p= 0.028). There were no differences in the remaining hypoglycemia history variables or medical variables between 2010 and 2014. Between group analyzes show that in the decreased FoH group more patients have a high frequency of daily SMBG compared to the increased FoH group in 2010 (35% vs 17%, Χ2= 12.23, p= 0.00) and in 2014 (33% vs 13%, Χ2= 13.75, p= 0.00). In the increased FoH group more patients report a high level of mild (67% vs 49%,Χ2= 6.4, p= 0.011) and moderate (52% vs 23%,Χ2= 14.00, p= 0.00) hypoglycemic episodes as well as unawareness (76% vs 54%,Χ2= 11.37, p= 0.001) in 2014 compared with the decreased FoH group.DiscussionTo our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study of FoH in patients with type 1 diabetes. Our study shows that FoH is stable across time for most patients although a number of patients show increased or decreased levels of FoH. The patients whose level of FoH increased experienced a higher frequency of moderate hypoglycemic episodes and more hypoglycemic unawareness in 2014.
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7.
  • Anderbro, Therese (författare)
  • Behavior change intervention and fear of hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes
  • 2012
  • Doktorsavhandling (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Introduction: Individuals with type 1 diabetes require lifelong insulin supply as well as behavioral adjustments for good treatment result. Only a minority reach the goal for glycemic control set in order to reduce the risk of severe long-term complications. Interventions based on cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) have been proposed to improve diabetes-management, but evidence for its efficacy in adults with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes is sparse. One common barrier to optimal diabetes-management is fear of hypoglycemia (FOH), especially in those who have experienced severe hypoglycemic episodes. Thus there is a need for a valid and reliable instrument to assess individuals who are affected by FOH. It is also vital to identify factors associated with FOH in order to find targets for interventions to reduce fear.Aim: The overall aims of this thesis were to evaluate a CBT intervention for poorly controlled individuals with type 1 diabetes and to explore fear of hypoglycemia in an effort to gain deeper knowledge of possible targets for interventions to reduce FOH.Methods: All four studies applied quantitative designs. Study I was a randomized controlled trial in which a cognitive behavioral intervention was evaluated on poorly controlled adult persons with type 1 diabetes. Study II was a psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) in a survey study in adult persons with type 1 diabetes. Studies III and IV were cross-sectional survey studies employed on adults with type 1 diabetes exploring disease-specific, demographic, (studies III and IV) emotional and psychosocial factors (study IV) related to FOH.Results and conclusions: Study I: The intervention group receiving CBT showed significant improvements in HbA1c, diabetes related distress, well-being, FOH, perceived stress, anxiety and depression as well as frequency in self monitoring of blood glucose. Study II: A three- factor solution was found for the Swedish version of the HFS with the dimensions Worry, Behavior and Aloneness. Cronbach’s alpha for the total scale was 0.85 and varied between 0.63 – 0.89 in the subscales. Convergent validity was also supported with moderate correlation between Swe-HFS and Swe-PAID-20. The Swe-HFS seems to be a reliable and valid instrument to measure FOH in adults with type 1 diabetes. Study III: Seven hundred and sixty- four persons (55%) responded to the questionnaire. The HFS-Worry subscale was significantly associated with frequency of severe hypoglycemia, number of symptoms during mild hypoglycemia, gender, hypoglycemic symptoms during hyperglycemia and hypoglycemic unawareness. The HFS-Aloneness subscale was significantly associated with frequency of severe hypoglycemia, number of symptoms during mild hypoglycemia, gender, frequency of mild hypoglycemia, HbA1c, hypoglycaemic unawareness and visits to the emergency room because of severe hypoglycemia. FOH proved to be more prevalent in females. Frequency of severe hypoglycemia was identified as the most important factor associated with FOH. Study IV: A total of 469 (61%) persons responded to the questionnaire. The HFS was significantly associated with The Anxiety Sensitivity Index, the Anxiety subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Social Phobia Scale. Together with the disease-specific factors the regression model explained 39% of the variance. Support for a positive association between FOH and anxiety was present and previously identified gender differences were confirmed. Differences between the subgroups on factors associated with FOH were found that may have implications in developing interventions
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8.
  • Anderbro, Therese, et al. (författare)
  • Beliefs and Experiences of Fear of Hypoglycemia and Use of Uncooked Cornstarch before Bedtime in Persons with Type 1-Diabetes
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Open Journal of Nursing. - 2162-5336. ; 8:11
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Among persons living with type 1-diabetes hypoglycemia and fear of hypoglycemia remain limiting barriers for achieving optimal glucose control and a good quality of life. Fear of hypoglycemia has been found stable over time if not treated. Uncooked cornstarch has been found to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia but has not been studied in relation to fear of hypoglycemia. The aims of this study were to through clinical data, self-reported measures and clinical interviews explore subjects’ experience of using uncooked cornstarch before bedtime and their beliefs and experiences of fear of hypoglycemia. Methods: Mixed methods with both quantitative and qualitative data were used. Self-reported measures of hypoglycemia and fear of hypoglycemia were compared to subjects’ responses during a clinical interview. The interviews were analyzed with a functional behavior analytical approach. Results: A total of five subjects took part in the study. One subject perceived the uncooked cornstarch helpful in reducing hypoglycemia. Several subjects could recall frightening hypoglycemic episodes triggering their fear. Three out of the five subjects reported avoidance behaviors such as excessive self-monitoring of blood glucose or overeating related to fear of hypoglycemia. Conclusions: The uncooked cornstarch was found appetizing but was not perceived as having an effect on BG or hypoglycemia frequency. The clinical interviews confirmed previous research regarding experience of hypoglycemia and fear of hypoglycemia.
9.
  • Anderbro, Therese, et al. (författare)
  • Fear of hypoglycemia : relationship to hypoglycemic risk and psychological factors
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Acta Diabetologica. - 0940-5429. ; 52:3, s. 581-589
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The major aims of this study were to examine (1) the association between fear of hypoglycemia (FOH) in adults with type 1 diabetes with demographic, psychological (anxiety and depression), and disease-specific clinical factors (hypoglycemia history and unawareness, A(1c)), including severe hypoglycemia (SH), and (2) differences in patient subgroups categorized by level of FOH and risk of SH. Questionnaires were mailed to 764 patients with type 1 diabetes including the Swedish translation of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) and other psychological measures including the Perceived Stress Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Anxiety Sensitivity Index, Social Phobia Scale, and Fear of Complications Scale. A questionnaire to assess hypoglycemia history was also included and A(1c) measures were obtained from medical records. Statistical analyses included univariate approaches, multiple stepwise linear regressions, Chi-square t tests, and ANOVAs. Regressions showed that several clinical factors (SH history, frequency of nocturnal hypoglycemia, self-monitoring) were significantly associated with FOH but R (2) increased from 16.25 to 39.2 % when anxiety measures were added to the model. When patients were categorized by level of FOH (low, high) and SH risk (low, high), subgroups showed significant differences in non-diabetes-related anxiety, hypoglycemia history, self-monitoring, and glycemic control. There is a strong link between FOH and non-diabetes-related anxiety, as well as hypoglycemia history. Comparison of patient subgroups categorized according to level of FOH and SH risk demonstrated the complexity of FOH and identified important differences in psychological and clinical variables, which have implications for clinical interventions.
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10.
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