SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "swepub ;lar1:(umu);pers:(Hernell Olle);pers:(Lindquist Susanne)"

Sökning: swepub > Umeå universitet > Hernell Olle > Lindquist Susanne

  • Resultat 1-10 av 10
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
1.
  • Li, Xiaonan, et al. (författare)
  • Adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression in subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue in children
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Acta Paediatrica. - 0803-5253. ; 97:5, s. 630-5
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • AIM: To compare the expression levels of the adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator -activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SC) and omental adipose tissue (OM) in children with relation to age and anthropometric variables. METHODS: Paired biopsies (SC and OM) were obtained from 53 children (age 0.2-14 years, BMI 12.5-25.8 kg/m(2)). Adiponectin and PPARgamma mRNA levels in adipose tissue were measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS: In overweight, but not in normal weight children, the median adiponectin mRNA level was significantly lower in OM [0.51 (0.1-2.17)] compared to SC [1.29 (0.16-5.08)], (p = 0.03). Adiponectin mRNA levels were strongly associated with PPARgamma mRNA levels in both SC (r = 0.73, p < 0.001) and OM (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The lower adiponectin expression in OM relative to SC in overweight children indicates that metabolic-endocrine alterations begin already in childhood. The close association between adiponectin and PPARgamma expression supports the hypothesis this transcription factor is involved in adiponectin gene regulation.
  •  
2.
  • Andersson, Eva-Lotta, et al. (författare)
  • Bile salt-stimulated lipase and pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 : key enzymes for lipid digestion in the newborn examined using the Caco-2 cell line
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Journal of Lipid Research. - American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. - 0022-2275. ; 52:11, s. 1949-1956
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • In rodents, bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) and pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PLRP2) are the dominant lipases expressed in the exocrine pancreas in early life, when milk is the main food. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if BSSL and PLRP2 are also key enzymes in neonatal intestinal fat digestion. Using Caco-2 cells as a model for the small intestinal epithelium, purified human enzymes were incubated in the apical chamber with substrates and bile salt concentrations resembling the milieu of the small intestine of newborn infants. BSSL and PLRP2 hydrolyzed triglycerides (TG) to free fatty acids (FA) and glycerol. The cells took up the FA, which were reesterfied to TG. Together, BSSL and PLRP2 have a synergistic effect, increasing cellular uptake 4-fold compared to the sum of each lipase alone. A synergistic effect was also observed with retinyl ester as a substrate. PLRP2 hydrolyzed cholesteryl ester but not as efficiently as BSSL, and the two had an additive rather than synergistic effect. We conclude the key enzymes in intestinal fat digestion are different in newborns than later in life. Further studies are needed to fully understand this difference and its implication for designing optimal neonatal nutrition.
  •  
3.
  • Andersson, Yvonne, et al. (författare)
  • Lactoferrin is responsible for the fungistatic effect of human milk.
  • 2000
  • Ingår i: Early Human Development. - 0378-3782. ; 59:2, s. 95-105
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Human milk has recognized anti-microbial effects and it has been repeatedly shown that breast-fed infants have fewer and less severe infections than formula-fed infants. While most studies have focused on anti-bacterial and anti-viral activities few have focused on the anti-fungal effect of human milk. Dermal and other infections caused by fungi are common in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Using a liquid culturing method and Candida albicans and Rhodotorula rubra as representative fungi, we studied the anti-fungal effect of human milk and certain human milk proteins. In vitro, human milk showed potent inhibitory effect on fungal growth. Most, if not all of this effect was caused by lactoferrin via its iron-binding capacity; increasing the iron content of the incubation medium abolished the inhibitory effect. In contrast, other human milk proteins with known or suggested anti-microbial effects rather increased fungal growth. Viability test and electron microscopy revealed that the growth inhibitory effect of human milk, i.e. mediated by lactoferrin, is fungistatic rather than fungicidal.
  •  
4.
  • Andersson, Yvonne, et al. (författare)
  • Three variants of parathyroid hormone-related protein messenger RNA are expressed in human mammary gland.
  • 1997
  • Ingår i: Pediatric Research. - 0031-3998. ; 41:3, s. 380-3
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is found in a variety of tissues; particularly high levels are present in human milk. The structure of the human PTHrP gene is complex, and alternative splicing allows expression of three different variants PTHrP139, PTHrP173, and PTHrP141, respectively. To determine which of the variants are expressed in human mammary gland a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was elaborated, distinguishing the three variants. mRNA isolated from human milk cells, human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human nonlactating mammary gland cells were analyzed. The RT-PCR experiments resulted in amplification of DNA fragments corresponding to all three variants for all three cell sources tested. The nucleotide sequences of the PCR fragments were determined and verified to be identical to the reported sequences. Hence, it is concluded that human mammary gland epithelial cells express three variants of PTHrP. Whether these have different physiologic effects in the mammary gland or in the breast fed infant remain to be explored.
  •  
5.
  • Johansson, Bente B, et al. (författare)
  • Diabetes and pancreatic exocrine dysfunction due to mutations in the carboxyl-ester lipase gene (CEL-MODY) : a protein misfolding disease
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry. - Bethesda, Md. : American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. - 0021-9258. ; 286:40, s. 34593-34605
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • CEL-MODY, diabetes with pancreatic lipomatosis and exocrine dysfunction, is due to dominant frame-shift mutations in the acinar cell carboxyl-ester lipase gene (CEL). As Cel knock-out mice do not express the phenotype and the mutant protein has an altered, intrinsically disordered tandem repeat domain, we hypothesized that the disease mechanism might involve a negative effect of the mutant protein. In silico analysis showed that the pI of the tandem repeat was markedly increased from pH 3.3 in wild-type (WT) to 11.8 in mutant (MUT) human CEL. By stably over-expressing CEL-WT and CEL-MUT in HEK293 cells, we found similar glycosylation, ubiquitination, constitutive secretion and quality control of the two proteins. The CEL-MUT protein demonstrated, however, a high propensity to form aggregates found intracellularly and extracellularly. Different physico-chemical properties of the intrinsically disordered tandem repeat domains of WT and MUT proteins may contribute to different short-range and long-range interactions with the globular core domain and other macromolecules, including cell membranes. Thus, we propose that CEL-MODY is a protein misfolding disease caused by a negative gain-of-function effect of the mutant proteins in pancreatic tissues.
  •  
6.
  • Li, Xiaonan, et al. (författare)
  • Bile Salt-Stimulated Lipase and Pancreatic Lipase-Related Protein 2 Are the Dominating Lipases in Neonatal Fat Digestion in Mice and Rats.
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: Pediatr Res. - 0031-3998.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • During infancy, the basic conditions for digestion of dietary fat differ from later in life. The bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) is an enzyme expressed in the exocrine pancreas and in some species (including human) also in the lactating mammary gland and secreted with the milk. The aim of this study was to compare the ontogeny of four pancreatic lipases [BSSL, pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PL), pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PLRP2), and phospholipase A2 (PLA2)] in one species that supplies BSSL with milk (the mouse) and one that does not (the rat). We followed expression of the four pancreatic lipases from postnatal d 1 until after weaning in both species. We found that BSSL and PLRP2, two lipases with broad substrate specificity, dominated. It was not until weaning that significant expression of PL and PLA2 were induced. Thus, BSSL and PLRP2 seem to be responsible for fat digestion as long as milk is the main food. Moreover, the early temporal pattern of BSSL expression differed between species. We speculate that the milk-borne BSSL is able to compensate for a slower ontogeny of pancreatic BSSL expression in the mouse.PMID: 17805199 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  •  
7.
  • Lindquist, Susanne, et al. (författare)
  • Bile salt-stimulated lipase plays an unexpected role in arthritis development in rodents
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: PLoS ONE. - San Fransisco, USA : Public Library Science. - 1932-6203. ; 7:10, s. e47006
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective: The present study aimed to explore the hypothesis that bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), in addition to being a key enzyme in dietary fat digestion during early infancy, plays an important role in inflammation, notably arthritis. Methods: Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) in rodents are commonly used experimental models that reproduce many of the pathogenic mechanisms of human rheumatoid arthritis, i.e. increased cellular infiltration, synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, and erosion of cartilage and bone in the distal joints. We used the CIA model to compare the response in BSSL wild type (BSSL-WT) mice with BSSL-deficient 'knock-out' (BSSL-KO) and BSSL-heterozygous (BSSL-HET) littermates. We also investigated if intraperitoneal injection of BSSL-neutralizing antibodies affected the development or severity of CIA and PIA in mice and rats, respectively. Results: In two consecutive studies, we found that BSSL-KO male mice, in contrast to BSSL-WT littermates, were significantly protected from developing arthritis. We also found that BSSL-HET mice were less prone to develop disease compared to BSSL-WT mice, but not as resistant as BSSL-KO mice, suggesting a gene-dose effect. Moreover, we found that BSSL-neutralizing antibody injection reduced both the incidence and severity of CIA and PIA in rodents. Conclusion: Our data strongly support BSSL as a key player in the inflammatory process, at least in rodents. It also suggests the possibility that BSSL-neutralizing agents could serve as a therapeutic model to reduce the inflammatory response in humans.
  •  
8.
  • Lindquist, Susanne, et al. (författare)
  • Lipid digestion and absorption in early life : an update.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Current opinion in clinical nutrition and metabolic care. - 1363-1950. ; 13:3, s. 314-20
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To highlight our understanding of digestion and absorption of dietary lipids in newborn infants, and specifically how these processes differ from those in children and adults. RECENT FINDINGS: The intestinal concentration of pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PTL) and bile salts is lower in newborns compared to later in life. Instead the PTL-related protein 2 and bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL) are the key enzymes secreted from pancreas, which in concerted action with gastric lipase operate to achieve efficient fat absorption during infancy. BSSL is also present in human milk which affects fat absorption and growth in breast-fed preterm infants. Under conditions of low luminal bile salt concentrations fat absorption is likely to occur from liquid crystalline product phases, which may result in absorption from an extended part of the small intestinal mucosal surfaces compared to adults. Chylomicron assembly and secretion also seem to adapt to the specific situation of the newborn. SUMMARY: Both fat digestion and product absorption are different in newborn infants compared to adults; other lipases are used for digestion and different physical-chemical phases may be used for product absorption. Why these differences occur is still an unsolved question of considerable importance to neonatal nutrition.
  •  
9.
  • Naarding, Marloes A, et al. (författare)
  • Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells.
  • 2006
  • Ingår i: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. - 0066-4804. ; 50:10, s. 3367-74
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs and a subset of B cells. More specifically, the interaction of the gp120 envelope protein of HIV-1 with DC-SIGN can facilitate the transfer of virus to CD4+ T lymphocytes in trans and enhance infection. We have previously demonstrated that a multimeric LeX component in human milk binds to DC-SIGN, preventing HIV-1 from interacting with this receptor. Biochemical analysis reveals that the compound is heat resistant, trypsin sensitive, and larger than 100 kDa, indicating a specific glycoprotein as the inhibitory compound. By testing human milk from three different mothers, we found the levels of DC-SIGN binding and viral inhibition to vary between samples. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization analysis, we identified bile salt-stimulated lipase (BSSL), a Lewis X (LeX)-containing glycoprotein found in human milk, to be the major variant protein between the samples. BSSL isolated from human milk bound to DC-SIGN and inhibited the transfer of HIV-1 to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Two BSSL isoforms isolated from the same human milk sample showed differences in DC-SIGN binding, illustrating that alterations in the BSSL forms explain the differences observed. These results indicate that variations in BSSL lead to alterations in LeX expression by the protein, which subsequently alters the DC-SIGN binding capacity and the inhibitory effect on HIV-1 transfer. Identifying the specific molecular interaction between the different forms may aid in the future design of antimicrobial agents.
  •  
10.
  •  
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 1-10 av 10
 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy