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Träfflista för sökning "swepub ;lar1:(umu);pers:(Riboli Elio);pers:(Krogh Vittorio);pers:(Lenner Per);pers:(Panico Salvatore)"

Sökning: swepub > Umeå universitet > Riboli Elio > Krogh Vittorio > Lenner Per > Panico Salvatore

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1.
  • Pala, Valeria, et al. (författare)
  • Meat, eggs, dairy products, and risk of breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition. - American Society for Clinical Nutrition. - 0002-9165. ; 90:3, s. 602-612
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: A Western diet is associated with breast cancer risk. Objective: We investigated the relation of meat, egg, and dairy product consumption with breast cancer risk by using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Design: Between 1992 and 2003, information on diet was collected from 319,826 women. Disease hazard ratios were estimated with multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results: Breast cancer cases (n = 7119) were observed during 8.8 y (median) of follow-up. No consistent association was found between breast cancer risk and the consumption of any of the food groups under study, when analyzed by both categorical and continuous exposure variable models. High processed meat consumption was associated with a modest increase in breast cancer risk in the categorical model (hazard ratio: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.20; highest compared with lowest quintile: P for trend = 0.07). Subgroup analyses suggested an association with butter consumption, limited to premenopausal women (hazard ratio: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.53; highest compared with lowest quintile: P for trend = 0.21). Between-country heterogeneity was found for red meat (Q statistic = 18.03; P = 0.05) and was significantly explained (P = 0.023) by the proportion of meat cooked at high temperature. Conclusions: We have not consistently identified intakes of meat, eggs, or dairy products as risk factors for breast cancer. Future studies should investigate the possible role of high-temperature cooking in the relation of red meat intake with breast cancer risk. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;90:602-12.
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2.
  • Sieri, Sabina, et al. (författare)
  • Dietary fat and breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION. - AMER SOC CLINICAL NUTRITION. - 0002-9165. ; 88:5, s. 1304-1312
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Epidemiologic studies have produced conflicting results with respect to an association of dietary fat with breast cancer. Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between fat consumption and breast cancer. Design: We prospectively investigated fat consumption in a large (n = 319 826), geographically and culturally heterogeneous cohort of European women enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition who completed a dietary questionnaire. After a mean of 8.8 y of follow-up, 7119 women developed breast cancer. Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age and center and adjusted for energy intake and confounders, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for breast cancer. Results: An association between high saturated fat intake and greater breast cancer risk was found HR = 1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.27; P for trend = 0.038) for the highest quintile of saturated fat intake compared with the lowest quintile: 1.02 (1.00, 1.04) for a 20% increase in saturated fat consumption (continuous variable). No significant association of breast cancer with total, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat was found, although trends were for a direct association of risk with monounsaturated fat and an inverse association with polyunsaturated fat. In menopausal women, the positive association with saturated fat was confined to nonusers of hormone therapy at baseline 1.21 (0.99, 1.48) for the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile; P for trend = 0.044; and 1.03 (1.00, 1.07) for a 20% increase in saturated fat as a continuous variable. Conclusions: Evidence indicates a weak positive association between saturated fat intake and breast cancer risk. This association was more pronounced for postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy. Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 88: 1304-12.
3.
  • Campa, Daniele, et al. (författare)
  • The INSIG2 rs7566605 polymorphism is not associated with body mass index and breast cancer risk
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: BMC Cancer. - BioMed Central. - 1471-2407. ; 10, s. 563
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: The single nucleotide polymorphism rs7566605, located in the promoter of the INSIG2 gene, has been the subject of a strong scientific effort aimed to elucidate its possible association with body mass index (BMI). The first report showing that rs7566605 could be associated with body fatness was a genome-wide association study (GWAS) which used BMI as the primary phenotype. Many follow-up studies sought to validate the association of rs7566605 with various markers of obesity, with several publications reporting inconsistent findings. BMI is considered to be one of the measures of choice to evaluate body fatness and there is evidence that body fatness is related with an increased risk of breast cancer (BC).METHODS: we tested in a large-scale association study (3,973 women, including 1,269 invasive BC cases and 2,194 controls), nested within the EPIC cohort, the involvement of rs7566605 as predictor of BMI and BC risk.RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: In this study we were not able to find any statistically significant association between this SNP and BMI, nor did we find any significant association between the SNP and an increased risk of breast cancer overall and by subgroups of age, or menopausal status.
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