SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "swepub ;lar1:(umu);pers:(Riboli Elio);spr:eng;pers:(Trichopoulou Antonia);pers:(Manjer Jonas);pers:(Gallo Valentina);pers:(Dahm Christina C)"

Sökning: swepub > Umeå universitet > Riboli Elio > Engelska > Trichopoulou Antonia > Manjer Jonas > Gallo Valentina > Dahm Christina C

  • Resultat 1-3 av 3
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
1.
  • Michaud, Dominique S., et al. (författare)
  • Anthropometric Measures, Physical Activity, and Risk of Glioma and Meningioma in a Large Prospective Cohort Study
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Cancer Prevention Research. - American Association for Cancer Research. - 1940-6207. ; 4:9, s. 1385-1392
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Body fatness has been associated with increased risk of a number of hormone-dependent cancers. Recent studies suggest that body mass index (BMI) may be related to meningiomas, which are more common in women than men, and for which estrogens are believed to play a role. Using data from a large European propective cohort, 203 incident cases of meningioma and 340 cases of glioma were included in the analysis for measures of body fat, height, and physical activity among 380,775 participants. All analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazards model and controlling for age, sex, country, and education. A 71% increase in risk of meningioma was observed among men and women in the top quartile of waist circumference (HR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.08-2.73, P-trend = 0.01). A positive association was also observed for BMI and meningioma (HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 0.98-2.23, for BMI >= 30 compared with a BMI of 20-24.9, P-trend = 0.05). An association with height and meningioma was also suggestive (HR = 1.24, 95% 0.96-1.51, for each 10 cm increase). In contrast, no associations were observed for height and different measures of body fat and risk of glioma. Physical activity was not related to either type of brain tumors. Results from this study support an increase in risk of meningioma with higher body fatness among both men and women. No association was observed between anthropometric measures and risk of glioma. Cancer Prev Res; 4(9); 1385-92. (C) 2011 AACR.
  •  
2.
  • Michaud, Dominique S, et al. (författare)
  • Coffee and tea intake and risk of brain tumors in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort study.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: American journal of clinical nutrition. - American Society for Clinical Nutrition. - 1938-3207. ; 92:5, s. 1145-1150
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: In a recent US cohort study, total coffee and tea consumption was inversely associated with risk of glioma, and experimental studies showed that caffeine can slow the invasive growth of glioblastoma. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the relation between coffee and tea intake and the risk of glioma and meningioma in a large European cohort study, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN: Data on coffee and tea intake were collected from men and women recruited into the EPIC cohort study. Over an average of 8.5 y of follow-up, 343 cases of glioma and 245 cases of meningioma were newly diagnosed in 9 countries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the relation between coffee and tea and brain tumors. RESULTS: We observed no associations between coffee, tea, or combined coffee and tea consumption and risk of either type of brain tumor when using quantiles based on country-specific distributions of intake. However, a significant inverse association was observed for glioma risk among those consuming ≥100 mL coffee and tea per day compared with those consuming <100 mL/d (hazard ratio: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.97; P = 0.03). The association was slightly stronger in men (hazard ratio: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.34, 1.01) than in women (hazard ratio: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.42, 1.31), although neither was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort study, we observed an inverse association between total coffee and tea consumption and risk of glioma that was consistent with the findings of a recent study. These findings, if further replicated in other studies, may provide new avenues of research on gliomas.
  •  
3.
  • Michaud, Dominique S., et al. (författare)
  • Reproductive Factors and Exogenous Hormone Use in Relation to Risk of Glioma and Meningioma in a Large European Cohort Study
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. - American Association for Cancer Research. - 1055-9965. ; 19:10, s. 2562-2569
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: The etiologies of glioma and meningioma tumors are largely unknown. Although reproductive hormones are thought to influence the risk of these tumors, epidemiologic data are not supportive of this hypothesis; however, few cohort studies have published on this topic. We examined the relation between reproductive factors and the risk of glioma and meningioma among women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: After a mean of 8.4 years of follow-up, 193 glioma and 194 meningioma cases were identified among 276,212 women. Information on reproductive factors and hormone use was collected at baseline. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Results: No associations were observed between glioma or meningioma risk and reproductive factors, including age at menarche, parity, age at first birth, menopausal status, and age at menopause. A higher risk of meningioma was observed among postmenopausal women who were current users of hormone replacement therapy (HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.18-2.71) compared with never users. Similarly, current users of oral contraceptives were at higher risk of meningioma than never users (HR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.75-7.46). Conclusion: Our results do not support a role for estrogens and glioma risk. Use of exogenous hormones, especially current use, seems to increase meningioma risk. However, these findings could be due to diagnostic bias and require confirmation. Impact: Elucidating the role of hormones in brain tumor development has important implications and needs to be further examined using biological measurements. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(10); 2562-9. (C) 2010 AACR.
  •  
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 1-3 av 3
 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy