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1.
  • Varenhorst, Eberhard, et al. (författare)
  • The National Prostate Cancer Register in Sweden 1998-2002 : trends in incidence, treatment and survival
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology. - 0036-5599. ; 39:2, s. 117-23
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVES: To provide a descriptive review of the establishment of the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) in Sweden, to present clinical characteristics at diagnosis and to calculate the relative survival of different risk groups after 5 years. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Since 1998, data on all newly diagnosed prostate cancers, including TNM classification, grade of malignancy, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and treatment, have been prospectively collected. For the 35,223 patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2002, relative survival in different risk groups has been calculated. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2002, 96% of all prostate cancer cases diagnosed in Sweden were registered in the NPCR. The number of new cases increased from 6137 in 1998 to 7385 in 2002. The age-standardized rate rose in those aged < 70 years, while it was stable, or possibly declining from 1999, in the older age groups. The proportion of T1c tumours increased from 14% to 28% of all recorded cases. The age-adjusted incidence of advanced tumours (M1 or PSA > 100 ng/ml) decreased by 17%. The proportion of patients receiving curative treatment doubled. Patients with N1 or M1 disease or poorly differentiated tumours (G3 or Gleason score 8-10) had a markedly reduced relative 5-year survival rate. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to establish a nationwide prostate cancer register including basic data for assessment of the disease in the whole of Sweden. The introduction of PSA screening has increased the detection of early prostate cancer in younger men and, to a lesser extent, decreased the incidence of advanced disease. The effect of these changes on mortality is obscure but the NPCR in Sweden will serve as an important tool in such evaluation.
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2.
  • Hagel, Eva, et al. (författare)
  • PCBaSe Sweden : a register-based resource for prostate cancer research
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology. - London : Taylor & Francis. - 0036-5599. ; 43:5, s. 342-9
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective. To construct a database for clinical epidemiological prostate cancer research based on linkages between the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) of Sweden, a population-based, nationwide quality database, and other nationwide registries. Material and methods. By use of the individually unique Swedish Personal Identity Number, the NPCR was linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry, the Cause of Death Register, the Prescribed Drug Register, the National Patient Register and the Acute Myocardial Infarction Register, all held at the Centre for Epidemiology at the National Board of Health and Welfare, and the Register of the Total Population, the Longitudinal Integration Database for Health Insurance and Labor Market Studies and the Multi-Generation Register, held at Statistics Sweden, and to the Swedish Hernia Register. Results. Record linkages between the NPCR and the Swedish Cancer Registry, the Cause of Death Register and the Register of the Total Population generated a database, named PCBaSe Sweden, including 80 079 prostate cancer cases, diagnosed between 1 January 1996 and 31 December 2006. Record linkage between PCBaSe Sweden and the Prescribed Drug Register generated 59 721 unique matches and linkage to the Acute Myocardial Infarction Register resulted in 11 459 matches. Conclusion. PCBaSe Sweden is a newly created and unique database with over 80 000 cases of prostate cancer with comprehensive data on inpatient and outpatient care, patterns of use of prescribed drugs and socioeconomic and familial factors. Many topics in clinical prostate cancer epidemiology can be investigated. using PCBaSe Sweden.
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3.
  • Wirén, Sara, 1981-, et al. (författare)
  • Fatherhood status and risk of prostate cancer : nationwide, population-based case-control study
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - John Wiley & Sons. - 0020-7136. ; 133:4, s. 937-943
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Previous studies have shown a decreased risk of prostate cancer for childless men; however, the cause of the association remains to be elucidated. The aim of our study was to assess the risk of prostate cancer by fatherhood status, also considering potential confounding factors. In a case–control study in Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden 2.0, a nationwide, population-based cohort, data on number of children, marital status, education, comorbidity and tumor characteristics obtained through nationwide healthcare registers and demographic databases for 117,328 prostate cancer cases and 562,644 controls, matched on birth year and county of residence, were analyzed. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for prostate cancer overall and by risk category, adjusting for marital status and education. Childless men had a decreased risk of prostate cancer compared to fathers, OR = 0.83 (95% CI = 0.82–0.84), and risk was lower for low-risk prostate cancer, OR = 0.74 (95% CI = 0.72–0.77), than for metastatic prostate cancer, OR = 0.93 (95% CI = 0.90–0.97). Adjustment for marital status and education attenuated the association in the low-risk category, adjusted OR = 0.87 (95% CI = 0.84–0.91), whereas OR for metastatic cancer remained virtually unchanged, adjusted OR = 0.92 (95% CI = 0.88–0.96). Our data indicate that the association between fatherhood status and prostate cancer to a large part is due to socioeconomic factors influencing healthcare-seeking behavior including testing of prostate-specific antigen levels.
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4.
  • Akre, Olof, et al. (författare)
  • Mortality Among Men with Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Managed with Noncurative Intent: A Nationwide Study in PCBaSe Sweden
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: European Urology. - Elsevier Science BV. - 0302-2838. ; 60:3, s. 554-563
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: There are limited prognostic data for locally advanced prostate cancer PCa to guide in the choice of treatment. Objective: To assess mortality in different prognostic categories among men with locally advanced PCa managed with noncurative intent. Design, setting, and participants: We conducted a register-based nationwide cohort study within the Prostate Cancer DataBase Sweden. The entire cohort of locally advanced PCa included 14 908 men. After the exclusion of 2724 (18%) men treated with curative intent, 12 184 men with locally advanced PCa either with local clinical stage T3 or T4 or with T2 with serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) between 50 and 99 ng/ml and without signs of metastases remained for analysis. Measurements: We followed up the patient cohort in the Cause of Death Register for <= 11 yr and assessed cumulative incidence of PCa -specific death stratified by age and clinical characteristics. Results and limitations: The PCa -specific mortality at 8 yr of follow-up was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25-32%) for Gleason score (GS) 2-6, 41% (95% CI, 38-44%) for GS 7, 52% (95% CI, 47-57%) for GS 8, and 64% (95% CI, 59-69%) for GS 9-10. Even for men aged >85 yr at diagnosis with GS 8-10, PCa was a major cause of death: 42% (95% CI, 37-47%). Men with locally advanced disease and a PSA <4 ng/ml at diagnosis were at particularly increased risk of dying from PCa. One important limitation is the lack of bone scans in 42% of the patient cohort, but results remained after exclusion of patients with unknown metastasis status. Conclusions: The PCa-specific mortality within 8 yr of diagnosis is high in locally advanced PCa, suggesting undertreatment, particularly among men in older age groups. Our results underscore the need for more studies of treatment with curative intent for locally advanced tumors. (C) 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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5.
  • Berglund, Anders, et al. (författare)
  • Differences according to socioeconomic status in the management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: European Journal of Cancer. - Elsevier Science Ltd. - 0959-8049. ; 48:1, s. 75-84
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Outcomes for many cancer forms are associated with socioeconomic status (SES). We investigated if SES was associated with management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer. Material and methods: A nation-wide population-based cohort in Prostate Cancer Data Base Sweden (PCBaSe), a merged database including data on incident prostate cancer identified in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) between 1997 and 2006. High risk PCa was defined as T3 tumour, and/or Gleason score 8-10 and/or PSA 20-50 ng/mL. Use of bone scan, curative treatment, and mortality in relation to SES was assessed by logistic, Cox, and competing risk regression with hazard ratios (HR), sub-distributed HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for co-morbidity, age, calendar period and clinical subgroups. Results: Amongst 17,522 high risk prostate cancer patients, a bone scan was more often performed in higher white-collar than in blue-collar workers (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.21-1.40). Amongst men without metastases, the likelihood of intention to treat was higher in higher white-collar workers (OR 1.43; 95% CI 1.28-1.57). In men who received curative treatment, the likelihood was higher to undergo radical prostatectomy for higher white-collar patients (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.10-1.47). In men without metastases, not only overall mortality was lower amongst higher white-collar workers (HR, 0.76; 95% CI 0.60-0.97), but also prostate cancer-specific mortality (sHR 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49-0.99). Conclusions: We conclude that socioeconomic disparities in the management and mortality in men with high risk prostate cancer exist also within the setting of a National Health Care System aiming to provide care on equal terms to all residents. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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6.
  • Bratt, Ola, et al. (författare)
  • Effects of Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing on Familial Prostate Cancer Risk Estimates.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - 1460-2105. ; 102, s. 1336-1343
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Family history is a strong risk factor for prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased diagnostic activity is related to the incidence of prostate cancer among brothers of men with prostate cancer. Methods Data were from the nationwide population-based Prostate Cancer Database Sweden (PCBaSe Sweden), which includes data from the National Prostate Cancer Register, the Swedish Cancer Register, the Register of the Total Population, the Multi-Generation Register, and the Census database. We investigated the relationship of tumor characteristics, time from diagnosis of the index patient (ie, prostate cancer patients in the National Prostate Cancer Register for whom at least one brother and their father could be identified), calendar period, geographic factors, and socioeconomic status to standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for prostate cancer among 22 511 brothers of 13 975 index patients in PCBaSe Sweden. Results Brothers of index patients with prostate cancer were at increased risk for a diagnosis of prostate cancer (SIR = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.9 to 3.3). Risk was higher for T1c tumors (SIR = 3.4, 95% CI = 3.2 to 3.8) than for metastatic tumors (SIR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.5 to 2.6), and risk of T1c tumors was especially high during the first year after the diagnosis of the index patient (SIR = 4.3, 95% CI = 3.8 to 4.9), compared with the following years (SIR range = 2.8-3.3), and for brothers of index patients who had a higher socioeconomic status (SIR = 4.2, 95% CI = 3.7 to 4.7), compared with brothers of index patients with lower socioeconomic status (SIR = 2.8, 95% CI = 2.4 to 3.2). Conclusions Increased diagnostic activity among men with a family history of prostate cancer appears to contribute to their increased risk of prostate cancer and to lead to detection bias in epidemiological and genetic studies of familial prostate cancer.
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7.
  • Jansson, K. Fredrik, et al. (författare)
  • Concordance of Tumor Differentiation Among Brothers with Prostate Cancer
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: European Urology. - Elsevier Science Bv. - 0302-2838. ; 62:4, s. 656-661
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Genetic factors seem to be of greater importance in prostate cancer than in other forms of cancer. Studies have suggested familial concordance in survival, but the extent to which that is due to tumor characteristics is not known. Objective: We hypothesized that a brother of an index case with prostate cancer is at particularly increased risk of prostate cancer with the same tumor differentiation as the index case. Design, setting and participants: We identified 21 930 brothers of index cases with prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Data Base Sweden and followed them up for incidence of prostate cancer. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis: The relative risk of Gleason score-specific prostate cancer in the cohort of brothers was estimated by using the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) stratified by Gleason score of the index case. We estimated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) assuming a Poisson distribution. Results and limitations: Among brothers of index cases with Gleason score 8-10 cancer, the SIR was 2.53 (95% CI, 1.97-3.21) for a Gleason score 2-6 cancer and 4.00 (95% CI, 2.63-5.82) for a Gleason score 8-10 cancer. SIR for Gleason score 2-6 cancer among brothers decreased with time since the date of the index cases' diagnoses, whereas the risk of Gleason 8-10 cancer increased over time for brothers of index cases with Gleason 8-10 cancer (p for trend = 0.009). Conclusions: Brothers of men with high-grade prostate cancer are at particularly increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer. Likewise, there is a concordance of less malignant prostate cancers within families. These findings may have direct clinical relevance for counseling men with a family history of prostate cancer. (C) 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved.
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8.
  • Robinson, David, et al. (författare)
  • Prediction of Survival of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Based on Early Serial Measurements of Prostate Specific Antigen and Alkaline Phosphatase
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Journal of Urology. - 0022-5347. ; 179:1, s. 117-123
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Purpose: We determined how serial measurements of prostate specific antigen and alkaline phosphatase can be used to predict survival early in the course of hormone treated metastatic prostate cancer.Materials and Methods: The study was based on a prospective randomized trial of 915 patients with metastatic prostate carcinoma designed to compare parenteral estrogen (polyestradiol phosphate) vs total androgen blockade. We included 697 men who survived at least 6 months and had complete serial measurements of prostate specific antigen and alkaline phosphatase. Six models were constructed based on prostate specific antigen and alkaline phosphatase at start, and after 6 months of treatment, alkaline phosphatase flare and relative prostate specific antigen velocity. We constructed time dependent receiver operating characteristic curves with corresponding area under the curve to predict death from prostate cancer within 3 years.Results: The best variables to predict outcome were alkaline phosphatase at 6 months (AUC 0.79 for polyestradiol phosphate and 0.72 for total androgen blockade), alkaline phosphatase at baseline (AUC 0.70 for polyestradiol phosphate and total androgen blockade) and prostate specific antigen at 6 months (AUC 0.70 for polyestradiol phosphate and total androgen blockade). Prostate specific antigen and alkaline phosphatase levels 6 months after start of treatment give better prediction of survival than baseline levels.Conclusions: Alkaline phosphatase at start of treatment and alkaline phosphatase and prostate specific antigen after 6 months can be used to predict survival of hormone treated metastatic prostate cancer.
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9.
  • Berglund, Anders, et al. (författare)
  • Comorbidity, treatment and mortality : a population based cohort study of prostate cancer in PCBaSe Sweden
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Journal of Urology. - Elsevier. - 0022-5347. ; 185:3, s. 833-840
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • PurposeWe examined associations among comorbidity, treatment decisions and mortality in patients with prostate cancer.Materials and MethodsA total of 77,536 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1997 and 2006 were identified in PCBaSe Sweden from the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden. Logistic, Cox and competing risk regression were used to assess associations among Charlson comorbidity index, treatment and mortality. The Charlson comorbidity index was categorized into no (0), mild (1) and severe comorbidity (2+).ResultsIn men with low risk prostate cancer 5,975 of the 13,245 (45.1%) patients without comorbidity underwent radical prostatectomy compared to 256 of the 1,399 (18.9%) men with severe comorbidity. Following adjustment for age and period of diagnosis, radical prostatectomy was less likely to be offered to men with severe comorbidity (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.41–0.55). In men with high risk prostate cancer, radiotherapy was more common (range 7.7% to 21.3%) than radical prostatectomy (range 3.0% to 11.2%) regardless of comorbidity burden. All cause and competing cause but not prostate cancer specific mortality were increased in men with severe comorbidity (all cause HR 1.99, 95% CI 1.93–2.05; competing cause sHR 2.66, 95% CI 2.56–2.78; prostate cancer specific sHR 0.98, 95% CI 0.93–1.03). The cumulative probability of prostate cancer death given no death from competing causes was significantly higher in men with severe comorbidity in all risk groups (p <0.01).ConclusionsComorbidity affects treatment choices, and is associated with all cause, competing cause and conditional prostate cancer specific mortality. An increased conditional prostate cancer specific mortality in men with severe comorbidity may reflect less aggressive treatment, impaired tumor defense, lifestyle factors and poor general health behavior.
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10.
  • Robinson, David, et al. (författare)
  • Ischemic heart disease and stroke before and during endocrine treatment for prostate cancer in PCBaSe Sweden
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Cancer. - Geneve : International union against cancer. - 0020-7136. ; 130:2, s. 478-487
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • In observational studies of men with prostate cancer, men on endocrine treatment (ET) have had an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke. However, prostate cancer per se may increase risk of IHD and stroke and men on ET may have been at increased risk already prior to initiation of ET. We assessed the incidence of IHD and stroke in men with prostate cancer before and during different endocrine treatments. The hazard ratio (HR) of IHD and stroke in 39,051 men with prostate cancer vs. a matched control population without prostate cancer was assessed by use of Cox proportion hazard models. An increased risk was found among 30,883 men with prostate cancer who did not receive ET, with a HR of 1.08 (95% CI 1.00–1.18) for IHD and 1.10 (95%CI 1.00–1.21) for stroke. In 8,168 men who initiated ET during the observation period, the risk of IHD was significantly higher (p = 0.014), during ET (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.17–1.67) compared with before initiation of ET (HR of 0.98, 95% CI 0.72–1.33), whereas no such increase was found for stroke. Regardless of treatment, men with prostate cancer had a small increase in risk of IHD and stroke and initiation of ET was associated with a further increase in risk of IHD. Our data underline the importance of a proper indication for ET because many men with low-risk prostate cancer currently receive ET.
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