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1.
  • Borena, Wegene, et al. (författare)
  • A prospective study on metabolic risk factors and gallbladder cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer (Me-Can) collaborative study
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: PLoS ONE. - 1932-6203. ; 9:2, s. e89368
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective: To investigate the association between metabolic risk factors (individually and in combination) and risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC). Methods: The metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can) includes cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden with data on 578,700 men and women. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to calculate relative risks of GBC by body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and plasma levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides as continuous standardised variables and their standardised sum of metabolic syndrome (MetS) z-score. The risk estimates were corrected for random error in measurements. Results: During an average follow-up of 12.0 years (SD = 7.8), 184 primary gallbladder cancers were diagnosed. Relative risk of gallbladder cancer per unit increment of z-score adjusted for age, smoking status and BMI (except for BMI itself) and stratified by birth year, sex and sub-cohorts, was for BMI 1.31 (95% confidence interval 1.11, 1.57) and blood glucose 1.76 (1.10, 2.85). Further analysis showed that the effect of BMI on GBC risk is larger among women in the premenopausal age group (1.84 (1.23, 2.78)) compared to those in the postmenopausal age group (1.29 (0.93, 1.79)). For the other metabolic factors no significant association was found (mid blood pressure 0.96 (0.71, 1.31), cholesterol 0.84 (0.66, 1.06) and serum triglycerides 1.16 (0.82, 1.64)). The relative risk per one unit increment of the MetS z-score was 1.37 (1.07, 1.73). Conclusion: This study showed that increasing BMI and impaired glucose metabolism pose a possible risk for gallbladder cancer. Beyond the individual factors, the results also showed that the metabolic syndrome as an entity presents a risk constellation for the occurrence of gallbladder cancer.
2.
  • Almquist, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic factors and risk of thyroid cancer in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can)
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Springer. - 0957-5243. ; 22:5, s. 743-751
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective  To investigate metabolic factors and their possible impact on risk of thyroid cancer. Methods  A prospective cohort study was conducted based on seven population-based cohorts in Norway, Austria, and Sweden, in the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can). Altogether 578,700 men and women with a mean age of 44.0 years at baseline were followed for on average 12.0 years. Relative risk of incident thyroid cancer was assessed by levels of BMI, blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and by a combined metabolic syndrome (MetS) score. Risk estimates were investigated for quintiles, and a z score distribution of exposures was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results  During follow-up, 255 women and 133 men were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. In women, there was an inverse association between glucose and thyroid cancer risk, with adjusted RR: 95% CI was 0.61 (0.41–0.90), p trend = 0.02 in the fifth versus the first quintile, and a positive association between BMI and thyroid cancer risk with a significant trend over quintiles. There was no association between the other metabolic factors, single or combined (Met-S), and thyroid cancer. Conclusion  In women, BMI was positively, while blood glucose levels were inversely, associated with thyroid cancer.
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3.
  • Bjørge, Tone, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic risk factors and ovarian cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - 0300-5771. ; 40:6, s. 1667-1677
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: No studies have so far evaluated the impact of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as an entity on ovarian cancer risk. The authors aimed to examine the association between factors in the MetS, individually and combined, and risk of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality. METHODS: Altogether, 290 000 women from Austria, Norway and Sweden were enrolled during 1974-2005, with measurements taken of height, weight, blood pressure and levels of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. Relative risks (RRs) of ovarian cancer were estimated using Cox regression for each MetS factor in quintiles and for standardized levels (z-scores), and for a composite z-score for the MetS. RRs were corrected for random error in measurements. RESULTS: During follow-up, 644 epithelial ovarian cancers and 388 deaths from ovarian cancer were identified. There was no overall association between MetS and ovarian cancer risk. Increasing levels of cholesterol [RR 1.52, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01-2.29, per 1-U increment of z-score] and blood pressure (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.12-2.86) conferred, however, increased risks of mucinous and endometrioid tumours, respectively. In women below the age of 50 years, there was increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality for MetS (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.00-2.30). Increasing levels of BMI (RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.37) conferred increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality in women above the age of 50 years. CONCLUSION: There was no overall association between MetS and ovarian cancer risk. However, increasing levels of cholesterol and blood pressure increased the risks of mucinous and endometrioid tumours, respectively. Increasing levels of BMI conferred an increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality in women above the age of 50 years.
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4.
  • Edlinger, Michael, et al. (författare)
  • Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Journal of Hypertension. - 0263-6352. ; 30:2, s. 290-296
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVES:: Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults. METHODS:: In the Me-Can project, 580 000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error. RESULTS:: During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n = 348) and high-grade glioma (n = 436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio = 1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio = 1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio = 1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio = 1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP. CONCLUSION:: Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas.
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5.
  • Häggström, Christel, et al. (författare)
  • Prostate Cancer, Prostate Cancer Death, and Death from Other Causes, Among Men with Metabolic Aberrations
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Epidemiology. - 1531-5487. ; 25:6, s. 823-828
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Few previous studies of metabolic aberrations and prostate cancer risk have taken into account the fact that men with metabolic aberrations have an increased risk of death from causes other than prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to calculate, in a real-life scenario, the risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes.Methods: In the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project, prospective data on body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were collected from 285,040 men. Risks of prostate cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes were calculated by use of competing risk analysis for men with normal (bottom 84%) and high (top 16%) levels of each factor, and a composite score.Results: During a mean follow-up period of 12 years, 5,893 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, 1,013 died of prostate cancer, and 26,328 died of other causes. After 1996, when prostate-specific antigen testing was introduced, men up to age 80 years with normal metabolic levels had 13% risk of prostate cancer, 2% risk of prostate cancer death, and 30% risk of death from other causes, whereas men with metabolic aberrations had corresponding risks of 11%, 2%, and 44%.Conclusions: In contrast to recent studies using conventional survival analysis, in a real-world scenario taking risk of competing events into account, men with metabolic aberrations had lower risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, similar risk of prostate cancer death, and substantially higher risk of death from other causes compared with men who had normal metabolic levels.
6.
  • Stocks, Tanja, et al. (författare)
  • Blood pressure and risk of cancer incidence and mortality in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: Hypertension. - Philadelphia : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. - 0194-911X. ; 59:4, s. 802-810
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Observational studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between blood pressure and cancer risk. We investigated the association in 7 cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden. In total, 577799 adults with a mean age of 44 years were followed for, on average, 12 years. Incident cancers were 22184 in men and 14744 in women, and cancer deaths were 8724 and 4525, respectively. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios of cancer per 10-mmHg increments of midblood pressure, which corresponded with 0.7 SDs and, for example, an increment of systolic/diastolic blood pressure of 130/80 to 142/88 mmHg. All of the models used age as the time scale and were adjusted for possible confounders, including body mass index and smoking status. In men, midblood pressure was positively related to total incident cancer (hazard ratio per 10 mmHg increment: 1.07 [95% CI: 1.04-1.09]) and to cancer of the oropharynx, colon, rectum, lung, bladder, kidney, malignant melanoma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. In women, midblood pressure was not related to total incident cancer but was positively related to cancer of the liver, pancreas, cervix, uterine corpus, and malignant melanoma. A positive association was also found for cancer mortality, with HRs per 10-mmHg increment of 1.12 (95% CI: 1.08-1.15) for men and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.11) for women. These results suggest a small increased cancer risk overall in men with elevated blood pressure level and a higher risk for cancer death in men and women.
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7.
  • Stocks, Tanja, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic risk score and cancer risk pooled analysis of seven cohorts
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - 0300-5771. ; 44:4, s. 1353-1387
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: There are few data on the joint influence of metabolic factors on risk of separate cancers. Methods: We analysed data on body mass index, blood pressure and plasma levels of glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides from seven European cohorts comprising 564 596 men and women with a mean age of 44 years. We weighted those factors equally into a standardized metabolic risk score [MRS, mean = 0, standard deviation (SD) = 1], with an individual's level indicated as SDs from the sex-and cohort-specific means. Cancer hazard ratios were calculated by Cox regression with age as timescale and with relevant adjustments including smoking status. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: During a mean follow-up of 12 years, 21 593 men and 14 348 women were diagnosed with cancer. MRS was linearly and positively associated with incident cancer in total and at sites (P<0.05). In men, risk per SD MRS was increased by 43% (95% confidence interval: 27-61) for renal cell cancer, 43% (16-76) for liver cancer, 29% (20-38) for colon cancer, 27% (5-54) for oesophageal cancer, 20% (9-31) for rectal cancer, 19% (4-37) for leukaemias, 15% (1-30) for oral cancer and 10% (2-19) for bladder cancer. In women, risk increases per SD MRS were 56% (42-70) for endometrial cancer, 53% (29-81) for pancreatic cancer, 40% (16-67) for renal cell cancer, 27% (9-47) for cervical cancer and 17% (3-32) for rectal cancer. Conclusion: This largest study to date on the joint influence of metabolic factors on risk of separate cancers showed increased risks for several cancers, in particular renal cell and liver cancer in men and endometrial and pancreatic cancer in women.
8.
  • Johansen, Dorthe, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic factors and the risk of pancreatic cancer: a prospective analysis of almost 580,000 men and women in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology. - 1538-7755. ; 19:9, s. 2307-2317
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between factors in metabolic syndrome (MetS; single and combined) and the risk of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: The Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project is a pooled cohort containing data on body mass index, blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides. During follow-up, 862 individuals were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals using the above-mentioned factors categorized into quintiles and transformed into z-scores. All z-scores were summarized and a second z-transformation creating a composite z-score for MetS was done. All risk estimates were calibrated to correct for a regression dilution bias. RESULTS: The trend over quintiles was positively associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer for mid-blood pressure (mid-BP) and glucose in men and for body mass index, mid-BP, and glucose in women. The z-score for the adjusted mid-BP (RR, 1.10; 1.01-1.20) and the calibrated z-score for glucose (RR, 1.37; 1.14-1.34) were positively associated with pancreatic cancer in men. In women, a positive association was found for calibrated z-scores for mid-BP (RR, 1.34; 1.08-1.66), for the calibrated z-score for glucose (RR, 1.98; 1.41-2.76), and for the composite z-score for MetS (RR, 1.58; 1.34-1.87). CONCLUSION: Our study adds further evidence to a possible link between abnormal glucose metabolism and risk of pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: To our knowledge, this is the first study on MetS and pancreatic cancer using prediagnostic measurements of the examined factors.
9.
  • Häggström, Christel, et al. (författare)
  • Competing risk analysis of metabolic factors and prostate cancer
  • ????
  • Annan publikation (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Background: Men at risk of prostate cancer are also at risk of competing events but this has been ignored in most studies of metabolic aberrations and prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to assess probabilities of prostate cancer and prostate cancer death by use of competing risk analysis.Methods: In the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can), data on body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, total cholesterol, and triglycerides were collected from 285 040 men. Probabilities of prostate cancer, prostate cancer death and competing events, i.e. all-cause death or death from other causes, respectively, were calculated for men with normal (bottom 84%) and high (top 16%) levels of each metabolic factor and a composite score based on all metabolic factorsResults: During follow up, 5893 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, 1013 men died of prostate cancer, and 26 328 men died of other causes. Men with high levels of metabolic factors had decreased probability of prostate cancer, similar probability of prostate cancer death, and increased probability of other causes of death compared to men with normal levels. After 1996, when prostate specific antigen was used for detection of prostate cancer, men up to 80 years with normal levels of metabolic factors had 13% probability of prostate cancer and 37% probability of death from all causes. For men with high levels of metabolic factors, corresponding probabilities were 12% and 47%.Conclusions: Men with metabolic aberrations had a decreased probability of prostate cancer but a substantially higher probability of death from all causes.
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10.
  • Stocks, Tanja, 1977-, et al. (författare)
  • Metabolic factors and risk of colorectal cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can)
  • 2011
  • Ingår i: Cancer. - 0008-543X. ; 117:11, s. 2398-2407
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BackgroundThe metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been related to an increased risk of colorectal cancer in some small studies, but it is unknown which factors in the MetS that are most strongly related to risk, and if there is an interaction between factors.Methods and FindingsIn the Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can), data on body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides were available in 289,866 men and 288,834 women. Mean age at baseline was 44.0 years and mean follow-up time was 12.0 years. During follow-up, 2,834 men and 1,861 women were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. We used Cox regression models to calculate relative risk (RR) of colorectal cancer by exposures transformed into Z scores (mean = 0, standard deviation = 1), and for a MetS Z score, and used regression calibration to correct exposure levels for random error in measurement. Significant increases in risk per one unit increment of factors were observed in men for BMI, RR 1.07 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.13), blood pressure, RR 1.10 (1.02-1.18), and triglycerides, RR 1.17 (1.06-1.28), and in women for BMI, RR 1.08 (1.01-1.15). The RR of colorectal cancer per one unit increment of the MetS Z score was 1.24 (1.18-1.31) in men, and 1.14 (1.06-1.22) in women. There was no significant positive interaction for any combination of two metabolic factors. Associations between metabolic factors and risk of fatal colorectal cancer were similar to those for incident cancer.ConclusionsOur data add further evidence for an association between factors in the MetS, in single and combined, and risk of colorectal cancer. Our data do not support an interaction between factors in the MetS on risk.
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