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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Erlinge D) srt2:(2010-2014)"

Sökning: WFRF:(Erlinge D) > (2010-2014)

  • Resultat 11-19 av 19
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  • Gurbel, Paul A., et al. (författare)
  • Platelet Function During Extended Prasugrel and Clopidogrel Therapy for Patients With ACS Treated Without Revascularization The TRILOGY ACS Platelet Function Substudy
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. - : American Medical Association (AMA). - 1538-3598. ; 308:17, s. 1785-1794
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Context The relationship of platelet function testing measurements with outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) initially managed medically without revascularization is unknown. Objective To characterize the differences and evaluate clinical outcomes associated with platelet reactivity among patients with ACS treated with clopidogrel or prasugrel. Design, Setting, and Patients Patients with medically managed unstable angina or non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were enrolled in the TRILOGY ACS trial (2008 to 2011) comparing clopidogrel vs prasugrel. Of 9326 participants, 27.5% were included in a platelet function substudy: 1286 treated with prasugrel and 1278 treated with clopidogrel. Interventions Aspirin with either prasugrel (10 or 5 mg/d) or clopidogrel (75 mg/d); those 75 years or older and younger than 75 years but who weighed less than 60 kg received a 5-mg prasugrel maintenance dose. Main Outcome Measures Platelet reactivity, measured in P2Y(12) reaction units (PRUs), was performed at baseline, at 2 hours, and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after randomization. The primary efficacy end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke through 30 months. Results Among participants younger than 75 years and weighing 60 kg or more, the median PRU values at 30 days were 64 (interquartile range [IQR], 33-128) in the prasugrel group vs 200 (IQR, 141-260) in the clopidogrel group (P<.001), a difference that persisted through all subsequent time points. For participants younger than 75 years and weighing less than 60 kg, the median 30-day PRU values were 139 (IQR, 86-203) for the prasugrel group vs 209 (IQR, 148-283) for the clopidogrel group (P<.001), and for participants 75 years or older, the median PRU values were 164 (IQR, 105-216) for the prasugrel group vs 222 (IQR, 148-268) for the clopidogrel group (P<.001). At 30 months the rate of the primary efficacy end point was 17.2% (160 events) in the prasugrel group vs 18.9% (180 events) in the clopidogrel group (P=.29). There were no significant differences in the continuous distributions of 30-day PRU values for participants with a primary efficacy end point event after 30 days (n=214) compared with participants without an event (n=1794; P=.07) and no significant relationship between the occurence of the primary efficacy end point and continuous PRU values (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] for increase of 60 PRUs, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.96-1.11; P=.44). Similar findings were observed with 30-day PRU cut points used to define high on-treatment platelet reactivity-PRU more than 208 (adjusted HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.89-1.52, P=.28) and PRU more than 230 (adjusted HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 0.90-1.61; P=.21). Conclusions Among patients with ACS without ST-segment elevation and initially managed without revascularization, prasugrel was associated with lower platelet reactivity than clopidogrel, irrespective of age, weight, and dose. Among those in the platelet substudy, no significant differences existed between prasugrel vs clopidogrel in the occurence of the primary efficacy end point through 30 months and no significant association existed between platelet reactivity and occurrence of ischemic outcomes.
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  • Malm, Johan, et al. (författare)
  • Developments in biobanking workflow standardization providing sample integrity and stability
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Journal of Proteomics. - : Elsevier BV. - 1874-3919 .- 1876-7737. ; 95:SI, s. 38-45
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Recommendations and outlines for standardization in biobanking processes are presented by a research team with long-term experience in clinical studies. These processes have important bearing on the use of samples in developing assays. These measurements are useful to document states of health and disease that are beneficial for academic research, commercial healthcare, drug development industry and government regulating agencies. There is a need for increasing awareness within proteomic and genomic communities regarding the basic concepts of collecting, storing and utilizing clinical samples. Quality control and sample suitability for analysis need to be documented and validated to ensure data integrity and establish contexts for interpretation of results. Standardized methods in proteomics and genomics are required to be practiced throughout the community allowing datasets to be comparable and shared for analysis. For example, sample processing of thousands of clinical samples, performed in 384 high-density sample tube systems in a fully automated workflow, preserves sample content and is presented showing validation criteria. Large studies will be accompanied by biological and molecular information with corresponding clinical records from patients and healthy donors. These developments position biobanks of human patient samples as an increasingly recognized major asset in disease research, future drug development and within patient care. Biological significance: The current manuscript is of major relevance to the proteomic and genomic fields, as it outlines the standardization aspects of biobanking and the requirements that are needed to run future clinical studies that will benefit the patients where OMICS science will play a major role. A global view of the field is given where best practice and conventional acceptances are presented along with ongoing large-scale biobanking projects. The authors represent broadly stakeholders that cover the academic, pharma, biotech and healthcare fields with extensive experience and deliveries. This contribution will be a milestone paper to the proteomic and genomic scientists to present data in the future that will have impact to the life science area.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Standardization and Quality Control in Proteomics.
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  • McCloskey, Conor, et al. (författare)
  • Kv1.3 is the exclusive voltage-gated K plus channel of platelets and megakaryocytes: roles in membrane potential, Ca2+signalling and platelet count
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Journal of Physiology. - : Wiley. - 1469-7793 .- 0022-3751. ; 588:9, s. 1399-1406
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • A delayed rectifier voltage-gated K+ channel (Kv) represents the largest ionic conductance of platelets and megakaryocytes, but is undefined at the molecular level. Quantitative RT-PCR of all known Kv alpha and ancillary subunits showed that only Kv1.3 (KCNA3) is substantially expressed in human platelets. Furthermore, megakaryocytes from Kv1.3-/- mice or from wild-type mice exposed to the Kv1.3 blocker margatoxin completely lacked Kv currents and displayed substantially depolarised resting membrane potentials. In human platelets, margatoxin reduced the P2X(1)- and thromboxaneA(2) receptor-evoked [Ca2+](i) increases and delayed the onset of store-operated Ca2+ influx. Megakaryocyte development was normal in Kv1.3-/- mice, but the platelet count was increased, consistent with a role of Kv1.3 in apoptosis or decreased platelet activation. We conclude that Kv1.3 forms the Kv channel of the platelet and megakaryocyte, which sets the resting membrane potential, regulates agonist-evoked Ca2+ increases and influences circulating platelet numbers.
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18.
  • Nielsen, Niklas, et al. (författare)
  • Targeted Temperature Management at 33 degrees C versus 36 degrees C after Cardiac Arrest
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: New England Journal of Medicine. - 0028-4793. ; 369:23, s. 2197-2206
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BackgroundUnconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a high risk of death or poor neurologic function. Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended by international guidelines, but the supporting evidence is limited, and the target temperature associated with the best outcome is unknown. Our objective was to compare two target temperatures, both intended to prevent fever. MethodsIn an international trial, we randomly assigned 950 unconscious adults after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause to targeted temperature management at either 33 degrees C or 36 degrees C. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality through the end of the trial. Secondary outcomes included a composite of poor neurologic function or death at 180 days, as evaluated with the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale and the modified Rankin scale. ResultsIn total, 939 patients were included in the primary analysis. At the end of the trial, 50% of the patients in the 33 degrees C group (235 of 473 patients) had died, as compared with 48% of the patients in the 36 degrees C group (225 of 466 patients) (hazard ratio with a temperature of 33 degrees C, 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89 to 1.28; P=0.51). At the 180-day follow-up, 54% of the patients in the 33 degrees C group had died or had poor neurologic function according to the CPC, as compared with 52% of patients in the 36 degrees C group (risk ratio, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.16; P=0.78). In the analysis using the modified Rankin scale, the comparable rate was 52% in both groups (risk ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.14; P=0.87). The results of analyses adjusted for known prognostic factors were similar. ConclusionsIn unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause, hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33 degrees C did not confer a benefit as compared with a targeted temperature of 36 degrees C. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and others; TTM ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01020916.)
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  • Resultat 11-19 av 19
  • Föregående 1[2]

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