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Sökning: WFRF:(Abé Christoph)

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1.
  • Abé, Christoph, et al. (författare)
  • Longitudinal Structural Brain Changes in Bipolar Disorder: A Multicenter Neuroimaging Study of 1232 Individuals by the ENIGMA Bipolar Disorder Working Group.
  • 2022
  • Ingår i: Biological psychiatry. - 1873-2402. ; 91:6, s. 582-592
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with cortical and subcortical structural brain abnormalities. It is unclear whether such alterations progressively change over time, and how this is related to the number of mood episodes. To address this question, we analyzed a large and diverse international sample with longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical data to examine structural brain changes over time in BD.Longitudinal structural MRI and clinical data from the ENIGMA (Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics through Meta Analysis) BD Working Group, including 307 patients with BD and 925 healthy control subjects, were collected from 14 sites worldwide. Male and female participants, aged 40 ± 17 years, underwent MRI at 2 time points. Cortical thickness, surface area, and subcortical volumes were estimated using FreeSurfer. Annualized change rates for each imaging phenotype were compared between patients with BD and healthy control subjects. Within patients, we related brain change rates to the number of mood episodes between time points and tested for effects of demographic and clinical variables.Compared with healthy control subjects, patients with BD showed faster enlargement of ventricular volumes and slower thinning of the fusiform and parahippocampal cortex (0.18
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  • Abé, Christoph, et al. (författare)
  • Brain structure and clinical profile point to neurodevelopmental factors involved in pedophilic disorder
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. - : John Wiley & Sons. - 0001-690X .- 1600-0447. ; 143:4, s. 363-374
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective: Pedophilic disorder (PD) is characterized bypersistent, intense sexual attraction to prepubertal children that the individual has acted on, or causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty. Although prior research suggests that PD has neurodevelopmental underpinnings, the evidence remains sparse. To aid the understanding of etiology and treatment development, we quantified neurobiological and clinical correlates of PD.Method: We compared 55 self-referred, help-seeking, non-forensic male patients with DSM-5 PD with 57 age-matched, healthy male controls (HC) on clinical, neuropsychological, and structural brain imaging measures (cortical thickness and surface area, subcortical and white matter volumes). Structural brain measures were related to markers for aberrant neurodevelopment including IQ, and the 2nd to 4th digit ratio (2D:4D).Results: PD was associated with psychiatric disorder comorbidity and ADHD and autism spectrum disorder symptoms. PD patients had lower total IQ than HC. PD individuals exhibited cortical surface area abnormalities in regions belonging to the brain's default mode network and showed abnormal volume of white matter underlying those regions. PD subjects had smaller hippocampi and nuclei accumbens than HC. Findings were not related to history of child-related sexual offending. IQ correlated negatively with global expression of PD-related brain features and 2D:4D correlated with surface area in PD.Conclusions: In the largest single-center study to date, we delineate psychiatric comorbidity, neurobiological and cognitive correlates of PD. Our morphometric findings, their associations with markers of aberrant neurodevelopment, and psychiatric comorbidities suggest that neurodevelopmental mechanisms are involved in PD. The findings may need consideration in future development of clinical management of PD patients.
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4.
  • Abé, Christoph, et al. (författare)
  • Cortical brain structure and sexual orientation in adult females with bipolar disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Brain and Behavior. - 2162-3279 .- 2162-3279. ; 8:7
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Nonheterosexual individuals have higher risk of psychiatric morbidity. Together with growing evidence for sexual orientation‐related brain differences, this raises the concern that sexual orientation may be an important factor to control for in neuroimaging studies of neuropsychiatric disorders.Methods: We studied sexual orientation in adult psychiatric patients with bipolar disorder (BD) or ADHD in a large clinical cohort (N = 154). We compared cortical brain structure in exclusively heterosexual women (HEW, n = 29) with that of nonexclusively heterosexual women (nHEW, n = 37) using surface‐based reconstruction techniques provided by FreeSurfer.Results: The prevalence of nonheterosexual sexual orientation was tentatively higher than reported in general population samples. Consistent with previously reported cross‐sex shifted brain patterns among homosexual individuals, nHEW patients showed significantly larger cortical volumes than HEW in medial occipital brain regions.Conclusion: We found evidence for a sex‐reversed difference in cortical volume among nonheterosexual female patients, which provides insights into the neurobiology of sexual orientation, and may provide the first clues toward a better neurobiological understanding of the association between sexual orientation and mental health. We also suggest that sexual orientation is an important factor to consider in future neuroimaging studies of populations with certain mental health disorders.
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5.
  • Abé, Christoph, et al. (författare)
  • Cortical thickness, volume and surface area in patients with bipolar disorder types I and II.
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPN. - 1488-2434. ; 41:4, s. 240-50
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common chronic psychiatric disorder mainly characterized by episodes of mania, hypomania and depression. The disorder is associated with cognitive impairments and structural brain abnormalities, such as lower cortical volumes in primarily frontal brain regions than healthy controls. Although bipolar disorder types I (BDI) and II (BDII) exhibit different symptoms and severity, previous studies have focused on BDI. Furthermore, the most frequently investigated measure in this population is cortical volume. The aim of our study was to investigate abnormalities in patients with BDI and BDII by simultaneously analyzing cortical volume, thickness and surface area, which yields more information about disease- and symptom-related neurobiology.
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6.
  • Abé, Christoph, et al. (författare)
  • Longitudinal Cortical Thickness Changes in Bipolar Disorder and the Relationship to Genetic Risk, Mania, and Lithium Use.
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Biological psychiatry. - 1873-2402. ; 87:3, s. 271-281
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Bipolar disorder (BD) is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder characterized by episodes of manic and depressed mood states and associated with cortical brain abnormalities. Although the course of BD is often progressive, longitudinal brain imaging studies are scarce. It remains unknown whether brain abnormalities are static traits of BD or result from pathological changes over time. Moreover, the genetic effect on implicated brain regions remains unknown.Patients with BD and healthy control (HC) subjects underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging at baseline (123 patients, 83 HC subjects) and after 6 years (90 patients, 61 HC subjects). Cortical thickness maps were generated using FreeSurfer. Using linear mixed effects models, we compared longitudinal changes in cortical thickness between patients with BD and HC subjects across the whole brain. We related our findings to genetic risk for BD and tested for effects of demographic and clinical variables.Patients showed abnormal cortical thinning of temporal cortices and thickness increases in visual/somatosensory brain areas. Thickness increases were related to genetic risk and lithium use. Patients who experienced hypomanic or manic episodes between time points showed abnormal thinning in inferior frontal cortices. Cortical changes did not differ between diagnostic BD subtypes I and II.In the largest longitudinal BD study to date, we detected abnormal cortical changes with high anatomical resolution. We delineated regional effects of clinical symptoms, genetic factors, and medication that may explain progressive brain changes in BD. Our study yields important insights into disease mechanisms and suggests that neuroprogression plays a role in BD.
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7.
  • Abé, Christoph, et al. (författare)
  • Manic episodes are related to changes in frontal cortex: a longitudinal neuroimaging study of bipolar disorder 1.
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Brain : a journal of neurology. - 1460-2156. ; 138:Pt 11, s. 3440-8
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Higher numbers of manic episodes in bipolar patients has, in cross-sectional studies, been associated with less grey matter volume in prefrontal brain areas. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if manic episodes set off progressive cortical changes, or if the association is better explained by premorbid brain conditions that increase risk for mania. We followed patients with bipolar disorder type 1 for 6 years. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed at baseline and follow-up. We compared patients who had at least one manic episode between baseline and follow-up (Mania group, n = 13) with those who had no manic episodes (No-Mania group, n = 18). We used measures of cortical volume, thickness, and area to assess grey matter changes between baseline and follow-up. We found significantly decreased frontal cortical volume (dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex) in the Mania group, but no volume changes in the No-Mania group. Our results indicate that volume decrease in frontal brain regions can be attributed to the incidence of manic episodes.
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  • Bayard, Frida, et al. (författare)
  • Emotional Instability Relates to Ventral Striatum Activity During Reward Anticipation in Females
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. - : Frontiers Media S.A.. - 1662-5153 .- 1662-5153. ; 14
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Both non-emotional symptoms, such as inattention, and symptoms of emotional instability (EI) are partially co-varying and normally distributed in the general population. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), which is associated with both inattention and emotional instability, has been related to lower reward anticipation activation in the ventral striatum. However, it is not known whether non-emotional dysregulation, such as inattention, or EI-or both-are associated with this effect. We hypothesized that altered reward processing relates specifically to EI. To test this, 29 healthy participants were recruited to this functional MRI study (n= 15 females). Reward processing was studied using a modified version of the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) task. Brown Attention-Deficit Disorder Scales questionnaire was used to assess EI and inattention symptoms on a trait level. We observed less ventral striatal activation during reward anticipation related to the EI trait in females, also when controlling for the inattention trait, but not in the whole sample or males only. Our study suggests the existence of sex differences in the relationship between reward processing and EI/inattention traits.
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10.
  • McWhinney, Sean R, et al. (författare)
  • Association between body mass index and subcortical brain volumes in bipolar disorders-ENIGMA study in 2735 individuals.
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Molecular psychiatry. - 1476-5578.
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Individuals with bipolar disorders (BD) frequently suffer from obesity, which is often associated with neurostructural alterations. Yet, the effects of obesity on brain structure in BD are under-researched. We obtained MRI-derived brain subcortical volumes and body mass index (BMI) from 1134 BD and 1601 control individuals from 17 independent research sites within the ENIGMA-BD Working Group. We jointly modeled the effects of BD and BMI on subcortical volumes using mixed-effects modeling and tested for mediation of group differences by obesity using nonparametric bootstrapping. All models controlled for age, sex, hemisphere, total intracranial volume, and data collection site. Relative to controls, individuals with BD had significantly higher BMI, larger lateral ventricular volume, and smaller volumes of amygdala, hippocampus, pallidum, caudate, and thalamus. BMI was positively associated with ventricular and amygdala and negatively with pallidal volumes. When analyzed jointly, both BD and BMI remained associated with volumes of lateral ventricles  and amygdala. Adjusting for BMI decreased the BD vs control differences in ventricular volume. Specifically, 18.41% of the association between BD and ventricular volume was mediated by BMI (Z = 2.73, p = 0.006). BMI was associated with similar regional brain volumes as BD, including lateral ventricles, amygdala, and pallidum. Higher BMI may in part account for larger ventricles, one of the most replicated findings in BD. Comorbidity with obesity could explain why neurostructural alterations are more pronounced in some individuals with BD. Future prospective brain imaging studies should investigate whether obesity could be a modifiable risk factor for neuroprogression.
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