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Sökning: WFRF:(Bobjer J.)

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1.
  • Bobjer, J., et al. (författare)
  • A population-based study on the effect of a routine second-look resection on survival in primary stage T1 bladder cancer
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Urology. - : Taylor & Francis. - 2168-1805 .- 2168-1813. ; 55:2, s. 108-115
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective To assess the value of second-look resection (SLR) in stage T1 bladder cancer (BCa) with respect to progression-free survival (PFS), and also the secondary outcomes recurrence-free survival (RFS), bladder-cancer-specific survival (CSS), and cystectomy-free survival (CFS). Patients and methods The study included 2456 patients diagnosed with stage T1 BCa 2004-2009 with 5-yr follow-up registration in the nationwide Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). PFS, RFS, CSS, and CFS were evaluated in stage T1 BCa patients with or without routine SLR, using univariate and multivariable Cox regression with adjustment for multiple confounders (age, gender, tumour grade, intravesical treatment, hospital volume, comorbidity, and educational level). Results SLR was performed in 642 (26%) individuals, and more frequently on patients who were aged < 75 yr, had grade 3 tumours, and had less comorbidity. There was no association between SLR and PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.1, confidence interval [CI] 0.85-1.3), RFS (HR 1.0, CI 0.90-1.2), CFS (HR 1.2, CI 0.95-1.5) or CSS (HR 1.1, CI 0.89-1.4). Conclusions We found similar survival outcomes in patients with and patients without SLR, but our study is likely affected by selection mechanisms. A randomised study defining the role of SLR in stage T1 BCa would be highly relevant to guide current praxis.
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2.
  • Kruljac, M., et al. (författare)
  • Symptoms of sexual dysfunction among men from infertile couples : prevalence and association with testosterone deficiency
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Andrology. - : Wiley-Blackwell. - 2047-2919 .- 2047-2927. ; 8:1, s. 160-165
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: This case control study aimed to investigate whether symptoms of sexual dysfunction are more common in males from infertile couples than in the general population and to explore whether symptoms of sexual dysfunction are associated to hypogonadism. Objectives: Participants were 165 subfertile men in infertile heterosexual relationships, 18–50 years of age, with sperm concentrations < 15 × 106/mL. The controls were 199 men from a population-based group, matched for age. Material and methods: Logistic regression was applied in order to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for seven different symptoms of sexual dysfunction. In a multivariate model, we tested independent effects of infertility and primary as well as secondary hypogonadism. Results: Statistically significant association between subfertility and symptoms of sexual dysfunction was found for lack of ability to control ejaculation (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.2–4.2). For hypogonadism, statistical significance was seen both in relation to low sexual interest/desire for sex (OR 2.3, 95% CI: 1.0–5.5) and for being worried about the size or shape of the penis (OR 3.6, 95% CI: 1.3–9.5). These associations remained statistically significant in males with primary but not those with secondary hypogonadism. Discussion: Our study showed that men from infertile couples have an increased risk of symptoms of sexual dysfunction and this risk is linked to androgen deficiency. Conclusion: Assessment of reproductive hormone levels and sexual function should routinely be done in this group of males.
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3.
  • Isaksson, S., et al. (författare)
  • High risk of hypogonadism in young male cancer survivors
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Clinical Endocrinology. - : Wiley-Blackwell. - 0300-0664. ; 88:3, s. 432-441
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective: Cancer and its treatment in childhood and young adulthood can cause hypogonadism, leading to increased risk of long-term morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of presenting with biochemical signs of hypogonadism in testicular cancer survivors (TCS) and male childhood cancer survivors (CCS) in relation to the type of treatment given. Design: Case-control study. Patients: Ninety-two TCS, 125 CCS (mean age 40 and median age 34 years, respectively; mean follow-up time 9.2 and 24 years, respectively) and a corresponding number of age-matched controls. Measurements: Fasting morning blood samples were analysed for total testosterone (TT), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The odds ratios (OR) for hypogonadism, defined as primary, secondary, compensated or ongoing androgen replacement, were calculated for TCS and CCS and for subgroups defined by diagnosis and treatment. Results: Hypogonadism was found in 26% of CCS and 36% of TCS, respectively (OR: 2.1, P = .025 and OR = 2.3, P = .021). Among CCS, the OR was further increased in those given testicular irradiation (OR = 28, P = .004). Radiotherapy other than cranial or testicular irradiation plus chemotherapy, or cranial irradiation without chemotherapy, associated also with increased ORs (OR = 3.7, P = .013, and OR = 4.4, P = .038, respectively). Among TCS, those receiving >4 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy had OR = 17, P = .015. Conclusions: Biochemical signs of testosterone deficiency are recognized as markers of decreased life expectancy. Thus, the risk of hypogonadism in TCS and CCS should be recognized and emphasizes the need of long-term follow-up for these men.
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5.
  • Isaksson, S., et al. (författare)
  • Low bone mineral density is associated with hypogonadism and cranial irradiation in male childhood cancer survivors
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Osteoporosis International. - : Springer. - 0937-941X. ; 31:7, s. 1261-1272
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Summary: We investigated if bone mineral density was related to testosterone deficiency and/or previous cancer treatment in men who were childhood cancer survivors. Men with untreated testosterone deficiency or previous treatment with cranial irradiation were at increased risk of impaired bone health. Prevention of osteoporosis should be considered in their follow-up. Introduction: Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at increased risk of hypogonadism. Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported in CCS but it is unclear whether this is due to hypogonadism or a direct effect of cancer therapy. This study investigated BMD in CCS, and association with hypogonadism, previous treatment and cancer type. Methods: Investigation of 125 CCS (median age 33.7 at inclusion; 9.6 at diagnosis) and 125 age-matched population controls. Serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone were assayed and BMD at total hip and lumbar spine L1–L4 measured. The mean difference in BMD (g/cm2; 95% CI) between CCS and controls was analysed. Odds ratios (OR; 95% CI) for low BMD were also calculated. Results: Overall, BMD in the CCS cohort did not significantly differ from controls. However, compared with eugonadal CCS, the CCS with untreated hypogonadism had lower BMD at the hip (mean difference − 0.139 (− 0.210; − 0.067); p < 0.001) and spine (− 0.102 (− 0.174; − 0.030); p = 0.006). They also had a higher risk of low hip BMD (OR 4.1 (1.3; 14); p = 0.018). CCS treated with cranial irradiation also had lower BMD (hip − 0.076 (− 0.133; − 0.019); p = 0.009; spine − 0.071 (− 0.124; − 0.018); p = 0.009) compared with controls. The latter associations remained statistically significant after adjustment for hypogonadism. Conclusions: CCS with hypogonadism or previously treated with cranial irradiation are at increased risk of impaired bone health. Prevention of osteoporosis should be considered as an important part in future follow-up of these men.
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6.
  • Isaksson, Sigrid, et al. (författare)
  • Risk of low bone mineral density in testicular germ cell cancer survivors : Association with hypogonadism and treatment modality
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Andrology. - : Wiley-Blackwell. - 2047-2919. ; 5:5, s. 898-904
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The cure rate of testicular cancer exceeds 95%, but testicular cancer survivors (TCS) are at increased risk of hypogonadism (HG). It has been suggested that TCS have reduced bone mineral density (BMD), but it is unclear whether this is related to HG or a direct effect of cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether TCS have decreased BMD, and if BMD is related to HG and/or the cancer treatment given. We investigated 91 TCS (mean age at diagnosis: 31 years; mean 9.3 years follow-up) and equal number of age matched controls (mean age at inclusion 40.3 years and 41.2 years, respectively). Total testosterone and LH were measured. BMD was determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Low BMD (LBD) was defined as Z-score <-1. Compared to eugonadal TCS, both TCS with untreated HG (mean difference: -0.063 g/cm2; 95% CI: -0.122; -0.004 p = 0.037) and TCS receiving androgen replacement (mean difference -0.085 g/cm2; 95% CI: -0.168; -0.003; p = 0.043) presented with statistically significantly 6-8% lower hip BMD. At the spine, L1-L4, an 8% difference reached the level of statistical significance only for those with untreated HG (mean difference: -0.097 g/cm2; 95% CI: -0.179; -0.014; p = 0.022). TCS with untreated HG had significantly increased OR for spine L1-L4 LBD (OR = 4.1; 95% CI: 1.3; 13; p = 0.020). The associations between the treatment given and BMD were statistically non-significant, both with and without adjustment for HG. In conclusion, TCS with HG are at increased risk of impaired bone health. Prevention of osteoporosis should be considered as an important part in future follow up of these men.
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