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Sökning: WFRF:(Carsin Anne Elie)

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  • Accordini, Simone, et al. (författare)
  • Incidence trends of airflow obstruction among European adults without asthma : a 20-year cohort study
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Scientific Reports. - : NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP. - 2045-2322. ; 10:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Investigating COPD trends may help healthcare providers to forecast future disease burden. We estimated sex- and smoking-specific incidence trends of pre-bronchodilator airflow obstruction (AO) among adults without asthma from 11 European countries within a 20-year follow-up (ECRHS and SAPALDIA cohorts). We also quantified the extent of misclassification in the definition based on pre-bronchodilator spirometry (using post-bronchodilator measurements from a subsample of subjects) and we used this information to estimate the incidence of post-bronchodilator AO (AO(post-BD)), which is the primary characteristic of COPD. AO incidence was 4.4 (95% CI: 3.5-5.3) male and 3.8 (3.1-4.6) female cases/1,000/year. Among ever smokers (median pack-years: 20, males; 12, females), AO incidence significantly increased with ageing in men only [incidence rate ratio (IRR), 1-year increase: 1.05 (1.03-1.07)]. A strong exposure-response relationship with smoking was found both in males [IRR, 1-pack-year increase: 1.03 (1.02-1.04)] and females [1.03 (1.02-1.05)]. The positive predictive value of AO for AO(post-BD) was 59.1% (52.0-66.2%) in men and 42.6% (35.1-50.1%) in women. AO(post-BD) incidence was 2.6 (1.7-3.4) male and 1.6 (1.0-2.2) female cases/1,000/year. AO incidence was considerable in Europe and the sex-specific ageing-related increase among ever smokers was strongly related to cumulative tobacco exposure. AO(post-BD) incidence is expected to be half of AO incidence.
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  • Adam, Martin, et al. (författare)
  • Adult lung function and long-term air pollution exposure. ESCAPE : a multicentre cohort study and meta-analysis
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 41:5, s. 38-50
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The chronic impact of ambient air pollutants on lung function in adults is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with lung function in adult participants from five cohorts in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Residential exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was modelled and traffic indicators were assessed in a standardised manner. The spirometric parameters forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) from 7613 subjects were considered as outcomes. Cohort-specific results were combined using meta-analysis. We did not observe an association of air pollution with longitudinal change in lung function, but we observed that a 10 μg·m(-3) increase in NO2 exposure was associated with lower levels of FEV1 (-14.0 mL, 95%CI -25.8- -2.1) and FVC (-14.9 mL, 95% CI -28.7- -1.1). An increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, but not other PM metrics (PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM, PM absorbance), was associated with a lower level of FEV1 (-44.6 mL, 95% CI -85.4- -3.8) and FVC (-59.0 mL, 95% CI -112.3- -5.6). The associations were particularly strong in obese persons. This study adds to the evidence for an adverse association of ambient air pollution with lung function in adults at very low levels in Europe.
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  • Bedard, Annabelle, et al. (författare)
  • Physical activity and lung function-Cause or consequence?
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: PLOS ONE. - : PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE. - 1932-6203. ; 15:8
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Concerns exist that the positive association of physical activity with better lung function, which has been suggested in previous longitudinal studies in smokers, is due to reverse causation. To investigate this, we applied structural equation modeling (SEM), an exploratory approach, and marginal structural modeling (MSM), an approach from the causal inference framework that corrects for reverse causation and time-dependent confounding and estimates causal effects, on data from participants in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS, a multicentre European cohort study initiated in 1991-1993 with ECRHS I, and with two follow-ups: ECRHS II in 1999-2003, and ECRHS III in 2010-2014). 753 subjects who reported current smoking at ECRHS II, with repeated data on lung function at ECRHS I, II and III, physical activity at ECRHS II and III, and potential confounders at ECRHS I and II, were included in the analyses. SEM showed positive associations between physical activity and lung function in both directions. MSM suggested a protectivecausaleffect of physical activity on lung function (overall difference in mean beta (95% CI), comparing active versus non-active individuals: 58 mL (21-95) for forced expiratory volume in one second and 83 mL (36-130) for forced vital capacity). Our results suggest bi-directional causation and support a true protective effect of physical activity on lung function in smokers, after accounting for reverse causation and time-dependent confounding.
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  • Burte, Emilie, et al. (författare)
  • Association between air pollution and rhinitis incidence in two European cohorts
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Environment International. - : Elsevier. - 0160-4120 .- 1873-6750. ; 115, s. 257-266
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The association between air pollution and rhinitis is not well established.Aim: The aim of this longitudinal analysis was to study the association between modeled air pollution at the subjects' home addresses and self-reported incidence of rhinitis.Methods: We used data from 1533 adults from two multicentre cohorts' studies (EGEA and ECRHS). Rhinitis incidence was defined as reporting rhinitis at the second follow-up (2011 to 2013) but not at the first follow-up (2000 to 2007). Annual exposure to NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 at the participants' home addresses was estimated using land-use regression models developed by the ESCAPE project for the 2009-2010 period. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were computed using Poisson regression. Pooled analysis, analyses by city and meta-regression testing for heterogeneity were carried out.Results: No association between long-term air pollution exposure and incidence of rhinitis was found (adjusted IRR (aIRR) for an increase of 10 mu g center dot m(-3) of NO2: 1.00 [0.91-1.09], for an increase of 5 mu g center dot m(-3) of PM2.5: 0.88 [0.73-1.04]). Similar results were found in the two-pollutant model (aIRR for an increase of 10 mu g center dot m(-3) of NO2: 1.01 [0.87-1.17], for an increase of 5 mu g center dot m(-3) of PM2.5: 0.87 [0.68-1.08]). Results differed depending on the city, but no regional pattern emerged for any of the pollutants.Conclusions: This study did not find any consistent evidence of an association between long-term air pollution and incident rhinitis.
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7.
  • Burte, Emilie, et al. (författare)
  • Long-term air pollution exposure is associated with increased severity of rhinitis in 2 European cohorts
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. - : Elsevier. - 0091-6749 .- 1097-6825. ; 145:3, s. 834-842.e6
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Very few studies have examined the association between long-term outdoor air pollution and rhinitis severity in adults.OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the cross-sectional association between individual long-term exposure to air pollution and severity of rhinitis.METHODS: Participants with rhinitis from 2 multicenter European cohorts (Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment on Asthma and the European Community Respiratory Health Survey) were included. Annual exposure to NO2, PM10, PM2.5, and PMcoarse (calculated by subtracting PM2.5 from PM10) was estimated using land-use regression models derived from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects project, at the participants' residential address. The score of rhinitis severity (range, 0-12), based on intensity of disturbance due to symptoms reported by questionnaire, was categorized into low (reference), mild, moderate, and high severity. Polytomous logistic regression models with a random intercept for city were used.RESULTS: A total of 1408 adults with rhinitis (mean age, 52 years; 46% men, 81% from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey) were included. The median (1st quartile-3rd quartile) score of rhinitis severity was 4 (2-6). Higher exposure to PM10 was associated with higher rhinitis severity (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI] for a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10: for mild: 1.20 [0.88-1.64], moderate: 1.53 [1.07-2.19], and high severity: 1.72 [1.23-2.41]). Similar results were found for PM2.5. Higher exposure to NO2 was associated with an increased severity of rhinitis, with similar adjusted odds ratios whatever the level of severity. Adjusted odds ratios were higher among participants without allergic sensitization than among those with, but interaction was found only for NO2. CONCLUSIONS: People with rhinitis who live in areas with higher levels of pollution are more likely to report more severe nasal symptoms. Further work is required to elucidate the mechanisms of this association.
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8.
  • Cai, Yutong, et al. (författare)
  • Cross-sectional associations between air pollution and chronic bronchitis : an ESCAPE meta-analysis across five cohorts
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Thorax. - 0040-6376 .- 1468-3296. ; 69:11, s. 1005-1014
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: This study aimed to assess associations of outdoor air pollution on prevalence of chronic bronchitis symptoms in adults in five cohort studies (Asthma-E3N, ECRHS, NSHD, SALIA, SAPALDIA) participating in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) project.METHODS: Annual average particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5, PMabsorbance, PMcoarse), NO2, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and road traffic measures modelled from ESCAPE measurement campaigns 2008-2011 were assigned to home address at most recent assessments (1998-2011). Symptoms examined were chronic bronchitis (cough and phlegm for ≥3 months of the year for ≥2 years), chronic cough (with/without phlegm) and chronic phlegm (with/without cough). Cohort-specific cross-sectional multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted using common confounder sets (age, sex, smoking, interview season, education), followed by meta-analysis.RESULTS: 15 279 and 10 537 participants respectively were included in the main NO2 and PM analyses at assessments in 1998-2011. Overall, there were no statistically significant associations with any air pollutant or traffic exposure. Sensitivity analyses including in asthmatics only, females only or using back-extrapolated NO2 and PM10 for assessments in 1985-2002 (ECRHS, NSHD, SALIA, SAPALDIA) did not alter conclusions. In never-smokers, all associations were positive, but reached statistical significance only for chronic phlegm with PMcoarse OR 1.31 (1.05 to 1.64) per 5 µg/m(3) increase and PM10 with similar effect size. Sensitivity analyses of older cohorts showed increased risk of chronic cough with PM2.5abs (black carbon) exposures.CONCLUSIONS: Results do not show consistent associations between chronic bronchitis symptoms and current traffic-related air pollution in adult European populations.
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9.
  • Carsin, Anne-Elie, et al. (författare)
  • Physical activity and incidence of restrictive spirometry pattern in adults
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - : European Respiratory Society. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 52
  • Tidskriftsartikel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Introduction: A restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Whether regular physical activity (PA) protects against this pattern has never been studied.Objective: To assess if PA is associated with the development of restrictive pattern.Methods: Lung function and PA were assessed in the second and third follow-up of the ECRHS (n=2757, 39-67 years) and SAPALDIA (n=2610, 36-82 y) cohorts. Subjects with restrictive or obstructive pattern at baseline were excluded. We assessed the association of being active at baseline (defined as exercising vigorously >2-3 times/wk for >1 h) and restrictive pattern at follow-up (defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC≥LLN and FVC<80% pred.) using modified Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking and asthma. We explored the impact of adjusting for baseline FVC. Additionally, models were repeated stratified by BMI.Results: After 10 years follow-up, 3.7% and 2.8% of participants developed a restrictive pattern, in ECRHS and SAPALDIA respectively. In both cohorts, being physically active was associated with lower risk of a restrictive pattern (meta-analysed RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.47-0.89). This association was stronger in overweight (0.41, 0.23-0.75) and obese (0.42, 0.17-1.05) than in normal weight subjects, but was attenuated when adjusting for baseline FVC (0.77, 0.58-1.04).Conclusion: In two large European studies, adults who reported more PA were at lower risk of developing a restrictive spirometry pattern. Lung function at baseline seemed to explain part of the observed association, stressing the need of adequate method to take into account both horse-racing and regression-to-the-means effects.
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10.
  • Carsin, Anne-Elie, et al. (författare)
  • Regular Physical Activity Levels and Incidence of Restrictive Spirometry Pattern : A Longitudinal Analysis of Two Population-based Cohorts
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Epidemiology. - : Oxford University Press. - 0002-9262 .- 1476-6256. ; 189:12, s. 1521-1528
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We estimated the association between regular physical activity and the incidence of restrictive spirometry pattern. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and physical activity were assessed in 2 population-based European cohorts (European Community Respiratory Health Survey: n = 2,757, aged 39–67 years; and Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults: n = 2,610, aged 36–82 years) first in 2000–2002 and again approximately 10 years later (2010–2013). Subjects with restrictive or obstructive spirometry pattern at baseline were excluded. We assessed the association of being active at baseline (defined as being physically active at least 2–3 times/week for ≥1 hour) with restrictive spirometry pattern at follow-up (defined as a postbronchodilation FEV1/FVC ratio of at least the lower limit of normal and FVC of <80% predicted) using modified Poisson regression, adjusting for relevant confounders. After 10 years of follow-up, 3.3% of participants had developed restrictive spirometry pattern. Being physically active was associated with a lower risk of developing this phenotype (relative risk = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.98). This association was stronger among those who were overweight and obese than among those of normal weight (P for interaction = 0.06). In 2 large European studies, adults practicing regular physical activity were at lower risk of developing restrictive spirometry pattern over 10 years.
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