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Sökning: WFRF:(Cerveri I.)

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1.
  • Canova, C., et al. (författare)
  • The influence of sensitisation to pollens and moulds on seasonal variations in asthma attacks
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 42:4, s. 935-945
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • No large study has described the seasonal variation in asthma attacks in population-based asthmatics in whom sensitisation to allergen has been measured. 2637 young adults with asthma living in 15 countries reported the months in which they usually had attacks of asthma and had skin-prick tests performed. Differences in seasonal patterns by sensitisation status were assessed using generalised estimating equations. Most young adults with asthma reported periods of the year when their asthma attacks were more common (range: 47% in Sweden to 86% in Spain). Seasonal variation in asthma was not modified by sensitisation to house dust mite or cat allergens. Asthmatics sensitised to grass, birch and Alternaria allergens had different seasonal patterns to those not sensitised to each allergen, with some geographical variation. In southern Europe, those sensitised to grass allergens were more likely to report attacks occurred in spring or summer than in winter (OR March/April 2.60, 95% CI 1.70-3.97; OR May/June 4.43, 95% CI 2.34-8.39) and smaller later peaks were observed in northern Europe (OR May/June 1.25, 95% CI 0.60-2.64; OR July/August 1.66, 95% CI 0.89-3.10). Asthmatics reporting hay fever but who were not sensitised to grass showed no seasonal variations. Seasonal variations in asthma attacks in young adults are common and are different depending on sensitisation to outdoor, but not indoor, allergens.
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2.
  • Accordini, S, et al. (författare)
  • The socio-economic burden of asthma is substantial in Europe
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. - 0105-4538 .- 1398-9995. ; 63:1, s. 116-124
  • Tidskriftsartikel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Few data are available on the asthma burden in the general population. We evaluated the level and the factors associated with the asthma burden in Europe. METHODS: In 1999-2002, 1152 adult asthmatics were identified in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS)-II and the socio-economic burden (reduced activity days and hospital services utilization in the past 12 months) was assessed. RESULTS: The asthmatics with a light burden (only a few reduced activity days) were 13.2% (95% CI: 11.4-15.3%), whereas those with a heavy burden (many reduced activity days and/or hospital services utilization) were 14.0% (95% CI: 12.1-16.1%). The burden was strongly associated with disease severity and a lower quality of life. Obese asthmatics had a significantly increased risk of a light [relative risk ratio (RRR) = 2.17; 95% CI: 1.18-4.00] or a heavy burden (RRR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.52-5.05) compared with normal/underweight subjects. The asthmatics with frequent respiratory symptoms showed a threefold (RRR = 2.74; 95% CI: 1.63-4.61) and sixfold (RRR = 5.76; 95% CI: 3.25-10.20) increased risk of a light or a heavy burden compared with asymptomatic asthmatics, respectively. Moreover, the lower the forced expiratory volume in 1 s % predicted, the higher the risk of a heavy burden. The coexistence with chronic cough/phlegm only increased the risk of a heavy burden (RRR = 1.88; 95% CI: 1.16-3.06). An interaction was found between gender and IgE sensitization, with nonatopic asthmatic females showing the highest risk of a heavy burden (21.6%; 95% CI: 16.9-27.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The asthma burden is substantial in Europe. A heavy burden is more common in asthmatics with obesity, frequent respiratory symptoms, low lung function, chronic cough/phlegm and in nonatopic females.
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  • Siroux, V., et al. (författare)
  • Quality-of-life and asthma-severity in general population asthmatics : results of the ECRHS II study
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. - 0105-4538 .- 1398-9995. ; 63:5, s. 547-554
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) has been poorly studied in large samples of asthmatics from the general population. HRQL and its relationship to asthma-severity were assessed among 900 asthmatics enrolled in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. METHODS: Among asthmatics, 864 completed the short form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire and 477 also completed the Asthma Quality-of-life Questionnaire (AQLQ). A 4-class asthma-severity scale, combining clinical items, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and the level of treatment and the different asthma-severity components (each of the clinical items and hospitalization) were studied in relation to HRQL. RESULTS: Mean SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores (45.5 and 48.8 respectively) were lower than expected in a general population. The mean total AQLQ score was 5.8. The AQLQ score and to a lesser extent the PCS score were significantly related to the 4-class asthma-severity scale, although the risk of having a lower HRQL score did not vary proportionally across the levels of severity. Asthma-severity had no impact on the MCS score. Asthma attack frequency and hospitalization were associated with both total AQLQ and PCS scores, whereas nocturnal symptoms and lung function were more strongly related to the AQLQ and PCS score respectively. CONCLUSION: In population-based asthmatics, the specific AQLQ questionnaire, and also to a lesser extent the generic SF-36 questionnaire, were sensitive to asthma-severity. Frequencies of asthma attacks, of nocturnal symptoms and hospitalization for asthma have independent impact on HRQL.
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5.
  • Anto, J. M., et al. (författare)
  • Risk factors of new-onset asthma in adults : a population-based international cohort study
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. - 0105-4538 .- 1398-9995. ; 65:8, s. 1021-1030
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • P>Background: The occurrence of new-onset asthma during adulthood is common, but there is insufficient understanding of its determinants including the role of atopy. Objective: To assess the risk factors for the development of new-onset asthma in middle-aged adults and to compare them according to atopy. Methods: A longitudinal analysis of 9175 young adults who participated in two surveys of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) conducted 9 years apart. Findings: We observed 179 cases of new-onset asthma among 4588 participants who were free of asthma and reported at the beginning of the follow-up that they had never had asthma (4.5 per 1000 person-years). In a logistic regression, the following risk factors were found to increase the risk of new-onset asthma: female gender (OR: 1.97; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38,2.81), bronchial hyperresponsiveness (3.25; 2.19,4.83), atopy (1.55;1.08,2.21), FEV1 < 100 % predicted (1.87;1.34,2.62), nasal allergy (1.98;1.39,2.84) and maternal asthma (1.91;1.13;3.21). Obesity, respiratory infections in early life and high-risk occupations increased the risk of new-onset asthma although we had limited power to confirm their role. Among the atopics, total IgE and sensitization to cat were independently related to the risk of new-onset asthma. The proportion of new-onset asthma attributable to atopy varied from 12% to 21%. Conclusion: Adults reporting that they had never had asthma were at a substantial risk of new-onset asthma as a result of multiple independent risk factors including lung function. Atopy explains a small proportion of new-onset adult asthma.
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6.
  • Carsin, Anne-Elie, et al. (författare)
  • Physical activity and incidence of restrictive spirometry pattern in adults
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - : European Respiratory Society. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 52
  • Tidskriftsartikel (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Introduction: A restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Whether regular physical activity (PA) protects against this pattern has never been studied.Objective: To assess if PA is associated with the development of restrictive pattern.Methods: Lung function and PA were assessed in the second and third follow-up of the ECRHS (n=2757, 39-67 years) and SAPALDIA (n=2610, 36-82 y) cohorts. Subjects with restrictive or obstructive pattern at baseline were excluded. We assessed the association of being active at baseline (defined as exercising vigorously >2-3 times/wk for >1 h) and restrictive pattern at follow-up (defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC≥LLN and FVC<80% pred.) using modified Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking and asthma. We explored the impact of adjusting for baseline FVC. Additionally, models were repeated stratified by BMI.Results: After 10 years follow-up, 3.7% and 2.8% of participants developed a restrictive pattern, in ECRHS and SAPALDIA respectively. In both cohorts, being physically active was associated with lower risk of a restrictive pattern (meta-analysed RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.47-0.89). This association was stronger in overweight (0.41, 0.23-0.75) and obese (0.42, 0.17-1.05) than in normal weight subjects, but was attenuated when adjusting for baseline FVC (0.77, 0.58-1.04).Conclusion: In two large European studies, adults who reported more PA were at lower risk of developing a restrictive spirometry pattern. Lung function at baseline seemed to explain part of the observed association, stressing the need of adequate method to take into account both horse-racing and regression-to-the-means effects.
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7.
  • Cerveri, I, et al. (författare)
  • What defines airflow obstruction in asthma?
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 34:3, s. 568-573
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Asthma guidelines from the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) and from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute provide conflicting definitions of airflow obstruction, suggesting a fixed forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))/forced vital capacity (FVC) cut-off point and the lower limit of normality (LLN), respectively. The LLN was recommended by the recent American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society guidelines on lung function testing. The problem in using fixed cut-off points is that they are set regardless of age and sex in an attempt to simplify diagnosis at the expense of misclassification. The sensitivity and specificity of fixed FEV(1)/FVC ratios of 0.70, 0.75 and 0.80 versus the LLN were evaluated in 815 subjects (aged 20-44 yrs) with a diagnosis of asthma within the framework of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. In males, the 0.70 ratio showed 76.5% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity, the 0.75 ratio 100.0% sensitivity and 92.4% specificity, and the 0.80 ratio 100.0% sensitivity but 58.1% specificity. In females, the 0.70 ratio showed 57.3% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity, the 0.75 ratio 91.5% sensitivity and 95.9% specificity, and the 0.80 ratio 100.0% sensitivity but 72.9% specificity. The fixed cut-off points cause a lot of misidentification of airflow obstruction in young adults, with overestimation with the 0.80 ratio and underestimation with the 0.70 ratio. In conclusion, the GINA guidelines should change their criteria for defining airflow obstruction.
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  • Marcon, A., et al. (författare)
  • Can an airway challenge test predict respiratory diseases? A population-based international study
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. - 0091-6749. ; 133:1, s. 104-110.e3
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Evidence on the longitudinal association of airway responsiveness with respiratory diseases is scarce. The best indicator of responsiveness is still undetermined. Objective: We investigated the association of airway responsiveness with the incidence of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and allergic rhinitis. Methods: We studied 3851 subjects who underwent spirometry and methacholine challenge tests both at baseline (1991-1993), when they were 20 to 44 years old, and at follow-up (1999-2002) in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Airway responsiveness was defined based on the methacholine dose-response slope on both occasions. Incidence rate ratios for the association of airway responsiveness with disease occurrence were computed by using Poisson regression. Results: With respect to reference (slope of the fourth quintile or greater), subjects with the greatest degree of airway responsiveness (slope less than the first quintile) showed the greatest risk of developing asthma, COPD, and allergic rhinitis (incidence rate ratios of 10.82, 5.53, and 4.84, respectively; all P <.01). A low slope predicted disease occurrence, even in subjects who did not reach a 20% decrease in FEV1 at the cumulative dose of 1 mg of methacholine (PD20 >1 mg). A decrease in slope over time was an independent predictor of disease risk. Conclusion: Airway responsiveness predicted new-onset asthma, COPD, and allergic rhinitis. Our study supports the use of a continuous noncensored indicator of airway responsiveness, such as the slope of the methacholine dose-response curve, in clinical practice and research because it showed clear advantages over PD20. © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.
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