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Sökning: WFRF:(Cerveri Isa)

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1.
  • Canova, C., et al. (författare)
  • The influence of sensitisation to pollens and moulds on seasonal variations in asthma attacks
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 42:4, s. 935-945
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • No large study has described the seasonal variation in asthma attacks in population-based asthmatics in whom sensitisation to allergen has been measured. 2637 young adults with asthma living in 15 countries reported the months in which they usually had attacks of asthma and had skin-prick tests performed. Differences in seasonal patterns by sensitisation status were assessed using generalised estimating equations. Most young adults with asthma reported periods of the year when their asthma attacks were more common (range: 47% in Sweden to 86% in Spain). Seasonal variation in asthma was not modified by sensitisation to house dust mite or cat allergens. Asthmatics sensitised to grass, birch and Alternaria allergens had different seasonal patterns to those not sensitised to each allergen, with some geographical variation. In southern Europe, those sensitised to grass allergens were more likely to report attacks occurred in spring or summer than in winter (OR March/April 2.60, 95% CI 1.70-3.97; OR May/June 4.43, 95% CI 2.34-8.39) and smaller later peaks were observed in northern Europe (OR May/June 1.25, 95% CI 0.60-2.64; OR July/August 1.66, 95% CI 0.89-3.10). Asthmatics reporting hay fever but who were not sensitised to grass showed no seasonal variations. Seasonal variations in asthma attacks in young adults are common and are different depending on sensitisation to outdoor, but not indoor, allergens.
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3.
  • Accordini, Simone, et al. (författare)
  • The Cost of Persistent Asthma in Europe : An International Population-Based Study in Adults
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology. - 1018-2438 .- 1423-0097. ; 160:1, s. 93-101
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: This study is aimed at providing a real-world evaluation of the economic cost of persistent asthma among European adults according to the degree of disease control [as defined by the 2006 Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines]. Methods: A prevalence-based cost-of-illness study was carried out on 462 patients aged 30-54 years with persistent asthma (according to the 2002 GINA definition), who were identified in general population samples from 11 European countries and examined in clinical settings in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II between 1999 and 2002. The cost estimates were computed from the societal perspective following the bottom-up approach on the basis of rates, wages and prices in 2004 (obtained at the national level from official sources), and were then converted to the 2010 values. Results: The mean total cost per patient was EUR 1,583 and was largely driven by indirect costs (i.e. lost working days and days with limited, not work-related activities 62.5%). The expected total cost in the population aged 30-54 years of the 11 European countries was EUR 4.3 billion (EUR 19.3 billion when extended to the whole European population aged from 15 to 64 years). The mean total cost per patient ranged from EUR 509 (controlled asthma) to EUR 2,281 (uncontrolled disease). Chronic cough or phlegm and having a high BMI significantly increased the individual total cost. Conclusions: Among European adults, the cost of persistent asthma drastically increases as disease control decreases. Therefore, substantial cost savings could be obtained through the proper management of adult patients in Europe.
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4.
  • Carsin, Anne-Elie, et al. (författare)
  • Regular Physical Activity Levels and Incidence of Restrictive Spirometry Pattern : A Longitudinal Analysis of Two Population-based Cohorts
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Epidemiology. - : Oxford University Press. - 0002-9262 .- 1476-6256. ; 189:12, s. 1521-1528
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We estimated the association between regular physical activity and the incidence of restrictive spirometry pattern. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and physical activity were assessed in 2 population-based European cohorts (European Community Respiratory Health Survey: n = 2,757, aged 39–67 years; and Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults: n = 2,610, aged 36–82 years) first in 2000–2002 and again approximately 10 years later (2010–2013). Subjects with restrictive or obstructive spirometry pattern at baseline were excluded. We assessed the association of being active at baseline (defined as being physically active at least 2–3 times/week for ≥1 hour) with restrictive spirometry pattern at follow-up (defined as a postbronchodilation FEV1/FVC ratio of at least the lower limit of normal and FVC of <80% predicted) using modified Poisson regression, adjusting for relevant confounders. After 10 years of follow-up, 3.3% of participants had developed restrictive spirometry pattern. Being physically active was associated with a lower risk of developing this phenotype (relative risk = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 0.98). This association was stronger among those who were overweight and obese than among those of normal weight (P for interaction = 0.06). In 2 large European studies, adults practicing regular physical activity were at lower risk of developing restrictive spirometry pattern over 10 years.
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5.
  • Carsin, Anne-Elie, et al. (författare)
  • Restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with low physical activity levels : A population based international study
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Respiratory Medicine. - : Elsevier. - 0954-6111 .- 1532-3064. ; 146, s. 116-123
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Introduction: Restrictive spirometry pattern is an under-recognised disorder with a poor morbidity and mortality prognosis. We compared physical activity levels between adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern and with normal spirometry.Methods: Restrictive spirometry pattern was defined as a having post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ≥ Lower Limit of Normal and a FVC<80% predicted in two population-based studies (ECRHS-III and SAPALDIA3). Physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The odds of having low physical activity (<1st study-specific tertile) was evaluated using adjusted logistic regression models.Results: Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern (n = 280/4721 in ECRHS, n = 143/3570 in SAPALDIA) reported lower levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry (median of 1770 vs 2253 MET·min/week in ECRHS, and 3519 vs 3945 MET·min/week in SAPALDIA). Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low physical activity (meta-analysis odds ratio: 1.41 [95%CI 1.07–1.86]) than those with a normal spirometry. Obesity, respiratory symptoms, co-morbidities and previous physical activity levels did not fully explain this finding.Conclusion: Adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry. These results highlight the need to identify and act on this understudied but prevalent condition.
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6.
  • Carsin, Anne-Elie, et al. (författare)
  • Restrictive spirometry pattern is associated with low physical activity levels. A population based international study
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Respiratory Medicine. - : W B SAUNDERS CO LTD. - 0954-6111 .- 1532-3064. ; 146, s. 116-123
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Introduction: Restrictive spirometry pattern is an under-recognised disorder with a poor morbidity and mortality prognosis. We compared physical activity levels between adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern and with normal spirometry.Methods: Restrictive spirometry pattern was defined as a having post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC >= Lower Limit of Normal and a FVC< 80% predicted in two population-based studies (ECRHS-III and SAPALDIA3). Physical activity was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. The odds of having low physical activity (< 1st study-specific tertile) was evaluated using adjusted logistic regression models.Results: Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern (n = 280/4721 in ECRHS, n = 143/3570 in SAPALDIA) reported lower levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry (median of 1770 vs 2253 MET.min/week in ECRHS, and 3519 vs 3945 MET.min/week in SAPALDIA). Subjects with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low physical activity (meta-analysis odds ratio: 1.41 [95% CI 1.07-1.86]) than those with a normal spirometry. Obesity, respiratory symptoms, co-morbidities and previous physical activity levels did not fully explain this finding.Conclusion: Adults with a restrictive spirometry pattern were more likely to report low levels of physical activity than those with normal spirometry. These results highlight the need to identify and act on this understudied but prevalent condition.
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7.
  • Cazzoletti, Lucia, et al. (författare)
  • Asthma control in Europe : a real-world evaluation based on an international population-based study
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. - 0091-6749 .- 1097-6825. ; 120:6, s. 1360-1367
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Epidemiologic evidence related to asthma control in   patients from the general population is scanty. Objectives: We sought to assess asthma control in several European   centers according to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines   and to investigate its determinants. Methods: In the European Community Respiratory Health Survey 11   (1999-2002), 1241 adults with asthma were identified and classified   into inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) users and non-ICS users in the last   year. Control was assessed in both groups by using the GINA proposal   (controlled, partly controlled, and uncontrolled asthma), and it was   related to potential determinants. Results: Only 15% (95% CI, 12% to 19%) of subjects who had used ICSs in   the last year and 45% (95% CI, 41% to 50%) of non-ICS users had their   asthma under control; individuals with uncontrolled asthma accounted   for 49% (95% CI, 44% to 53%) and 18% (95% CI, 15% to 21%),   respectively. Among ICS users, the prevalence of uncontrolled asthma   showed great variability across Europe, ranging from 20% (95% CI, 7% to   41%; Iceland) to 67% (95% CI, 35% to 90%; Italy). Overweight status, chronic cough and phlegm, and sensitization to Cladosporium species   were associated with poor control in ICS users. About 65% and 87% of   ICS users with uncontrolled and partly controlled asthma, respectively,   were on a medication regimen that was less than recommended by the GINA   guidelines. Conclusion: Six of 7 European asthmatic adults using ICSs in the last   year did not achieve good disease control. The large majority of   subjects with poorly controlled asthma were using antiasthma drugs in a   suboptimal way. A wide variability in asthma control emerged across   Europe. Clinical implications: Greater attention should be paid to asthma management and to the implementation of the GINA guidelines.
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8.
  • Cazzoletti, Lucia, et al. (författare)
  • Asthma Severity According to Global Initiative for Asthma and Its Determinants : An International Study
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology. - 1018-2438 .- 1423-0097. ; 151:1, s. 70-79
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: The identification of the factors associated with severe asthma may shed some light on its etiology and on the mechanisms of its development. We aimed to describe asthma severity using the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification and to investigate its determinants in a cross-sectional, population-based sample in Europe. Methods: In the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II (1999-2002), 1,241 adults with asthma were identified. Severity was assessed using the 2002 GINA classification (intermittent, mild persistent, moderate persistent, severe persistent) and it was related to potential determinants by a multinomial logistic model, using the intermittent group as the reference category for relative risk ratios. Results: About 30% of asthmatic subjects were affected by moderate-to-severe asthma. Sensitization to Cladosporium was associated with a more than 5-fold greater risk of having (mild, moderate or severe) persistent asthma than intermittent asthma. Persistent asthma was positively associated with sensitization to house dust mite, nonseasonal asthma, an older age at asthma onset, and chronic cough and phlegm. Sensitization to cat increased the risk of severe asthma only. Smoking was more strongly associated with asthma severity in men, while rhinitis was more strongly associated with asthma severity in women. Conclusions: One third of the asthmatic population have moderate-to-severe asthma. Sensitization to perennial indoor allergens, particularly Cladosporium, is strongly associated with asthma severity. The role of smoking and rhinitis in determining asthma severity may differ between the sexes, and it should be further investigated. Copyright (C) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel
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9.
  • Cerveri, Isa, et al. (författare)
  • The Impact of Cigarette Smoking on Asthma : A Population-Based International Cohort Study
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology. - 1018-2438 .- 1423-0097. ; 158:2, s. 175-183
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: The prevalence rates of smoking in subjects with asthma have frequently been reported as similar to those in the general population; however, available data are not up-to-date. There is only limited and somewhat conflicting information on the long-term effects of smoking on health outcomes among population-based cohorts of subjects with asthma. We aimed to investigate changes in smoking habits and their effects on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) in subjects with asthma in comparison with the rest of the population, focusing on the healthy smoker effect. Methods: We studied 9,092 subjects without asthma and 1,045 with asthma at baseline who participated in both the European Community Respiratory Health Survey I (20-44 years old in 1991-1993) and II (1999-2002). Results: At follow-up, smoking was significantly less frequent among subjects with asthma than in the rest of the population (26 vs. 31%; p < 0.001). Subjects with asthma who were already ex-smokers at the beginning of the follow-up in the 1990s had the highest mean asthma score (number of reported asthma-like symptoms, range 0-5), probably as a result of the healthy smoker effect (2.80 vs. 2.44 in never smokers, 2.19 in quitters and 2.24 in smokers; p < 0.001). The influence of smoking on FEV(1) decline did not depend on asthma status. Smokers had the highest proportion of subjects with chronic cough/phlegm (p < 0.01). Conclusion: One out of 4 subjects with asthma continues smoking and reports significantly more chronic cough and phlegm than never smokers and ex-smokers. This stresses the importance of smoking cessation in all patients with asthma, even in those with less severe asthma.
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10.
  • Cerveri, Isa, et al. (författare)
  • Underestimation of airflow obstruction among young adults using FEV1/FVC<70% as a fixed cut-off : a longitudinal evaluation of clinical and functional outcomes
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Thorax. - 0040-6376 .- 1468-3296. ; 63:12, s. 1040-1045
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Early detection of airflow obstruction is particularly important among young adults because they are more likely to benefit from intervention. Using the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) to forced vital capacity (FVC) (FEV1/FVC) <70% fixed ratio, airflow obstruction may be underdiagnosed. The lower limit of normal (LLN), which is statistically defined by the lower fifth percentile of a reference population, is physiologically appropriate but it still needs a clinical validation.Methods: To evaluate the characteristics and longitudinal outcomes of subjects misidentified as normal by the fixed ratio with respect to the LLN, 6249 participants (aged 20-44 years) in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey were examined and divided into three groups (absence of airflow obstruction by the LLN and the fixed ratio; presence of airflow obstruction only by the LLN; presence of airflow obstruction by the two criteria) for 1991-1993. LLN equations were obtained from normal non-smoking participants. A set of clinical and functional outcomes was evaluated in 1999-2002.Results: The misidentified subjects were 318 (5.1%); only 45.6% of the subjects with airflow obstruction by the LLN were also identified by the fixed cut-off. At baseline, FEV1 (107%, 97%, 85%) progressively decreased and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (slope 7.84, 6.32, 5.57) progressively increased across the three groups. During follow-up, misidentified subjects had a significantly higher risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a significantly higher use of health resources (medicines, emergency department visits/hospital admissions) because of breathing problems than subjects without airflow obstruction (p<0.001).Conclusions: Our findings show the importance of using statistically derived spirometric criteria to identify airflow obstruction.
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