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Sökning: WFRF:(Colditz GA)

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1.
  • Cho, Eunyoung, et al. (författare)
  • Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer : a pooled analysis of 8 cohort studies
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: Annals of Internal Medicine. - 0003-4819 .- 1539-3704. ; 140:8, s. 603-613
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have generally reported positive associations between alcohol consumption and risk for colorectal cancer. However, findings related to specific alcoholic beverages or different anatomic sites in the large bowel have been inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of total alcohol intake and intake from specific beverages to the incidence of colorectal cancer and to evaluate whether other potential risk factors modify the association. DESIGN: Pooled analysis of primary data from 8 cohort studies in 5 countries. SETTING: North America and Europe. PARTICIPANTS: 489,979 women and men with no history of cancer other than nonmelanoma skin cancer at baseline. MEASUREMENTS: Alcohol intake was assessed in each study at baseline by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: During a maximum of 6 to 16 years of follow-up across the studies, 4687 cases of colorectal cancer were documented. In categorical analyses, increased risk for colorectal cancer was limited to persons with an alcohol intake of 30 g/d or greater (approximately > or =2 drinks/d), a consumption level reported by 4% of women and 13% of men. Compared with nondrinkers, the pooled multivariate relative risks were 1.16 (95% CI, 0.99 to 1.36) for persons who consumed 30 to less than 45 g/d and 1.41 (CI, 1.16 to 1.72) for those who consumed 45 g/d or greater. No significant heterogeneity by study or sex was observed. The association was evident for cancer of the proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum. No clear difference in relative risks was found among specific alcoholic beverages. LIMITATIONS: The study included only one measure of alcohol consumption at baseline and could not investigate lifetime alcohol consumption, alcohol consumption at younger ages, or changes in alcohol consumption during follow-up. It also could not examine drinking patterns or duration of alcohol use. CONCLUSIONS: A single determination of alcohol intake correlated with a modest relative elevation in colorectal cancer rate, mainly at the highest levels of alcohol intake.
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2.
  • Cho, E, et al. (författare)
  • Dairy foods, calcium, and colorectal cancer : A pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies
  • 2004
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Channing Lab, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Lab, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Loma Linda Univ, Ctr Hlth Res, Sch Med, Loma Linda, CA USA. Maastricht Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Maastricht, Netherlands. Harvard Ctr Canc Prevent, Boston, MA USA. Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA. SUNY Buffalo, Dept Social & Prevent Med, Buffalo, NY USA. TNO, Nutr & Food Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, Zeist, Netherlands. Univ Toronto, Fac Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada. Natl Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Hlth Promot, Helsinki, Finland. Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Canc Prevent Res Program, Seattle, WA USA. Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA. Natl Inst Environm Hlth Sci, Epidemiol Branch, Res Triangle Pk, NC USA. NYU, Dept Obstet Gynecol, Sch Med, New York, NY USA. Natl Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden. NYU, Sch Med, Nelson Inst Environm Med & Kaplan Canc Ctr, New York, NY USA. : OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. - 0027-8874 .- 1460-2105. ; 96:13, s. 1015-1022
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background. Studies in animals have suggested that calcium may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. However, results from epidemiologic studies of intake of calcium or dairy foods and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods: We pooled the primary data from 10 cohort studies in five countries that assessed usual dietary intake by using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline. For most studies, follow-up was extended beyond that in the original publication. The studies included 534 536 individuals, among whom 4992 incident cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed between 6 and 16 years of follow-up. Pooled multivariable relative risks for categories of milk intake and quintiles of calcium intake and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Milk intake was related to a reduced risk of colorectal cancer. Compared with the lowest category of intake (<70 g/day), relative risks of colorectal cancer for increasing categories (70-174, 175-249, and greater than or equal to250 g/day) of milk intake were 0.94 (95% CI = 0.86 to 1.02), 0.88 (95% CI = 0.81 to 0.96), and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.78 to 0.94), respectively (P-trend<.001). Calcium intake was also inversely related to the risk of colorectal cancer. The relative risk for the highest versus the lowest quintile of intake was 0.86 (95% CI = 0.78 to 0.95; P-trend = .02) for dietary calcium and 0.78 (95% CI = 0.69 to 0.88; P-trend<.001) for total calcium (combining dietary and supplemental sources). These results were consistent across studies and sex. The inverse association for milk was limited to cancers of the distal colon (P-trend<.001) and rectum (P-trend = .02). Conclusion: Higher consumption of milk and calcium is associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer.
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3.
  • Genkinger, J M, et al. (författare)
  • A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer
  • 2006
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Lab, Boston, MA USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Harvard Ctr Canc Prevent, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA. Loma Linda Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Hlth Res, Loma Linda, CA USA. Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA. SUNY Buffalo, Dept Social & Prevent Med, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA. : SPRINGER. - 0957-5243 .- 1573-7225. ; 17:3, s. 273-285
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Fat and cholesterol are theorized to promote ovarian carcinogenesis by increasing circulating estrogen levels. Although case-control studies have reported positive associations between total and saturated fat intake and ovarian cancer risk, two cohort studies have observed null associations. Dietary cholesterol and eggs have been positively associated with ovarian cancer risk. A pooled analysis was conducted on 12 cohort studies. Among 523,217 women, 2,132 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, and then pooled using a random effects model. Total fat intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (pooled multivariate RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.86-1.34 comparing >= 45 to 30-< 35% of calories). No association was observed for monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans-unsaturated, animal and vegetable fat, cholesterol and egg intakes with ovarian cancer risk. A weakly positive, but non-linear association, was observed for saturated fat intake (pooled multivariate RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01-1.66 comparing highest versus lowest decile). Results for histologic subtypes were similar. Overall, fat, cholesterol and egg intakes were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. The positive association for saturated fat intake at very high intakes merits further investigation.
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4.
  • Kim, Dong-Hyun, et al. (författare)
  • Pooled analyses of 13 prospective cohort studies on folate intake and colon cancer
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Cancer Causes and Control. - : SPRINGER. - 0957-5243 .- 1573-7225. ; 21:11, s. 1919-1930
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Studies of folate intake and colorectal cancer risk have been inconsistent. We examined the relation with colon cancer risk in a series of 13 prospective studies. Study- and sex-specific relative risks (RRs) were estimated from the primary data using Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random-effects model. Among 725,134 participants, 5,720 incident colon cancers were diagnosed during follow-up. The pooled multivariate RRs (95% confidence interval [CI]) comparing the highest vs. lowest quintile of intake were 0.92 (95% CI 0.84-1.00, p-value, test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.85) for dietary folate and 0.85 (95% CI 0.77-0.95, p-value, test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.42) for total folate. Results for total folate intake were similar in analyses using absolute intake cutpoints (pooled multivariate RR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.78-0.98, comparing a parts per thousand yen560 mcg/days vs. < 240 mcg/days, p-value, test for trend = 0.009). When analyzed as a continuous variable, a 2% risk reduction (95% CI 0-3%) was estimated for every 100 mu g/day increase in total folate intake. These data support the hypothesis that higher folate intake is modestly associated with reduced risk of colon cancer.
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5.
  • Koushik, A, et al. (författare)
  • Fruits and vegetables and ovarian cancer risk in a pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. - Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Lab, Boston, MA USA. Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Div Prevent Med, Boston, MA USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA. Harvard Univ, Ctr Canc Prevent, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, Minneapolis, MN 55455 USA. NYU, Sch Med, Div Epidemiol, Dept Environm Med, New York, NY USA. NYU, Sch Med, Div Biostat, Dept Environm Med, New York, NY USA. Loma Linda Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Hlth Res, Loma Linda, CA USA. Maastricht Univ, Dept Epidemiol, Maastricht, Netherlands. Mayo Clin & Mayo Fdn, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Coll Med, Rochester, MN 55905 USA. SUNY Buffalo, Dept Social & Prevent Med, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA. TNO, Nutr & Food Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, Zeist, Netherlands. Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Natl Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden. NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA. Amer Canc Soc, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA. Univ Toronto, Fac Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Toronto, ON, Canada. Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol & Populat Hlth, Bronx, NY 10467 USA. : AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH. - 1055-9965 .- 1538-7755. ; 14:9, s. 2160-2167
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Because fruits and vegetables are rich in bioactive compounds with potential cancer-preventive actions, increased consumption may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer. Evidence on the association between fruit and vegetable intake and ovarian cancer risk has not been consistent. We analyzed and pooled the primary data from 12 prospective studies in North America and Europe. Fruit and vegetable intake was measured at baseline in each study using a validated food frequency questionnaire. To summarize the association between fruit and vegetable intake and ovarian cancer, study-specific relative risks (RR) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model, and then combined using a random-effects model. Among 560,441 women, 2,130 cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer occurred during a maximum follow-up of 7 to 22 years across studies. Total fruit intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk-the pooled multivariate RR for the highest versus the lowest quartile of intake was 1.06 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.92-1.21; P value, test for trend = 0.73; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.741. Similarly, results for total vegetable intake indicated no significant association (pooled multivariate RR, 0.90; 95% Cl, 0.78-1.04, for the highest versus the lowest quartile; P value, test for trend = 0.06; P value, test for between-studies heterogeneity = 0.31). Intakes of botanically defined fruit and vegetable groups and individual fruits and vegetables were also not associated with ovarian cancer risk. Associations for total fruits and vegetables were similar for different histologic types. These results suggest that fruit and vegetable consumption in adulthood has no important association with the risk of ovarian cancer.
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6.
  • Mannisto, Satu, et al. (författare)
  • Dietary carotenoids and risk of colorectal cancer in a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Epidemiology. - Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Promot & Chron Dis Prevent, Helsinki 00300, Finland. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Harvard Univ, Ctr Canc Prevent, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden. NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA. Maastricht Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Maastricht, Netherlands. Mayo Clin, Coll Med, Rochester, MN USA. SUNY Buffalo, Univ Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260 USA. Dana Farber Canc Inst, Boston, MA 02115 USA. TNO Qual Life, Zeist, Netherlands. Univ Minnesota, Sch Publ Hlth, Minneapolis, MN USA. Amer Canc Soc, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA. Univ Toronto, Fac Med, Toronto, ON, Canada. Albert Einstein Coll Med, Bronx, NY 10467 USA. : OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. - 0002-9262 .- 1476-6256. ; 165:3, s. 246-255
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Dietary carotenoids have been hypothesized to protect against epithelial cancers. The authors analyzed the associations between intakes of specific carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein + zeaxanthin, and lycopene) and risk of colorectal cancer using the primary data from 11 cohort studies carried out in North America and Europe. Carotenoid intakes were estimated from food frequency questionnaires administered at baseline in each study. During 6-20 years of follow-up between 1980 and 2003, 7,885 incident cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed among 702,647 participants. The authors calculated study-specific multivariate relative risks and then combined them using a random-effects model. In general, intakes of specific carotenoids were not associated with colorectal cancer risk. The pooled multivariate relative risks of colorectal cancer comparing the highest quintile of intake with the lowest ranged from 0.92 for lutein + zeaxanthin to 1.04 for lycopene; only for lutein + zeaxanthin intake was the result borderline statistically significant (95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.00). The associations observed were generally similar across studies, for both sexes, and for colon cancer and rectal cancer. These pooled data did not suggest that carotenoids play an important role in the etiology of colorectal cancer.
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7.
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8.
  • Suzuki, R, et al. (författare)
  • Alcohol and postmenopausal breast cancer risk defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status : A prospective cohort study
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. - Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Natl Inst Environm Med, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hosp, Dept Surg & Breast Oncol, Tokyo Metropolitan Canc & Infect Dis Ctr, Tokyo, Japan. Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA. Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Lab, Boston, MA 02115 USA. : OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC. - 0027-8874 .- 1460-2105. ; 97:21, s. 1601-1608
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Alcohol intake has been reported to be positively associated with an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer; however, the association with the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of the breast tumors remains unclear. Methods: Self-reported data on alcohol consumption were collected in 1987 and 1997 from 51847 postmenopausal women in the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort. Through June 30,2004,1188 invasive breast cancer case patients with known ER and PR status were identified during an average 8.3-year follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable relative risks (RRs) of breast cancer, adjusting for age; family history of breast cancer; body mass index; height; parity; age at menarche, first birth, and menopause; education level; use of postmenopausal hormones; and diet. Heterogeneity among groups was evaluated using the Wald test. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Alcohol consumption was associated with an increased risk for the development of ER-positive (+) tumors, irrespective of PR status (highest intake [ >= 10 g of alcohol per day] versus nondrinkers, multivariable RR = 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.80; P-trend < .049 for ER+PR+ tumors; and RR = 2.36, 95% CI = 1.56 to 3.56; P-trend < .001 for ER+PR-tumors). The absolute rate of ER+ breast cancer (standardized to the age distribution of person-years experienced by all study participants using 5-year age categories) was 232 per 100000 person-years among women in the highest category of alcohol intake, and 158 per 100000 person-years among nondrinkers. No association was observed between alcohol intake and the risk of developing ER-tumors. Furthermore, we observed a statistically significant interaction between alcohol intake and the use of postmenopausal hormones on the risk for ER+PR+ tumors (P-interaction = .039). Conclusion: The observed association between risk of developing postmenopausal ER+ breast cancer and alcohol drinking, especially among those women who use postmenopausal hormones, may be important, because the majority of breast tumors among postmenopausal women overexpress ER.
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9.
  • Teras, Lauren R., et al. (författare)
  • Body size and multiple myeloma mortality : a pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Haematology. - : WILEY-BLACKWELL. - 0007-1048 .- 1365-2141. ; 166:5, s. 667-676
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Multiple myeloma (MM) is a rare but highly fatal malignancy. High body weight is associated with this cancer, but several questions remain regarding the aetiological relevance of timing and location of body weight. To address these questions, we conducted a pooled analysis of MM mortality using 1.5 million participants (including 1388 MM deaths) from 20 prospective cohorts in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. Proportional hazards regression was used to calculate pooled multivariate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Associations with elevated MM mortality were observed for higher early-adult body mass index (BMI; HR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.09-1.35 per 5 kg/m(2)) and for higher cohort-entry BMI (HR 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03-1.16 per 5 kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (HR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10 per 5 cm). In analyses of the joint effect of young adult and baseline BMI, women who were the heaviest, both in early adulthood (BMI 25+) and at cohort entry (BMI 30+) were at greater risk compared to those with BMI 18.5 = 25 at both time points (HR = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.33-2.86) but there was no significant association in men. Waist-to-hip ratio and height were not associated with MM mortality. These observations suggest that overall, and possibly also central, obesity influence myeloma mortality, and women have the highest risk of death from this cancer if they remain heavy throughout adulthood.
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10.
  • Wang, Zhaoming, et al. (författare)
  • Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Human Molecular Genetics. - 0964-6906 .- 1460-2083. ; 23:24, s. 6616-6633
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.
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