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Sökning: WFRF:(Firbank M)

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1.
  • Macfarlane, M. D., et al. (författare)
  • Shape abnormalities of the caudate nucleus correlate with poorer gait and balance: Results from a subset of the ladis study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry. - 1064-7481. ; 23:1, s. 59-U90
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective Functional deficits seen in several neurodegenerative disorders have been linked with dysfunction in frontostriatal circuits and with associated shape alterations in striatal structures. The severity of visible white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging has been found to correlate with poorer performance on measures of gait and balance. This study aimed to determine whether striatal volume and shape changes were correlated with gait dysfunction. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging scans and clinical gait/balance data (scores from the Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB]) were sourced from 66 subjects in the previously published LADIS trial, performed in nondisabled individuals older than age 65 years with WMHs at study entry. Data were obtained at study entry and at 3-year follow-up. Caudate nuclei and putamina were manually traced using a previously published method and volumes calculated. The relationships between volume and physical performance on the SPPB were investigated with shape analysis using the spherical harmonic shape description toolkit. Results There was no correlation between the severity of WMHs and striatal volumes. Caudate nuclei volume correlated with performance on the SPPB at baseline but not at follow-up, with subsequent shape analysis showing left caudate changes occurred in areas corresponding to inputs of the dorsolateral prefrontal, premotor, and motor cortex. There was no correlation between putamen volumes and performance on the SPPB. Conclusion Disruption in frontostriatal circuits may play a role in mediating poorer physical performance in individuals with WMHs. Striatal volume and shape changes may be suitable biomarkers for functional changes in this population. © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.
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  • Firbank, M. J., et al. (författare)
  • Relationship between progression of brain white matter changes and late-life depression: 3-year results from the LADIS study
  • 2012
  • Ingår i: British Journal of Psychiatry. - 0007-1250. ; 201:1, s. 40-45
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Brain white matter changes (WMC) and depressive symptoms are linked, but the directionality of this association remains unclear. Aims To investigate the relationship between baseline and incident depression and progression of white matter changes. Method In a longitudinal multicentre pan-European study (Leukoaraiosis and Disability in the elderly, LADIS), participants aged over 64 underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical assessments. Repeat scans were obtained at 3 years. Depressive outcomes were assessed in terms of depressive episodes and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Progression of WMC was measured using the modified Rotterdam Progression scale. Results Progression of WMC was significantly associated with incident depression during year 3 of the study (P = 0.002) and remained significant after controlling for transition to disability, baseline WMC and baseline history of depression. There was no significant association between progression of WMC and GDS score, and no significant relationship between progression of WMC and history of depression at baseline. Conclusions Our results support the vascular depression hypothesis and implicate WMC as causal in the pathogenesis of late-life depression.
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  • Teodorczuk, A., et al. (författare)
  • Relationship between baseline white-matter changes and development of late-life depressive symptoms: 3-year results from the LADIS study.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: Psychological medicine. - 1469-8978. ; 40:4, s. 603-610
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that cerebral white-matter changes and depressive symptoms are linked directly along the causal pathway. We investigated whether baseline severity of cerebral white-matter changes predict longer-term future depressive outcomes in a community sample of non-disabled older adults.MethodIn the Leukoaraiosis and Disability in the Elderly (LADIS) study, a longitudinal multi-centre pan-European study, 639 older subjects underwent baseline structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical assessments. Baseline severity of white-matter changes was quantified volumetrically. Depressive outcomes were assessed in terms of depressive episodes and depressive symptoms, as measured by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Subjects were clinically reassessed annually for up to 3 years. Regression models were constructed to determine whether baseline severity of white-matter changes predicted future depressive outcomes, after controlling for confounding factors. RESULTS: Baseline severity of white-matter changes independently predicted depressive symptoms at both 2 (p<0.001) and 3 years (p=0.015). Similarly, white-matter changes predicted incident depression (p=0.02). Over the study period the population became significantly more disabled (p<0.001). When regression models were adjusted to account for the influence of the prospective variable transition to disability, baseline severity of white-matter changes no longer predicted depressive symptoms at 3 years (p=0.09) or incident depression (p=0.08). CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the vascular depression hypothesis and strongly implicate white-matter changes in the pathogenesis of late-life depression. Furthermore, the findings indicate that, over time, part of the relationship between white-matter changes and depression may be mediated by loss of functional activity.
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  • Firbank, Michael J, et al. (författare)
  • White matter hyperintensities and depression--preliminary results from the LADIS study.
  • 2005
  • Ingår i: International journal of geriatric psychiatry. - 0885-6230. ; 20:7, s. 674-9
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: White matter hyperintensities have been associated with the development of depression in older subjects, though the details of this relationship are not fully understood. METHODS: In a pan-European multicentre study of 629 older subjects, we examined the relationship between MRI white matter hyperintensities (WMH), depressive symptoms and self perceived health quality of life (QOL). WMH were rated using a three-point scale. RESULTS: We found depressive symptoms as assessed by the geriatric depression 15-item scale to be associated with WMH rating (Spearman's rho 0.11, p = 0.008) and also with the Euro-QOL health score (Spearman's rho -0.5, p < 0.001). In a ordinal logistic regression model, QOL was found to strongly predict GDS score (p < 0.001) and severe vs mild WMH were associated with increased depression (p = 0.028). The relationship between history of severe depression and WMH score was examined, but there were no differences either between those with and without a history of severe depression, or those with an early vs late onset of depression. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that WMH play a role in increasing depressive symptoms, even when perceived quality of life is controlled for as a possible mediating factor.
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  • Green, Jonathan M. H., et al. (författare)
  • Research priorities for managing the impacts and dependencies of business upon food, energy, water and the environment
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Sustainability Science. - 1862-4065 .- 1862-4057. ; 12:2, s. 319-331
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Delivering access to sufficient food, energy and water resources to ensure human wellbeing is a major concern for governments worldwide. However, it is crucial to account for the 'nexus' of interactions between these natural resources and the consequent implications for human wellbeing. The private sector has a critical role in driving positive change towards more sustainable nexus management and could reap considerable benefits from collaboration with researchers to devise solutions to some of the foremost sustainability challenges of today. Yet opportunities are missed because the private sector is rarely involved in the formulation of deliverable research priorities. We convened senior research scientists and influential business leaders to collaboratively identify the top forty questions that, if answered, would best help companies understand and manage their food-energy-water-environment nexus dependencies and impacts. Codification of the top order nexus themes highlighted research priorities around development of pragmatic yet credible tools that allow businesses to incorporate nexus interactions into their decision-making; demonstration of the business case for more sustainable nexus management; identification of the most effective levers for behaviour change; and understanding incentives or circumstances that allow individuals and businesses to take a leadership stance. Greater investment in the complex but productive relations between the private sector and research community will create deeper and more meaningful collaboration and cooperation.
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