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Sökning: WFRF:(Hoffman Wolfgang)

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1.
  • Hibar, Derrek P., et al. (författare)
  • Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Nature. - 0028-0836 .- 1476-4687. ; 520:7546, s. 224-U216
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume(5) and intracranial volume(6). These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 X 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.
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3.
  • Lango Allen, Hana, et al. (författare)
  • Hundreds of variants clustered in genomic loci and biological pathways affect human height.
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Nature. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 1476-4687 .- 0028-0836. ; 467:7317, s. 832-8
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence the phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified more than 600 variants associated with human traits, but these typically explain small fractions of phenotypic variation, raising questions about the use of further studies. Here, using 183,727 individuals, we show that hundreds of genetic variants, in at least 180 loci, influence adult height, a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait. The large number of loci reveals patterns with important implications for genetic studies of common human diseases and traits. First, the 180 loci are not random, but instead are enriched for genes that are connected in biological pathways (P = 0.016) and that underlie skeletal growth defects (P < 0.001). Second, the likely causal gene is often located near the most strongly associated variant: in 13 of 21 loci containing a known skeletal growth gene, that gene was closest to the associated variant. Third, at least 19 loci have multiple independently associated variants, suggesting that allelic heterogeneity is a frequent feature of polygenic traits, that comprehensive explorations of already-discovered loci should discover additional variants and that an appreciable fraction of associated loci may have been identified. Fourth, associated variants are enriched for likely functional effects on genes, being over-represented among variants that alter amino-acid structure of proteins and expression levels of nearby genes. Our data explain approximately 10% of the phenotypic variation in height, and we estimate that unidentified common variants of similar effect sizes would increase this figure to approximately 16% of phenotypic variation (approximately 20% of heritable variation). Although additional approaches are needed to dissect the genetic architecture of polygenic human traits fully, our findings indicate that GWA studies can identify large numbers of loci that implicate biologically relevant genes and pathways.
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4.
  • Dand, Nick, et al. (författare)
  • Exome-wide association study reveals novel psoriasis susceptibility locus at TNFSF15 and rare protective alleles in genes contributing to type I IFN signalling
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Human Molecular Genetics. - : OXFORD UNIV PRESS. - 0964-6906 .- 1460-2083. ; 26:21, s. 4301-4313
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disorder for which multiple genetic susceptibility loci have been identified, but few resolved to specific functional variants. In this study, we sought to identify common and rare psoriasis-associated gene-centric variation. Using exome arrays we genotyped four independent cohorts, totalling 11 861 psoriasis cases and 28 610 controls, aggregating the dataset through statistical meta-analysis. Single variant analysis detected a previously unreported risk locus at TNFSF15 (rs6478108; P = 1.50 x 10(-8), OR = 1.10), and association of common protein-altering variants at 11 loci previously implicated in psoriasis susceptibility. We validate previous reports of protective low-frequency protein-altering variants within IFIH1 (encoding an innate antiviral receptor) and TYK2 (encoding a Janus kinase), in each case establishing a further series of protective rare variants (minor allele frequency amp;lt; 0.01) via gene-wide aggregation testing (IFIH1: p(burden) = 2.53 x 10(-7), OR = 0.707; TYK2: p(burden) = 6.17 x 10(-4), OR = 0.744). Both genes play significant roles in type I interferon (IFN) production and signalling. Several of the protective rare and low-frequency variants in IFIH1 and TYK2 disrupt conserved protein domains, highlighting potential mechanisms through which their effect may be exerted.
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