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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Kapusta Aurelie) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Kapusta Aurelie)

  • Resultat 1-3 av 3
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1.
  • Holt, Carson, et al. (författare)
  • Improved Genome Assembly and Annotation for the Rock Pigeon (Columba livia)
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: G3. - : GENETICS SOCIETY AMERICA. - 2160-1836 .- 2160-1836. ; 8:5, s. 1391-1398
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The domestic rock pigeon (Columba livia) is among the most widely distributed and phenotypically diverse avian species. C. livia is broadly studied in ecology, genetics, physiology, behavior, and evolutionary biology, and has recently emerged as a model for understanding the molecular basis of anatomical diversity, the magnetic sense, and other key aspects of avian biology. Here we report an update to the C. livia genome reference assembly and gene annotation dataset. Greatly increased scaffold lengths in the updated reference assembly, along with an updated annotation set, provide improved tools for evolutionary and functional genetic studies of the pigeon, and for comparative avian genomics in general.
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2.
  • Kapusta, Aurelie, et al. (författare)
  • Dynamics of genome size evolution in birds and mammals
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. - 0027-8424 .- 1091-6490. ; 114:8, s. E1460-E1469
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Genome size in mammals and birds shows remarkably little interspecific variation compared with other taxa. However, genome sequencing has revealed that many mammal and bird lineages have experienced differential rates of transposable element (TE) accumulation, which would be predicted to cause substantial variation in genome size between species. Thus, we hypothesize that there has been covariation between the amount of DNA gained by transposition and lost by deletion during mammal and avian evolution, resulting in genome size equilibrium. To test this model, we develop computational methods to quantify the amount of DNA gained by TE expansion and lost by deletion over the last 100 My in the lineages of 10 species of eutherian mammals and 24 species of birds. The results reveal extensive variation in the amount of DNA gained via lineage-specific transposition, but that DNA loss counteracted this expansion to various extents across lineages. Our analysis of the rate and size spectrum of deletion events implies that DNA removal in both mammals and birds has proceeded mostly through large segmental deletions (> 10 kb). These findings support a unified "accordion" model of genome size evolution in eukaryotes whereby DNA loss counteracting TE expansion is a major determinant of genome size. Furthermore, we propose that extensive DNA loss, and not necessarily a dearth of TE activity, has been the primary force maintaining the greater genomic compaction of flying birds and bats relative to their flightless relatives.
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3.
  • Kapusta, Aurelie, et al. (författare)
  • Evolution of bird genomes-a transposon's-eye view
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. - : WILEY. - 0077-8923 .- 1749-6632. ; 1389:1, s. 164-185
  • Forskningsöversikt (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Birds, the most species-rich monophyletic group of land vertebrates, have been subject to some of the most intense sequencing efforts to date, making them an ideal case study for recent developments in genomics research. Here, we review how our understanding of bird genomes has changed with the recent sequencing of more than 75 species from all major avian taxa. We illuminate avian genome evolution from a previously neglected perspective: their repetitive genomic parasites, transposable elements (TEs) and endogenous viral elements (EVEs). We show that (1) birds are unique among vertebrates in terms of their genome organization; (2) information about the diversity of avian TEs and EVEs is changing rapidly; (3) flying birds have smaller genomes yet more TEs than flightless birds; (4) current second-generation genome assemblies fail to capture the variation in avian chromosome number and genome size determined with cytogenetics; (5) the genomic microcosm of bird-TE "arms races" has yet to be explored; and (6) upcoming third-generation genome assemblies suggest that birds exhibit stability in gene-rich regions and instability in TE-rich regions. We emphasize that integration of cytogenetics and single-molecule technologies with repeat-resolved genome assemblies is essential for understanding the evolution of (bird) genomes.
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  • Resultat 1-3 av 3

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