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Sökning: WFRF:(Klein Teri E.)

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1.
  • Daneshjou, Roxana, et al. (författare)
  • Working toward precision medicine : Predicting phenotypes from exomes in the Critical Assessment of Genome Interpretation (CAGI) challenges
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Human Mutation. - : John Wiley and Sons. - 1059-7794. ; 38:9, s. 1182-1192
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Precision medicine aims to predict a patient's disease risk and best therapeutic options by using that individual's genetic sequencing data. The Critical Assessment of Genome Interpretation (CAGI) is a community experiment consisting of genotype-phenotype prediction challenges; participants build models, undergo assessment, and share key findings. For CAGI 4, three challenges involved using exome-sequencing data: Crohn's disease, bipolar disorder, and warfarin dosing. Previous CAGI challenges included prior versions of the Crohn's disease challenge. Here, we discuss the range of techniques used for phenotype prediction as well as the methods used for assessing predictive models. Additionally, we outline some of the difficulties associated with making predictions and evaluating them. The lessons learned from the exome challenges can be applied to both research and clinical efforts to improve phenotype prediction from genotype. In addition, these challenges serve as a vehicle for sharing clinical and research exome data in a secure manner with scientists who have a broad range of expertise, contributing to a collaborative effort to advance our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships.
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2.
  • Lindqvist Appell, Malin, et al. (författare)
  • Nomenclature for alleles of the thiopurine methyltransferase gene
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Pharmacogenetics & Genomics. - : Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. - 1744-6872 .- 1744-6880. ; 23:4, s. 242-248
  • Forskningsöversikt (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The drug-metabolizing enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) has become one of the best examples of pharmacogenomics to be translated into routine clinical practice. TPMT metabolizes the thiopurines 6-mercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine, and azathioprine, drugs that are widely used for treatment of acute leukemias, inflammatory bowel diseases, and other disorders of immune regulation. Since the discovery of genetic polymorphisms in the TPMT gene, many sequence variants that cause a decreased enzyme activity have been identified and characterized. Increasingly, to optimize dose, pretreatment determination of TPMT status before commencing thiopurine therapy is now routine in many countries. Novel TPMT sequence variants are currently numbered sequentially using PubMed as a source of information; however, this has caused some problems as exemplified by two instances in which authors articles appeared on PubMed at the same time, resulting in the same allele numbers given to different polymorphisms. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish an order and consensus to the numbering of known and novel TPMT sequence variants. To address this problem, a TPMT nomenclature committee was formed in 2010, to define the nomenclature and numbering of novel variants for the TPMT gene. A website (http://www.imh.liu.se/tpmtalleles) serves as a platform for this work. Researchers are encouraged to submit novel TPMT alleles to the committee for designation and reservation of unique allele numbers. The committee has decided to renumber two alleles: nucleotide position 106 (Gandgt;A) from TPMT*24 to TPMT*30 and position 611 (Tandgt;C, rs79901429) from TPMT*28 to TPMT*31. Nomenclature for all other known alleles remains unchanged. Pharmacogenetics and Genomics 23: 242-248
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3.
  • Caudle, Kelly E, et al. (författare)
  • Incorporation of Pharmacogenomics into Routine Clinical Practice : the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline Development Process
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Current drug metabolism. - 1389-2002 .- 1875-5453. ; 15:2, s. 209-217
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines.
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4.
  • Limdi, Nita A., et al. (författare)
  • Warfarin pharmacogenetics : a single VKORC1 polymorphism is predictive of dose across three racial groups
  • 2010
  • Ingår i: Blood. - 0006-4971 .- 1528-0020. ; 115:18, s. 3827-3834
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Warfarin dosing algorithms incorporating CYP2C9 and VKORC1-1639G>A improve dose prediction compared to algorithms based solely on clinical and demographic factors. However these algorithms better capture dose variability among Whites compared to Asians or Blacks. Herein we evaluate whether other VKORC1 polymorphisms and haplotypes explain additional variation in warfarin dose beyond that explained by VKORC1-1639G>A among Asians (n=1103), Blacks (n=670) and Whites (n=3113). Participants were recruited from 11 countries as part of the International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium effort. Evaluation of the effects of individual VKORC1 SNPs and haplotypes on warfarin dose employed both univariate and multivariable linear regression. VKORC1-1639G>A and 1173C>T individually explained the greatest variance in dose in all three racial groups. Incorporation of additional VKORC1 SNPs or haplotypes did not further improve dose prediction. VKORC1 explained greater variability in dose among Whites as compared to Blacks and Asians. Differences in the percent variance in dose explained by VKORC1 across race was largely accounted for by the frequency of the -1639 A (or 1173 T) allele. Thus, clinicians should recognize that although at a population level, the contribution of VKORC1 towards dose requirements is higher in Whites compared to non-whites; genotype predicts similar dose requirements across racial groups.
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5.
  • Parra, Esteban J., et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide association study of warfarin maintenance dose in a Brazilian sample
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: Pharmacogenomics (London). - 1462-2416 .- 1744-8042. ; 16:11, s. 1253-1263
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Aim: Extreme discordant phenotype and genome-wide association (GWA) approaches were combined to explore the role of genetic variants on warfarin dose requirement in Brazilians. Methods: Patients receiving low (<= 20 mg/week; n = 180) or high stable warfarin doses (>= 42.5 mg/week; n = 187) were genotyped with Affymetrix Axiom (R) Biobank arrays. Imputation was carried out using data from the combined 1000 Genomes project. Results: Genome-wide signals (p <= 5 x 10(-8)) were identified in the well-known VKORC1 (lead SNP, rs749671; OR: 20.4; p = 1.08 x 10(-33)) and CYP2C9 (lead SNP, rs9332238, OR: 6.8 and p = 4.4 x 10(-13)) regions. The rs9332238 polymorphism is in virtually perfect LD with CYP2C9*2 (rs1799853) and CYP2C9*3 (rs1057910). No other genome-wide significant regions were identified in the study. Conclusion: We confirmed the important role of VKORC1 and CYP2C9 polymorphisms in warfarin dose.
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6.
  • Perera, Minoli A., et al. (författare)
  • Genetic variants associated with warfarin dose in African-American individuals : a genome-wide association study
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - 0140-6736 .- 1474-547X. ; 382:9894, s. 790-796
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background VKORC1 and CYP2C9 are important contributors to warfarin dose variability, but explain less variability for individuals of African descent than for those of European or Asian descent. We aimed to identify additional variants contributing to warfarin dose requirements in African Americans. Methods We did a genome-wide association study of discovery and replication cohorts. Samples from African-American adults (aged >= 18 years) who were taking a stable maintenance dose of warfarin were obtained at International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) sites and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (Birmingham, AL, USA). Patients enrolled at IWPC sites but who were not used for discovery made up the independent replication cohort. All participants were genotyped. We did a stepwise conditional analysis, conditioning first for VKORC1 -1639G -> A, followed by the composite genotype of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. We prespecified a genome-wide significance threshold of p<5x10(-8) in the discovery cohort and p<0.0038 in the replication cohort. Findings The discovery cohort contained 533 participants and the replication cohort 432 participants. After the prespecified conditioning in the discovery cohort, we identified an association between a novel single nucleotide polymorphism in the CYP2C cluster on chromosome 10 (rs12777823) and warfarin dose requirement that reached genome-wide significance (p=1.51x10(-8)). This association was confirmed in the replication cohort (p=5.04x10(-5)); analysis of the two cohorts together produced a p value of 4.5x10(-12). Individuals heterozygous for the rs12777823 A allele need a dose reduction of 6.92 mg/week and those homozygous 9.34 mg/week. Regression analysis showed that the inclusion of rs12777823 significantly improves warfarin dose variability explained by the IWPC dosing algorithm (21% relative improvement). Interpretation A novel CYP2C single nucleotide polymorphism exerts a clinically relevant effect on warfarin dose in African Americans, independent of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. Incorporation of this variant into pharmacogenetic dosing algorithms could improve warfarin dose prediction in this population.
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