SwePub
Sök i SwePub databas

  Utökad sökning

Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Mahajan Anubha) "

Sökning: WFRF:(Mahajan Anubha)

  • Resultat 1-10 av 90
  • [1]234567...9Nästa
Sortera/gruppera träfflistan
   
NumreringReferensOmslagsbildHitta
1.
  • Atabaki-Pasdar, Naeimeh, et al. (författare)
  • Inferring causal pathways between metabolic processes and liver fat accumulation: an IMI DIRECT study
  • 2021
  • Annan publikation (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) often co-occur. Defining causal pathways underlying this relationship may help optimize the prevention and treatment of both diseases. Thus, we assessed the strength and magnitude of the putative causal pathways linking dysglycemia and fatty liver, using a combination of causal inference methods.Measures of glycemia, insulin dynamics, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived abdominal and liver fat content, serological biomarkers, lifestyle, and anthropometry were obtained in participants from the IMI DIRECT cohorts (n=795 with new onset T2D and 2234 individuals free from diabetes). UK Biobank (n=3641) was used for modelling and replication purposes. Bayesian networks were employed to infer causal pathways, with causal validation using two-sample Mendelian randomization.Bayesian networks fitted to IMI DIRECT data identified higher basal insulin secretion rate (BasalISR) and MRI-derived excess visceral fat (VAT) accumulation as the features of dysmetabolism most likely to cause liver fat accumulation; the unconditional probability of fatty liver (>5%) increased significantly when conditioning on high levels of BasalISR and VAT (by 23%, 32% respectively; 40% for both). Analyses in UK Biobank yielded comparable results. MR confirmed most causal pathways predicted by the Bayesian networks.Here, BasalISR had the highest causal effect on fatty liver predisposition, providing mechanistic evidence underpinning the established association of NAFLD and T2D. BasalISR may represent a pragmatic biomarker for NAFLD prediction in clinical practice.Competing Interest StatementHR is an employee and shareholder of Sanofi. MIM: The views expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health. MIM has served on advisory panels for Pfizer, NovoNordisk and Zoe Global, has received honoraria from Merck, Pfizer, Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly, and research funding from Abbvie, Astra Zeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly, Janssen, Merck, NovoNordisk, Pfizer, Roche, Sanofi Aventis, Servier, and Takeda. As of June 2019, MIM is an employee of Genentech, and a holder of Roche stock. AM is a consultant for Lilly and has received research grants from several diabetes drug companies. PWF has received research grants from numerous diabetes drug companies and fess as consultant from Novo Nordisk, Lilly, and Zoe Global Ltd. He is currently the Scientific Director in Patient Care at the Novo Nordisk Foundation. Other authors declare non competing interests.Funding StatementThe work leading to this publication has received support from the Innovative Medicines Initiative Joint Undertaking under grant agreement 115317 (DIRECT) resources of which are composed of financial contribution from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) and EFPIA companies in kind contribution. NAP is supported in part by Henning och Johan Throne-Holsts Foundation, Hans Werthen Foundation, an IRC award from the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research and a European Research Council award ERC-2015-CoG - 681742_NASCENT. HPM is supported by an IRC award from the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research and a European Research Council award ERC-2015-CoG - 681742_NASCENT. AGJ is supported by an NIHR Clinician Scientist award (17/0005624). RK is funded by the Novo Nordisk Foundation (NNF18OC0031650) as part of a postdoctoral fellowship, an IRC award from the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research and a European Research Council award ERC-2015-CoG - 681742_NASCENT. AK, PM, HF, JF and GNG are supported by an IRC award from the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research and a European Research Council award ERC-2015-CoG - 681742_NASCENT. TJM is funded by an NIHR clinical senior lecturer fellowship. S.Bru acknowledges support from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (grants NNF17OC0027594 and NNF14CC0001). ATH is a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator and is also supported by the NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility. JMS acknowledges support from Science for Life Laboratory (Plasma Profiling Facility), Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (Human Protein Atlas) and Erling-Persson Foundation (KTH Centre for Precision Medicine). MIM is supported by the following grants; Wellcome (090532, 098381, 106130, 203141, 212259); NIH (U01-DK105535). PWF is supported by an IRC award from the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research and a European Research Council award ERC-2015-CoG - 681742_NASCENT. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.Author DeclarationsI confirm all relevant ethical guidelines have been followed, and any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained.YesThe details of the IRB/oversight body that provided approval or exemption for the research described are given below:Approval for the study protocol was obtained from each of the regional research ethics review boards separately (Lund, Sweden: 20130312105459927, Copenhagen, Denmark: H-1-2012-166 and H-1-2012-100, Amsterdam, Netherlands: NL40099.029.12, Newcastle, Dundee and Exeter, UK: 12/NE/0132), and all participants provided written informed consent at enrolment. The research conformed to the ethical principles for medical research involving human participants outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki.All necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived.YesI understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance).YesI have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines and uploaded the relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material as supplementary files, if applicable.YesAuthors agree to make data and materials supporting the results or analyses presented in their paper available upon reasonable request
  •  
2.
  • Bentley, Amy R., et al. (författare)
  • Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of 387,272 individuals identifies new loci associated with serum lipids
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 51:4, s. 636-
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The concentrations of high- and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are influenced by smoking, but it is unknown whether genetic associations with lipids may be modified by smoking. We conducted a multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study in 133,805 individuals with follow-up in an additional 253,467 individuals. Combined meta-analyses identified 13 new loci associated with lipids, some of which were detected only because association differed by smoking status. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of including diverse populations, particularly in studies of interactions with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences by ancestry may contribute to novel findings.
  •  
3.
  • Bizzotto, Roberto, et al. (författare)
  • Processes Underlying Glycemic Deterioration in Type 2 Diabetes : An IMI DIRECT Study
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Diabetes Care. - : American Diabetes Association. - 1935-5548 .- 0149-5992. ; 44:2, s. 511-518
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: We investigated the processes underlying glycemic deterioration in type 2 diabetes (T2D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 732 recently diagnosed patients with T2D from the Innovative Medicines Initiative Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification (IMI DIRECT) study were extensively phenotyped over 3 years, including measures of insulin sensitivity (OGIS), β-cell glucose sensitivity (GS), and insulin clearance (CLIm) from mixed meal tests, liver enzymes, lipid profiles, and baseline regional fat from MRI. The associations between the longitudinal metabolic patterns and HbA1c deterioration, adjusted for changes in BMI and in diabetes medications, were assessed via stepwise multivariable linear and logistic regression. RESULTS: Faster HbA1c progression was independently associated with faster deterioration of OGIS and GS and increasing CLIm; visceral or liver fat, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides had further independent, though weaker, roles (R2 = 0.38). A subgroup of patients with a markedly higher progression rate (fast progressors) was clearly distinguishable considering these variables only (discrimination capacity from area under the receiver operating characteristic = 0.94). The proportion of fast progressors was reduced from 56% to 8-10% in subgroups in which only one trait among OGIS, GS, and CLIm was relatively stable (odds ratios 0.07-0.09). T2D polygenic risk score and baseline pancreatic fat, glucagon-like peptide 1, glucagon, diet, and physical activity did not show an independent role. CONCLUSIONS: Deteriorating insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, increasing insulin clearance, high visceral or liver fat, and worsening of the lipid profile are the crucial factors mediating glycemic deterioration of patients with T2D in the initial phase of the disease. Stabilization of a single trait among insulin sensitivity, β-cell function, and insulin clearance may be relevant to prevent progression.
  •  
4.
  • Bolton, Jennifer L, et al. (författare)
  • Genome Wide Association Identifies Common Variants at the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 Locus Influencing Plasma Cortisol and Corticosteroid Binding Globulin.
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: PLoS genetics. - 1553-7404 .- 1553-7390. ; 10:7
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Variation in plasma levels of cortisol, an essential hormone in the stress response, is associated in population-based studies with cardio-metabolic, inflammatory and neuro-cognitive traits and diseases. Heritability of plasma cortisol is estimated at 30-60% but no common genetic contribution has been identified. The CORtisol NETwork (CORNET) consortium undertook genome wide association meta-analysis for plasma cortisol in 12,597 Caucasian participants, replicated in 2,795 participants. The results indicate that <1% of variance in plasma cortisol is accounted for by genetic variation in a single region of chromosome 14. This locus spans SERPINA6, encoding corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, the major cortisol-binding protein in plasma), and SERPINA1, encoding α1-antitrypsin (which inhibits cleavage of the reactive centre loop that releases cortisol from CBG). Three partially independent signals were identified within the region, represented by common SNPs; detailed biochemical investigation in a nested sub-cohort showed all these SNPs were associated with variation in total cortisol binding activity in plasma, but some variants influenced total CBG concentrations while the top hit (rs12589136) influenced the immunoreactivity of the reactive centre loop of CBG. Exome chip and 1000 Genomes imputation analysis of this locus in the CROATIA-Korcula cohort identified missense mutations in SERPINA6 and SERPINA1 that did not account for the effects of common variants. These findings reveal a novel common genetic source of variation in binding of cortisol by CBG, and reinforce the key role of CBG in determining plasma cortisol levels. In turn this genetic variation may contribute to cortisol-associated degenerative diseases.
  •  
5.
  • Chen, Ji, et al. (författare)
  • The trans-ancestral genomic architecture of glycemic traits
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - : Nature Publishing Group. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 53:6, s. 840-860
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Glycemic traits are used to diagnose and monitor type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic health. To date, most genetic studies of glycemic traits have focused on individuals of European ancestry. Here we aggregated genome-wide association studies comprising up to 281,416 individuals without diabetes (30% non-European ancestry) for whom fasting glucose, 2-h glucose after an oral glucose challenge, glycated hemoglobin and fasting insulin data were available. Trans-ancestry and single-ancestry meta-analyses identified 242 loci (99 novel; P < 5 × 10-8), 80% of which had no significant evidence of between-ancestry heterogeneity. Analyses restricted to individuals of European ancestry with equivalent sample size would have led to 24 fewer new loci. Compared with single-ancestry analyses, equivalent-sized trans-ancestry fine-mapping reduced the number of estimated variants in 99% credible sets by a median of 37.5%. Genomic-feature, gene-expression and gene-set analyses revealed distinct biological signatures for each trait, highlighting different underlying biological pathways. Our results increase our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology by using trans-ancestry studies for improved power and resolution.
  •  
6.
  • Chu, Audrey Y, et al. (författare)
  • Multiethnic genome-wide meta-analysis of ectopic fat depots identifies loci associated with adipocyte development and differentiation
  • 2017
  • Ingår i: Nature Genetics. - 1061-4036 .- 1546-1718. ; 49:1, s. 125-130
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Variation in body fat distribution contributes to the metabolic sequelae of obesity. The genetic determinants of body fat distribution are poorly understood. The goal of this study was to gain new insights into the underlying genetics of body fat distribution by conducting sample-size-weighted fixed-effects genome-wide association meta-analyses in up to 9,594 women and 8,738 men of European, African, Hispanic and Chinese ancestry, with and without sex stratification, for six traits associated with ectopic fat (hereinafter referred to as ectopic-fat traits). In total, we identified seven new loci associated with ectopic-fat traits (ATXN1, UBE2E2, EBF1, RREB1, GSDMB, GRAMD3 and ENSA; P < 5 × 10(-8); false discovery rate < 1%). Functional analysis of these genes showed that loss of function of either Atxn1 or Ube2e2 in primary mouse adipose progenitor cells impaired adipocyte differentiation, suggesting physiological roles for ATXN1 and UBE2E2 in adipogenesis. Future studies are necessary to further explore the mechanisms by which these genes affect adipocyte biology and how their perturbations contribute to systemic metabolic disease.
  •  
7.
  • Dawed, Adem Y., et al. (författare)
  • Variation in the plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) (encoded by SLC29A4) and organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) (encoded by SLC22A1) and gastrointestinal intolerance to metformin in type 2 diabetes : An IMI direct study
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Diabetes Care. - : American Diabetes Association. - 0149-5992 .- 1935-5548. ; 42:6, s. 1027-1033
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE Gastrointestinal adverse effects occur in 20–30% of patients with metformin-treated type 2 diabetes, leading to premature discontinuation in 5–10% of the cases. Gastrointestinal intolerance may reflect localized high concentrations of metformin in the gut. We hypothesized that reduced transport of metformin via the plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) and organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) could increase the risk of severe gastrointestinal adverse effects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study included 286 severe metformin-intolerant and 1,128 metformin-tolerant individuals from the IMI DIRECT (Innovative Medicines Initiative: DIabetes REsearCh on patient straTification) consortium. We assessed the association of patient characteristics, concomitant medication, and the burden of mutations in the SLC29A4 and SLC22A1 genes on odds of intolerance. RESULTS Women (P < 0.001) and older people (P < 0.001) were more likely to develop metformin intolerance. Concomitant use of transporter-inhibiting drugs increased the odds of intolerance (odds ratio [OR] 1.72, P < 0.001). In an adjusted logistic regression model, the G allele at rs3889348 (SLC29A4) was associated with gastrointestinal intolerance (OR 1.34, P = 0.005). rs3889348 is the top cis-expression quantitative trait locus for SLC29A4 in gut tissue where carriers of the G allele had reduced expression. Homozygous carriers of the G allele treated with transporter-inhibiting drugs had more than three times higher odds of intolerance compared with carriers of no G allele and not treated with inhibiting drugs (OR 3.23, P < 0.001). Use of a genetic risk score derived from rs3889348 and SLC22A1 variants found that the odds of intolerance were more than twice as high in individuals who carry three or more risk alleles compared with those carrying none (OR 2.15, P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that intestinal metformin transporters and concomitant medications play an important role in the gastrointestinal adverse effects of metformin.
  •  
8.
  • Deshmukh, Harshal A., et al. (författare)
  • Genome-Wide Association Analysis of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Glucose Sensitivity
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism. - : Oxford University Press. - 1945-7197 .- 0021-972X. ; 106:1, s. 80-90
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • CONTEXT: Pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity is the slope of the plasma glucose-insulin secretion relationship and is a key predictor of deteriorating glucose tolerance and development of type 2 diabetes. However, there are no large-scale studies looking at the genetic determinants of beta-cell glucose sensitivity. OBJECTIVE: To understand the genetic determinants of pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity using genome-wide meta-analysis and candidate gene studies. DESIGN: We performed a genome-wide meta-analysis for beta-cell glucose sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes and nondiabetic subjects from 6 independent cohorts (n = 5706). Beta-cell glucose sensitivity was calculated from mixed meal and oral glucose tolerance tests, and its associations between known glycemia-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide association study (GWAS) SNPs were estimated using linear regression models. RESULTS: Beta-cell glucose sensitivity was moderately heritable (h2 ranged from 34% to 55%) using SNP and family-based analyses. GWAS meta-analysis identified multiple correlated SNPs in the CDKAL1 gene and GIPR-QPCTL gene loci that reached genome-wide significance, with SNP rs2238691 in GIPR-QPCTL (P value = 2.64 × 10-9) and rs9368219 in the CDKAL1 (P value = 3.15 × 10-9) showing the strongest association with beta-cell glucose sensitivity. These loci surpassed genome-wide significance when the GWAS meta-analysis was repeated after exclusion of the diabetic subjects. After correction for multiple testing, glycemia-associated SNPs in or near the HHEX and IGF2B2 loci were also associated with beta-cell glucose sensitivity. CONCLUSION: We show that, variation at the GIPR-QPCTL and CDKAL1 loci are key determinants of pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity.
  •  
9.
  • Ek, Weronica E, et al. (författare)
  • Genome-wide DNA methylation study identifies genes associated with the cardiovascular biomarker GDF-15
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: Human Molecular Genetics. - 0964-6906 .- 1460-2083. ; 25:4, s. 817-827
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Growth-differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is expressed in low to moderate levels in most healthy tissues and increases in response to inflammation. GDF-15 is associated with cardiovascular dysfunction and over-expressed in the myocardium of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). However, little is known about the function of GDF-15 in cardiovascular disease, and the underlying regulatory network of GDF-15 is not known. To investigate a possible association between GDF-15 levels and DNA methylation, we performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study of white blood cells in a population-based study (N = 717). Significant loci where replicated in an independent cohort (N = 963). We also performed a gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. We identified and replicated 16 CpG-sites (false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.05), at 11 independent loci including MIR21. MIR21 encodes a microRNA (miR-21) that has previously been shown to be associated with the development of heart disease. Interestingly, GDF15 mRNA contains a binding site for miR-21. Four sites were also differentially methylated in blood from participants previously diagnosed with MI and 14 enriched GO terms (FDR < 0.05, enrichment > 2) were identified, including 'cardiac muscle cell differentiation'. This study shows that GDF-15 levels are associated with differences in DNA methylation in blood cells, and a subset of the loci are also differentially methylated in participants with MI. However, there might be interactions between GDF-15 levels and methylation in other tissues not addressed in this study. These results provide novel links between GDF-15 and cardiovascular disease.
  •  
10.
  • Eriksen, Rebeca, et al. (författare)
  • Dietary metabolite profiling brings new insight into the relationship between nutrition and metabolic risk : An IMI DIRECT study
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: EBioMedicine. - : Elsevier. - 2352-3964. ; 58
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Dietary advice remains the cornerstone of prevention and management of type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, understanding the efficacy of dietary interventions is confounded by the challenges inherent in assessing free living diet. Here we profiled dietary metabolites to investigate glycaemic deterioration and cardiometabolic risk in people at risk of or living with T2D. Methods: We analysed data from plasma collected at baseline and 18-month follow-up in individuals from the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) Diabetes Research on Patient Stratification (DIRECT) cohort 1 n = 403 individuals with normal or impaired glucose regulation (prediabetic) and cohort 2 n = 458 individuals with new onset of T2D. A dietary metabolite profile model (Tpred) was constructed using multivariable regression of 113 plasma metabolites obtained from targeted metabolomics assays. The continuous Tpred score was used to explore the relationships between diet, glycaemic deterioration and cardio-metabolic risk via multiple linear regression models. Findings: A higher Tpred score was associated with healthier diets high in wholegrain (β=3.36 g, 95% CI 0.31, 6.40 and β=2.82 g, 95% CI 0.06, 5.57) and lower energy intake (β=-75.53 kcal, 95% CI -144.71, -2.35 and β=-122.51 kcal, 95% CI -186.56, -38.46), and saturated fat (β=-0.92 g, 95% CI -1.56, -0.28 and β=–0.98 g, 95% CI -1.53, -0.42 g), respectively for cohort 1 and 2. In both cohorts a higher Tpred score was also associated with lower total body adiposity and favourable lipid profiles HDL-cholesterol (β=0.07 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.03, 0.1), (β=0.08 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.04, 0.1), and triglycerides (β=-0.1 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.2, -0.03), (β=-0.2 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.3, -0.09), respectively for cohort 1 and 2. In cohort 2, the Tpred score was negatively associated with liver fat (β=-0.74%, 95% CI -0.67, -0.81), and lower fasting concentrations of HbA1c (β=-0.9 mmol/mol, 95% CI -1.5, -0.1), glucose (β=-0.2 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.4, -0.05) and insulin (β=-11.0 pmol/mol, 95% CI -19.5, -2.6). Longitudinal analysis showed at 18-month follow up a higher Tpred score was also associated lower total body adiposity in both cohorts and lower fasting glucose (β=-0.2 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.3, -0.01) and insulin (β=-9.2 pmol/mol, 95% CI -17.9, -0.4) concentrations in cohort 2. Interpretation: Plasma dietary metabolite profiling provides objective measures of diet intake, showing a relationship to glycaemic deterioration and cardiometabolic health. Funding: This work was supported by the Innovative Medicines Initiative Joint Undertaking under grant agreement no. 115,317 (DIRECT), resources of which are composed of financial contribution from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007–2013) and EFPIA companies.
  •  
Skapa referenser, mejla, bekava och länka
  • Resultat 1-10 av 90
  • [1]234567...9Nästa
Typ av publikation
tidskriftsartikel (89)
annan publikation (1)
Typ av innehåll
refereegranskat (89)
övrigt vetenskapligt (1)
Författare/redaktör
Mahajan, Anubha (90)
Lind, Lars (60)
McCarthy, Mark I (57)
Lindgren, Cecilia M. (48)
Laakso, Markku (43)
Loos, Ruth J F (43)
visa fler...
Salomaa, Veikko (41)
Boehnke, Michael (41)
Wareham, Nicholas J. (40)
Langenberg, Claudia (40)
Mohlke, Karen L (40)
Hansen, Torben (39)
Ingelsson, Erik (39)
Pedersen, Oluf (37)
Peters, Annette (36)
Hayward, Caroline (36)
Luan, Jian'an (36)
Esko, Tonu (35)
Uitterlinden, Andre ... (34)
Scott, Robert A (34)
Raitakari, Olli T (33)
Gieger, Christian (33)
Metspalu, Andres (33)
Grarup, Niels (32)
Tuomilehto, Jaakko (32)
Rudan, Igor (31)
Stefansson, Kari (31)
Palmer, Colin N. A. (31)
Zeggini, Eleftheria (31)
Groop, Leif (30)
Van Duijn, Cornelia ... (30)
Franks, Paul W. (30)
Kuusisto, Johanna (30)
Chasman, Daniel I. (30)
Frayling, Timothy M (30)
Zhang, Weihua (30)
Rotter, Jerome I. (29)
Ridker, Paul M. (29)
Thorsteinsdottir, Un ... (29)
Strauch, Konstantin (29)
Gudnason, Vilmundur (28)
Linneberg, Allan (28)
Wilson, James F. (28)
Harris, Tamara B (28)
Polasek, Ozren (28)
Jackson, Anne U. (28)
Perola, Markus (27)
Froguel, Philippe (27)
Boerwinkle, Eric (27)
Walker, Mark (27)
visa färre...
Lärosäte
Uppsala universitet (53)
Lunds universitet (43)
Umeå universitet (26)
Göteborgs universitet (8)
Karolinska Institutet (8)
Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (6)
visa fler...
Stockholms universitet (4)
Örebro universitet (4)
Högskolan Dalarna (3)
Mittuniversitetet (2)
Luleå tekniska universitet (1)
visa färre...
Språk
Engelska (90)
Forskningsämne (UKÄ/SCB)
Medicin och hälsovetenskap (88)
Naturvetenskap (12)
Samhällsvetenskap (1)

År

Kungliga biblioteket hanterar dina personuppgifter i enlighet med EU:s dataskyddsförordning (2018), GDPR. Läs mer om hur det funkar här.
Så här hanterar KB dina uppgifter vid användning av denna tjänst.

 
pil uppåt Stäng

Kopiera och spara länken för att återkomma till aktuell vy