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1.
  • Torén, Kjell, 1952, et al. (författare)
  • Chronic airflow limitation and its relation to respiratory symptoms among ever-smokers and never-smokers: a cross-sectional study
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Bmj Open Respiratory Research. - : BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP. - 2052-4439. ; 7:1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is based on the presence of persistent respiratory symptoms and chronic airflow limitation (CAL). CAL is based on the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity (FEV1:FVC) after bronchodilation, and FEV1:FVC less than the fifth percentile is often used as a cut-off for CAL. The aim was to investigate if increasing percentiles of FEV1:FVC were associated withany respiratory symptom(cough with phlegm, dyspnoea or wheezing) in a general population sample of never-smokers and ever-smokers. Methods In a cross-sectional study comprising 15 128 adults (50-64 years), 7120 never-smokers and 8008 ever-smokers completed a respiratory questionnaire and performed FEV(1)and FVC after bronchodilation. We calculated theirz-scores for FEV1:FVC and defined the fifth percentile using the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) reference value, GLI(5)and increasing percentiles up to GLI(25). We analysed the associations between different strata of percentiles and prevalence ofany respiratory symptomusing multivariable logistic regression for estimation of OR. Results Among all subjects, regardless of smoking habits, the odds ofany respiratory symptomwere elevated up to the GLI(15-20)strata. Among never-smokers, the odds ofany respiratory symptomwere elevated at GLI(<5)(OR 3.57, 95% CI 2.43 to 5.23) and at GLI(5-10)(OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.69 to 3.91), but not at higher percentiles. Among ever-smokers, the odds ofany respiratory symptomwere elevated from GLI(<5)(OR 4.64, 95% CI 3.79 to 5.68) up to GLI(>= 25)(OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.75). Conclusions The association between percentages of FEV1:FVC and respiratory symptoms differed depending on smoking history. Our results support a higher percentile cut-off for FEV1:FVC for never-smokers and, in particular, for ever-smokers.
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2.
  • Torén, Kjell, 1952, et al. (författare)
  • The ratio FEV1/FVC and its association to respiratory symptoms-A Swedish general population study
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging. - : John Wiley & Sons. - 1475-0961 .- 1475-097X. ; 41:2, s. 181-191
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Chronic airflow limitation (CAL) can be defined as fixed ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) any respiratory symptom. In a cross-sectional general population study, 15,128 adults (50-64 years of age), 7,120 never-smokers and 8,008 ever-smokers completed a respiratory questionnaire and performed FEV1 and FVC after bronchodilation. We calculated different ratios of FEV1/FVC from 0.40 to 1.0 using 0.70 as reference category. We analysed odds ratios (OR) between different ratios and any respiratory symptom using adjusted multivariable logistic regression. Among all subjects, regardless of smoking habits, the lowest odds for any respiratory symptom was at FEV1/FVC = 0.82, OR 0.48 (95% CI 0.41-0.56). Among never-smokers, the lowest odds for any respiratory symptom was at FEV1/FVC = 0.81, OR 0.53 (95% CI 0.41-0.70). Among ever-smokers, the odds for any respiratory symptom was lowest at FEV1/FVC = 0.81, OR 0.43 (95% CI 0.16-1.19), although the rate of inclining in odds was small in the upper part, that is FEV1/FVC = 0.85 showed similar odds, OR 0.45 (95% CI 0.38-0.55). We concluded that the odds for any respiratory symptoms continuously decreased with higher FEV1/FVC ratios and reached a minimum around 0.80-0.85, with similar results among never-smokers. These results indicate that the optimal threshold associated with respiratory symptoms may be higher than 0.70 and this should be further investigated in prospective longitudinal studies.
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3.
  • Nerpin, E., et al. (författare)
  • Determinants of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in healthy men and women from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Clinical and Experimental Allergy. - : John Wiley & Sons. - 0954-7894 .- 1365-2222. ; 49:7, s. 969-979
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Introduction The fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is a marker for type 2 inflammation used in diagnostics and management of asthma. In order to use FENO as a reliable biomarker, it is important to investigate factors that influence FENO in healthy individuals. Men have higher levels of FENO than women, but it is unclear whether determinants of FENO differ by sex. Objective To identify determinants of FENO in men and women without lung diseases. Method Fractional exhaled nitric oxide was validly measured in 3881 healthy subjects that had answered the main questionnaire of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III without airways or lung disease. Results Exhaled NO levels were 21.3% higher in men compared with women P < 0.001. Being in the upper age quartile (60.3-67.6 years), men had 19.2 ppb (95% CI: 18.3, 20.2) higher FENO than subjects in the lowest age quartile (39.7-48.3 years) P = 0.02. Women in the two highest age quartiles (54.6-60.2 and 60.3-67.6 years) had 15.4 ppb (14.7, 16.2), P = 0.03 and 16.4 ppb (15.6, 17.1), P = FENO, compared with the lowest age quartile. Height was related to 8% higher FENO level in men (P < 0.001) and 5% higher FENO levels in women (P = 0.008). Men who smoked had 37% lower FENO levels and women had 30% lower levels compared with never-smokers (P < 0.001 for both). Men and women sensitized to both grass and perennial allergens had higher FENO levels compared with non-sensitized subjects 26% and 29%, P Fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels were higher in men than women. Similar effects of current smoking, height, and IgE sensitization were found in both sexes. FENO started increasing at lower age in women than in men, suggesting that interpretation of FENO levels in adults aged over 50 years should take into account age and sex.
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4.
  • Torén, Kjell, 1952, et al. (författare)
  • Vital capacity and COPD: the Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImage Study (SCAPIS)
  • 2016
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. - : Dove Press. - 1178-2005 .- 1176-9106. ; 11:1, s. 927-933
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Spirometric diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/vital capacity (VC), either as a fixed value <0.7 or below the lower limit of normal (LLN). Forced vital capacity (FVC) is a proxy for VC. The first aim was to compare the use of FVC and VC, assessed as the highest value of FVC or slow vital capacity (SVC), when assessing the FEV1/VC ratio in a general population setting. The second aim was to evaluate the characteristics of subjects with COPD who obtained a higher SVC than FVC. Methods: Subjects (n=1,050) aged 50-64 years were investigated with FEV1, FVC, and SVC after bronchodilation. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) COPDFVC was defined as FEV1/FVC <0.7, GOLDCOPD(VC) as FEV1/VC <0.7 using the maximum value of FVC or SVC, LLNCOPDFVC as FEV1/FVC below the LLN, and LLNCOPDVC as FEV1/VC below the LLN using the maximum value of FVC or SVC. Results: Prevalence of GOLDCOPD(FVC) was 10.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.2-12.0) and the prevalence of LLNCOPDFVC was 9.5% (95% CI 7.8-11.4). When estimates were based on VC, the prevalence became higher; 16.4% (95% CI 14.3-18.9) and 15.6% (95% CI 13.5-17.9) for GOLDCOPD(VC) and LLNCOPDVC, respectively. The group of additional subjects classified as having COPD based on VC, had lower FEV1, more wheeze and higher residual volume compared to subjects without any COPD. Conclusion: The prevalence of COPD was significantly higher when the ratio FEV1/VC was calculated using the highest value of SVC or FVC compared with using FVC only. Subjects classified as having COPD when using the VC concept were more obstructive and with indications of air trapping. Hence, the use of only FVC when assessing airflow limitation may result in a considerable under diagnosis of subjects with mild COPD.
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5.
  • Malinovschi, A., et al. (författare)
  • Assessment of Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) reference equations for diffusing capacity in relation to respiratory burden in the Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImage Study (SCAPIS)
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - Lausanne, Switzerland : EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 56:2
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) has recently published international reference values for diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO). Lower limit of normal (LLN), i.e. the 5th percentile, usually defines impaired D-LCO. We examined if the GLI LLN for D-LCO differs from the LLN in a Swedish population of healthy, never-smoking individuals and how any such differences affect identification of subjects with respiratory burden. Spirometry, D-LCO, chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and questionnaires were obtained from the first 15 040 participants, aged 50-64 years, of the Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImage Study (SCAPIS). Both GLI reference values and the lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method were used to define the LLN in asymptomatic never-smokers without respiratory disease (n=4903, of which 2329 were women). Both the median and LLN for D-LCO from SCAPIS were above the median and LLN from the GLI (p<0.05). The prevalence of D-LCO GLI LLN but GLI LLN but GLI LLN and >SCAPIS LLN). No differences were found with regard to physician-diagnosed asthma. The GLI LLN for D-LCO is lower than the estimated LLN in healthy, never-smoking, middle-aged Swedish adults. Individuals with D-LCO above the GLI LLN but below the SCAPIS LLN had, to a larger extent, an increased respiratory burden. This suggests clinical implications for choosing an adequate LLN for studied populations.
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6.
  • Ek, A., et al. (författare)
  • Chronic rhinosinusitis in asthma is a negative predictor of quality of life: results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN survey
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Allergy. - : Wiley-Blackwell. - 0105-4538 .- 1398-9995. ; 68:10, s. 1314-1321
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BackgroundAsthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) both impair quality of life, but the quality-of-life impact of comorbid asthma and CRS is poorly known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of CRS and other relevant factors on quality of life in asthmatic subjects. MethodsThis Swedish cohort (age 17-76years) consists of 605 well-characterized asthmatics with and without CRS, 110 individuals with CRS only, and 226 controls and is part of the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN) survey. The Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mAQLQ), the Euro Quality of Life (EQ-5D) health questionnaire, spirometry, skin prick test (SPT), exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), smell test, and peak nasal inspiratory flow were used. ResultsSubjects having both asthma and CRS have lower mAQLQ scores in all domains (P<0.001) and a lower EQ-5D index value and EQ-5D VAS value (P<0.001) compared to those with asthma only. Asthmatics with CRS have significantly lower FEV1%pred and FVC%pred (88.4 [85.1-91.7] and 99.9 [96.7-103.0], respectively) compared with asthma only (91.9 [90.3-93.4] and 104.0 [102.5-105.5], respectively P<0.05). Multiple regression analysis shows that low asthma quality of life is associated with having CRS (P<0.0001), lower lung function (P=0.008), current smoking (P=0.01), BMI>30kg/m(2) (P=0.04), high age (P=0.03), and a negative SPT (P=0.04). ConclusionsComorbid CRS was a significant and independent negative predictor of quality of life in asthmatics. Other negative factors were lower lung function, current smoking, obesity, advanced age, and having nonatopic asthma.
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7.
  • Mindus, S., et al. (författare)
  • Asthma and COPD overlap (ACO) is related to a high burden of sleep disturbance and respiratory symptoms: Results from the RHINE and Swedish GA(2)LEN surveys
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Plos One. - : Public Library of Science. - 1932-6203. ; 13:4
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background The term Asthma and COPD Overlap (ACO) describes a condition where asthma and COPD overlap. We aimed to investigate associations between ACO and insomnia and respiratory symptoms, and to investigate the prevalence of ACO and the characteristics of subjects with ACO in two Northern European population studies. The study comprised 25 429 subjects aged >40 years who participated in one of two Northern European general population surveys. Both surveys included questions on asthma, COPD, respiratory and sleep-related symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early-morning awakening, and excessive daytime sleepiness. ACO was defined as having both self-reported asthma and COPD. The prevalence of ACO was 1.0%. The group with ACO had a higher prevalence of both insomnia and respiratory symptoms than subjects with only asthma or COPD. Having ACO was independently associated with a 2-3 times higher probability of having sleep-related symptoms as compared with the group without asthma or COPD, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, smoking history and educational level (adjusted odds ratio 2.14-3.36, 95% CI). Subjects with ACO have a high prevalence of insomnia and respiratory symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the association between sleep-related symptoms and ACO.
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8.
  • Accordini, S., et al. (författare)
  • A three-generation study on the association of tobacco smoking with asthma
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Epidemiology. - : Oxford University Press. - 0300-5771 .- 1464-3685. ; 47:4, s. 1106-1117
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Mothers' smoking during pregnancy increases asthma risk in their offspring. There is some evidence that grandmothers' smoking may have a similar effect, and biological plausibility that fathers' smoking during adolescence may influence offspring's health through transmittable epigenetic changes in sperm precursor cells. We evaluated the three-generation associations of tobacco smoking with asthma. Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, at the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III clinical interview, 2233 mothers and 1964 fathers from 26 centres reported whether their offspring (aged <= 51 years) had ever had asthma and whether it had coexisted with nasal allergies or not. Mothers and fathers also provided information on their parents' (grandparents) and their own asthma, education and smoking history. Multilevel mediation models within a multicentre three-generation framework were fitted separately within the maternal (4666 offspring) and paternal (4192 offspring) lines. Results: Fathers' smoking before they were 15 [relative risk ratio (RRR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01-2.01] and mothers' smoking during pregnancy (RRR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.01-1.59) were associated with asthma without nasal allergies in their offspring. Grandmothers' smoking during pregnancy was associated with asthma in their daughters [odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.17-2.06] and with asthma with nasal allergies in their grandchildren within the maternal line (RRR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.02-1.55). Conclusions: Fathers' smoking during early adolescence and grandmothers' and mothers' smoking during pregnancy may independently increase asthma risk in offspring. Thus, risk factors for asthma should be sought in both parents and before conception.
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9.
  • Janson, C., et al. (författare)
  • Bronchodilator reversibility in asthma and COPD: findings from three large population studies
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - : EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 54:3
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Bronchodilator response (BDR) testing is used as a diagnostic method in obstructive airway diseases. The aim of this investigation was to compare different methods for measuring BDR in participants with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to study to the extent to which BDR was related to symptom burden and phenotypic characteristics. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured before and 15 min after 200 mu g of salbutamol in 35 628 subjects aged >= 16 years from three large international population studies. The subjects were categorised in three groups: current asthma (n=2833), COPD (n=1146) and no airway disease (n=31 649). Three definitions for flow-related reversibility (increase in FEV1) and three for volume-related reversibility (increase in FVC) were used. The prevalence of bronchodilator reversibility expressed as increase FEV1 >= 12% and 200 mL was 17.3% and 18.4% in participants with asthma and COPD, respectively, while the corresponding prevalence was 5.1% in those with no airway disease. In asthma, bronchodilator reversibility was associated with wheeze (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.04-1.79), atopy (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.04-1.79) and higher exhaled nitric oxide fraction, while in COPD neither flow- nor volume-related bronchodilator reversibility was associated with symptom burden, exacerbations or health status after adjusting for pre-bronchodilator FEV1. Bronchodilator reversibility was at least as common in participants with COPD as those with asthma. This indicates that measures of reversibility are of limited value for distinguishing asthma from COPD in population studies. However, in asthma, bronchodilator reversibility may be a phenotypic marker.
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10.
  • Jerning, C., et al. (författare)
  • Asthma and physical activity - A population based study results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN survey
  • 2013
  • Ingår i: Respiratory Medicine. - 0954-6111 .- 1532-3064. ; 107:11, s. 1651-1658
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Having asthma has in previous reports been related to a lower physical activity level. At the same time the prevalence of asthma among elite athletes is high. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity level and asthma. Methods: A postal questionnaire was completed by 25,610 individuals in Sweden. Current asthma was defined as having had an asthma attack during the last 12 months or current use of asthma medication. The participants were asked how often and for how many hours a week they were physically active. Results: In the population 1830 subjects (7.1%) had current asthma. There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects that reported being inactive or slightly physically active between asthmatic and non-asthmatics (57 vs. 58%) while the proportion of subjects that were vigorously physically active (>= 2 times a week and >= 7 h per week) was higher among the subjects with asthma (6.7 vs. 4.8%, p < 0.0001). Being vigorously physically active was independently related to current asthma (OR (95% CI)) 1.40 (1.11-1.77)), wheeze (1.39 (1.17-1.65)), wheeze and breathlessness (1.68 (1.38-2.04)), and wheezing without having a cold (1.39 (1.13-1.71)). The association between being vigorously physically active and wheeze was significantly stronger in women compared to men. Conclusions: There was no difference in the proportion of subjects with a reported low level of physical activity between asthmatics and non-asthmatics. Health care professionals should, however, be aware of the increased prevalence of asthma and asthma-related symptoms in vigorously physically active subjects. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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