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Sökning: WFRF:(Zock Jan Paul)

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1.
  • Kogevinas, Manolis, et al. (författare)
  • Exposure to substances in the workplace and new-onset asthma : an international prospective population-based study (ECRHS-II)
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: The Lancet. - 0140-6736 .- 1474-547X. ; 370:9584, s. 336-341
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background The role of exposure to substances in the workplace in new-onset asthma is not well characterised in population-based studies. We therefore aimed to estimate the relative and attributable risks of new-onset asthma in relation to occupations, work-related exposures, and inhalation accidents. Methods We studied prospectively 6837 participants from 13 countries who previously took part in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (1990-95) and did not report respiratory symptoms or a history of asthma at the time of the first study. Asthma was assessed by methacholine challenge test and by questionnaire data on asthma symptoms. Exposures were defined by high-risk occupations, an asthma-specific job exposure matrix with additional expert judgment, and through self-report of acute inhalation events. Relative risks for new onset asthma were calculated with log-binomial models adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and study Centre. Findings A significant excess asthma risk was seen after exposure to substances known to cause occupational asthma (Relative risk=1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.3, p=0.017). Risks were highest for asthma defined by bronchial hyper-reactivity in addition to symptoms (2.4,1.3-4.6, p=0.008). Of common occupations, a significant excess risk of asthma was seen for nursing (2.2,1.3-4.0, p=0.007). Asthma risk was also increased in participants who reported an acute symptomatic inhalation event such as fire, mixing cleaning products, or chemical spills (RR=3.3, 95% CI 1.0-11.1, p=0.051). The population-attributable risk for adult asthma due to occupational exposures ranged from 10% to 25%, equivalent to an incidence of new-onset occupational asthma of 250-300 cases per million people per year. Interpretation Occupational exposures account for a substantial proportion of adult asthma incidence. The increased risk of asthma after inhalation accidents suggests that workers who have such accidents should be monitored closely.
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2.
  • Le Moual, Nicole, et al. (författare)
  • Occupational exposures and uncontrolled adult-onset asthma in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: European Respiratory Journal. - 0903-1936 .- 1399-3003. ; 43:2, s. 374-386
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Occupational exposure is a well-recognised modifiable risk factor for asthma, but the relationship between occupational exposure and asthma control has not been studied. We aimed to study this association among working-age adults from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Data were available for 7077 participants (mean age 43 years, 45% never-smokers, 5867 without asthma and 1210 with current asthma). Associations between occupational exposure to specific asthmagens and asthma control status (33% with uncontrolled asthma, based on the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines) were evaluated using logistic and multinomial regressions, adjusted for age, sex and smoking status, with study areas included as a random effect. Statistically significant positive associations were observed between uncontrolled adult-onset asthma and both past 12-month and 10-year exposure to any occupational asthmagens (OR (95% CI) 1.6 (1.0-2.40) and 1.7 (1.2-2.5), respectively); high (1.7 (1.0-2.8) and 1.9 (1.3-2.9), respectively) and low (1.6 (1.0-2.7) and 1.8 (1.2-2.7), respectively) molecular weight agents; and cleaning agents (2.0 (1.1-3.6) and 2.3 (1.4-3.6), respectively), with stronger associations for long-term exposures. These associations were mainly explained by the exacerbation domain of asthma control and no associations were observed between asthmagens and partly controlled asthma. These findings suggest that occupational exposure to asthmagens is associated with uncontrolled adult-onset asthma. Occupational risk factors should be quickly identified to prevent uncontrolled asthma.
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3.
  • Mirabelli, Maria C, et al. (författare)
  • Occupational risk factors for asthma among nurses and related healthcare professionals in an international study
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. - 1351-0711 .- 1470-7926. ; 64:7, s. 474-479
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective: The authors examined the relations between self-reported work tasks, use of cleaning products and latex glove use with new-onset asthma among nurses and other healthcare workers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS II). Methods: In a random population sample of adults from 22 European sites, 332 participants reported working in nursing and other related healthcare jobs during the nine-year ECRHS II follow-up period and responded to a supplemental questionnaire about their principal work settings, occupational tasks, products used at work and respiratory symptoms. Poisson regression models with robust error variances were used to compare the risk of new-onset asthma among healthcare workers with each exposure to that of respondents who reported professional or administrative occupations during the entire follow-up period (n=2481). Results: Twenty (6%) healthcare workers and 131 (5%) members of the referent population reported new-onset asthma. Compared to the referent group, the authors observed increased risks among hospital technicians (RR 4.63; 95% Cl 1.87 to 11.5) and among those using ammonia and/or bleach at work (RR 2.16; 95% Cl 1.03 to 4.53). Conclusions: In the ECRHS II cohort, hospital technicians and other healthcare workers experience increased risks of new-onset current asthma, possibly due to specific products used at work.
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4.
  • Zock, Jan-Paul, et al. (författare)
  • Domestic use of hypochlorite bleach, atopic sensitization, and respiratory symptoms in adults.
  • 2009
  • Ingår i: The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology. - 1097-6825 .- 0091-6749. ; 124:4, s. 731-738.e1
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND: Professional use of hypochlorite (bleach) has been associated with respiratory symptoms. Bleach is capable of inactivating allergens, and there are indications that its domestic use may reduce the risk of allergies in children. OBJECTIVE: To study the associations between household use of bleach and atopic sensitization, allergic diseases, and respiratory health status in adults. METHODS: We identified 3626 participants of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II in 10 countries who did the cleaning in their homes and for whom data on specific serum IgE to 4 environmental allergens were available. Frequency of bleach use and information on respiratory symptoms were obtained in face-to-face interviews. House dust mite and cat allergens in mattress dust were measured in a subsample. Associations between the frequency of bleach use and health outcomes were evaluated by using multivariable mixed logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The use of bleach was associated with less atopic sensitization (odds ratio [OR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.63-0.89). This association was apparent for specific IgE to both indoor (cat) and outdoor (grass) allergens, and was consistent in various subgroups, including those without any history of respiratory problems (OR, 0.85). Dose-response relationships (P < .05) were apparent for the frequency of bleach use and sensitization rates. Lower respiratory tract symptoms, but not allergic symptoms, were more prevalent among those using bleach 4 or more days per week (OR, 1.24-1.49). The use of bleach was not associated with indoor allergen concentrations. CONCLUSION: People who clean their homes with hypochlorite bleach are less likely to be atopic but more likely to have respiratory symptoms.
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5.
  • Amaral, Andre F. S., et al. (författare)
  • Interaction between gas cooking and GSTM1 null genotype in bronchial responsiveness : results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey
  • 2014
  • Ingår i: Thorax. - 0040-6376 .- 1468-3296. ; 69:6, s. 558-564
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background Increased bronchial responsiveness is characteristic of asthma. Gas cooking, which is a major indoor source of the highly oxidant nitrogen dioxide, has been associated with respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function. However, little is known about the effect of gas cooking on bronchial responsiveness and on how this relationship may be modified by variants in the genes GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1, which influence antioxidant defences. Methods The study was performed in subjects with forced expiratory volume in one second at least 70% of predicted who took part in the multicentre European Community Respiratory Health Survey, had bronchial responsiveness assessed by methacholine challenge and had been genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1-rs1695. Information on the use of gas for cooking was obtained from interviewer-led questionnaires. Effect modification by genotype on the association between the use of gas for cooking and bronchial responsiveness was assessed within each participating country, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. Results Overall, gas cooking, as compared with cooking with electricity, was not associated with bronchial responsiveness (beta=-0.08, 95% CI -0.40 to 0.25, p=0.648). However, GSTM1 significantly modified this effect (beta for interaction=-0.75, 95% CI - 1.16 to -0.33, p=4x10(-4)), with GSTM1 null subjects showing more responsiveness if they cooked with gas. No effect modification by GSTT1 or GSTP1-rs1695 genotypes was observed. Conclusions Increased bronchial responsiveness was associated with gas cooking among subjects with the GSTM1 null genotype. This may reflect the oxidant effects on the bronchi of exposure to nitrogen dioxide.
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6.
  • Chen, Chih-Mei, et al. (författare)
  • Is There a Threshold Concentration of Cat Allergen Exposure on Respiratory Symptoms in Adults?
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: PLOS ONE. - 1932-6203. ; 10:6
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background and Objective Cat allergen concentrations higher than 8 mu g/g in settled house dust, have been suggested to provoke exacerbation of allergic respiratory symptoms. However, whether the 8 mu g/g of indoor cat allergen concentration is indeed the minimal exposure required for triggering the asthma related respiratory symptoms or the development of sensitization has not yet been confirmed. We studied the associations between domestic cat allergen concentrations and allergic symptoms in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II, with the aim of confirming this suggested threshold. Methods Cat allergen concentrations were measured in the mattress dust of 3003 participants from 22 study centres. Levels of specific immunoglobulin E to cat allergens were measured in serum samples using an immunoassay. Information on allergic symptoms, medication use, home environment and smoking was obtained from a face-to-face interview. Results Domestic cat allergen concentrations were not associated with allergic/asthmatic symptoms in the entire study population, nor in the subset sensitized to cat allergen. We also found no association among individuals exposed to concentrations higher than 8 mu g/g. However, exposure to medium cat allergen concentrations (0.24-0.63 mu g/g) was positively associated with reported asthmatic respiratory symptoms in subjects who have experienced allergic symptoms when near animals. Conclusions The proposed 8 mu g/g threshold of cat allergen concentrations for the exacerbation of allergic/respiratory symptoms was not confirmed in a general European adult population. Potential biases attributable to avoidance behaviours and an imprecise exposure assessment cannot be excluded.
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7.
  • Chinn, Susan, et al. (författare)
  • Bronchial responsiveness in atopic adults increases with exposure to cat allergen
  • 2007
  • Ingår i: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. - 1073-449X .- 1535-4970. ; 176:1, s. 20-26
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Rationale: The association of asthma with sensitization and allergen exposure is known to be complex. There have been few studies of bronchial responsiveness in relation to both risk factors in adults. Objectives: To determine the relation of bronchial responsiveness to allergen exposure and IgE sensitization in a community study taking into account the major determinants of bronchial responsiveness in adulthood. Methods: Cross-sectional data were drawn from 1,884 participants in 20 centers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey follow-up, which included measurement of house dust mite and cat allergen in mattress dust samples, and IgE sensitization to four allergens. Bronchial responsiveness to methacholine was expressed as a continuous variable, and analyzed by multiple regression. Measurements and Main Results: The trend toward greater bronchial responsiveness with increasing exposure to cat allergen was greater in those sensitized to any of the four allergens than those not sensitized (p = 0.001); there was no significant interaction between cat sensitization and Fel d 1 exposure. No trend was found with house dust mite allergen exposure. The difference in bronchial responsiveness between those exposed to the highest levels compared with the lowest was approximately –2.02 doubling doses of PD20 (95% confidence interval, –3.06 to –0.97), and nearly as great in those exposed to more moderate levels. Conclusions: Cat allergen exposure at moderate levels may be harmful to all atopic adults. The clinical implication is that it is insufficient to test patients with asthma for cat sensitization; all atopic individuals may benefit from reduced cat exposure.
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8.
  • Flexeder, Claudia, et al. (författare)
  • Second-hand smoke exposure in adulthood and lower respiratory health during 20 year follow up in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Respiratory Research. - : BioMed Central. - 1465-9921 .- 1465-993X. ; 20
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Early life exposure to tobacco smoke has been extensively studied but the role of second-hand smoke (SHS) for new-onset respiratory symptoms and lung function decline in adulthood has not been widely investigated in longitudinal studies. Our aim is to investigate the associations of exposure to SHS in adults with respiratory symptoms, respiratory conditions and lung function over 20 years. We used information from 3011 adults from 26 centres in 12 countries who participated in the European Community Respiratory Health Surveys I-III and were never or former smokers at all three surveys. Associations of SHS exposure with respiratory health (asthma symptom score, asthma, chronic bronchitis, COPD) were analysed using generalised linear mixed-effects models adjusted for confounding factors (including sex, age, smoking status, socioeconomic status and allergic sensitisation). Linear mixed-effects models with additional adjustment for height were used to assess the relationships between SHS exposure and lung function levels and decline. Reported exposure to SHS decreased in all 26 study centres over time. The prevalence of SHS exposure was 38.7% at baseline (1990-1994) and 7.1% after the 20-year follow-up (2008-2011). On average 2.4% of the study participants were not exposed at the first, but were exposed at the third examination. An increase in SHS exposure over time was associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma (odds ratio (OR): 2.7; 95% confidence interval (95%-CI): 1.2-5.9), chronic bronchitis (OR: 4.8; 95%-CI: 1.6-15.0), asthma symptom score (count ratio (CR): 1.9; 95%-CI: 1.2-2.9) and dyspnoea (OR: 2.7; 95%-CI: 1.1-6.7) compared to never exposed to SHS. Associations between increase in SHS exposure and incidence of COPD (OR: 2.0; 95%-CI: 0.6-6.0) or lung function (beta: - 49 ml; 95%-CI: -132, 35 for FEV1 and beta: - 62 ml; 95%-CI: -165, 40 for FVC) were not apparent. Exposure to second-hand smoke may lead to respiratory symptoms, but this is not accompanied by lung function changes.
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9.
  • Heinrich, Joachim, et al. (författare)
  • Cat allergen level : its determinants and relationship to specific IgE to cat across European centers
  • 2006
  • Ingår i: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. - 0091-6749 .- 1097-6825. ; 118:3, s. 674-681
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Background: Cat allergen level in settled house dust and its determinants in Europe are unknown. Objective: The aim of this study is to quantify the level of cat allergens in mattress dust, to study its determinants, and to analyze the relationship with cat specific IgE on community level across European centers. Methods: Trained field workers collected dust from approximately 3000 mattresses during home visits in 22 European Community Respiratory Health Survey II centers. Sieved dust extracts were assayed for cat allergen using a mAb ELISA assay. Results: The overall geometric mean cat allergen was 0.94 mu g/g, ranging from 0.12 mu g/g in Huelva, Spain, to 3.76 mu g/g in Antwerp, Belgium. Current cat owners' homes showed substantially higher levels than past cat owners' and never cat owners' homes (geometric mean and 95% CI, 61.4 mu g/g [48.4-77.9] vs 1.37 mu g/g [0.97-1.9] vs 0.29 mu g/g [0.27-0.31]x). Community prevalence of cat ownership was moderately correlated with cat allergen levels in noncat owners (r(s) = 0.50), but not for past or current cat owners. The multilevel model identified community prevalence of cat keeping as the only statistically significant determinant of mattress cat allergen levels for noncat owners. However, averaged cat allergen levels per center were not related to community prevalence of detectable specific IgE to cat. Conclusion: Not having a cat in the home is associated with substantially lower Fel d 1 concentration, but does not protect against high Fel d 1 exposure in communities where cat ownership is common. Clinical implications: People (including patients with cat allergy) who do not own cats may be exposed to high levels of cat allergen in their home, particularly if they live in communities with high levels of cat ownership.
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