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Sökning: WFRF:(Debette Stephanie) > (2020-2022)

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1.
  • Manry, Jérémy, et al. (författare)
  • The risk of COVID-19 death is much greater and age dependent with type I IFN autoantibodies.
  • 2022
  • Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. - 1091-6490. ; 119:21
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection fatality rate (IFR) doubles with every 5 y of age from childhood onward. Circulating autoantibodies neutralizing IFN-α, IFN-ω, and/or IFN-β are found in ∼20% of deceased patients across age groups, and in ∼1% of individuals aged <70 y and in >4% of those >70 y old in the general population. With a sample of 1,261 unvaccinated deceased patients and 34,159 individuals of the general population sampled before the pandemic, we estimated both IFR and relative risk of death (RRD) across age groups for individuals carrying autoantibodies neutralizing type I IFNs, relative to noncarriers. The RRD associated with any combination of autoantibodies was higher in subjects under 70 y old. For autoantibodies neutralizing IFN-α2 or IFN-ω, the RRDs were 17.0 (95% CI: 11.7 to 24.7) and 5.8 (4.5 to 7.4) for individuals <70 y and ≥70 y old, respectively, whereas, for autoantibodies neutralizing both molecules, the RRDs were 188.3 (44.8 to 774.4) and 7.2 (5.0 to 10.3), respectively. In contrast, IFRs increased with age, ranging from 0.17% (0.12 to 0.31) for individuals <40 y old to 26.7% (20.3 to 35.2) for those ≥80 y old for autoantibodies neutralizing IFN-α2 or IFN-ω, and from 0.84% (0.31 to 8.28) to 40.5% (27.82 to 61.20) for autoantibodies neutralizing both. Autoantibodies against type I IFNs increase IFRs, and are associated with high RRDs, especially when neutralizing both IFN-α2 and IFN-ω. Remarkably, IFRs increase with age, whereas RRDs decrease with age. Autoimmunity to type I IFNs is a strong and common predictor of COVID-19 death.
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2.
  • Jacob, Mina A, et al. (författare)
  • Global Differences in Risk Factors, Etiology, and Outcome of Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults: A Worldwide Meta-analysis: The GOAL-Initiative.
  • 2022
  • Ingår i: Neurology. - 1526-632X. ; 98:6, s. e573-e588
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • There is a worldwide increase in the incidence of stroke in young adults, with major regional and ethnic differences. Advancing knowledge of ethnic and regional variation in causes and outcomes will be beneficial in implementation of regional healthcare services. To study the global distribution of risk factors, causes and 3-month mortality of young ischemic stroke patients, by performing a patient data meta-analysis form different cohorts worldwide.We did a pooled analysis of individual patient data from cohort studies which included consecutive ischemic stroke patients aged 18-50 years. We studied differences in prevalence of risk factors and causes between different ethnic and racial groups, geographic regions and countries with different income levels. We investigated differences in 3-month mortality by mixed-effects multivariable logistic regression.We included 17,663 patients from 32 cohorts in 29 countries. Hypertension and diabetes were most prevalent in Blacks (hypertension, 52.1%; diabetes, 20.7%) and Asians (hypertension 46.1%, diabetes, 20.9%). Large vessel atherosclerosis and small vessel disease were more often cause of stroke in high-income countries (HICs; both p<0.001), whereas ''other determined stroke'' and ''undetermined stroke'' were higher in low and middle-income countries (LMICs; both p<0.001). Patients in LMICs were younger, had less vascular risk factors, and despite this, more often died within 3 months than those from HICs (OR 2.49; 95% CI 1.42-4.36).The ethnoracial and regional differences in risk factors and causes of stroke at young age provide an understanding of ethnic and racial, and regional differences in incidence of ischemic stroke. Our results also visualize the dissimilarities in outcome after stroke in young adults that exist between LMICs and HICs, which should serve as call to action to improve healthcare facilities in LMICs.
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3.
  • Lee, Crystal, et al. (författare)
  • Association of anthropometry and weight change with risk of dementia and its major subtypes: a meta-analysis consisting 2.8 million adults with 57,294 cases of dementia
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Obesity Reviews. - 1467-7881 .- 1467-789X. ; 21:4
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Uncertainty exists regarding the relation of body size and weight change with dementia risk. As populations continue to age and the global obesity epidemic shows no sign of waning, reliable quantification of such associations is important. We examined the relationship of body mass index, waist circumference, and annual percent weight change with risk of dementia and its subtypes by pooling data from 19 prospective cohort studies and four clinical trials using meta-analysis. Compared with body mass index-defined lower-normal weight (18.5–22.4 kg/m2), the risk of all-cause dementia was higher among underweight individuals but lower among those with upper-normal (22.5–24.9 kg/m2) levels. Obesity was associated with higher risk in vascular dementia. Similarly, relative to the lowest fifth of waist circumference, those in the highest fifth had non-significant higher vascular dementia risk. Weight loss was associated with higher all-cause dementia risk relative to weight maintenance. Weight gain was weakly associated with higher vascular dementia risk. The relationship between body size, weight change and dementia is complex and exhibits nonlinear associations depending on dementia subtype under scrutiny. Weight loss was associated with an elevated risk most likely due to reverse causality and/or pathophysiological changes in the brain, although the latter remains speculative.
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4.
  • Traenka, Christopher, et al. (författare)
  • Artery occlusion independently predicts unfavorable outcome in cervical artery dissection.
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Neurology. - 1526-632X. ; 94:2
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • To assess the impact of dissected artery occlusion (DAO) on functional outcome and complications in patients with cervical artery dissection (CeAD).We analyzed combined individual patient data from 3 multicenter cohorts of consecutive patients with CeAD (the Cervical Artery Dissection and Ischemic Stroke Patients [CADISP]-Plus consortium dataset). Patients with data on DAO and functional outcome were included. We compared patients with DAO to those without DAO. Primary outcome was favorable functional outcome (i.e., modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score 0-1) measured 3-6 months from baseline. Secondary outcomes included delayed cerebral ischemia, major hemorrhage, recurrent CeAD, and death. We performed univariate and multivariable binary logistic regression analyses and calculated odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), with adjustment for potential confounders.Of 2,148 patients (median age 45 years [interquartile range (IQR) 38-52], 43.6% women), 728 (33.9%) had DAO. Patients with DAO more frequently presented with cerebral ischemia (84.6% vs 58.5%, p < 0.001). Patients with DAO were less likely to have favorable outcome when compared to patients without DAO (mRS 0-1: 59.6% vs 80.1%, punadjusted < 0.001). After adjustment for age, sex, and initial stroke severity, DAO was independently associated with less favorable outcome (mRS 0-1: OR 0.65, CI 0.50-0.84, p = 0.001). Delayed cerebral ischemia occurred more frequently in patients with DAO than in patients without DAO (4.5% vs 2.9%, p = 0.059).DAO independently predicts less favorable functional outcome in patients with CeAD. Further research on vessel patency, collateral status and effects of revascularization therapies particularly in patients with DAO is warranted.
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5.
  • Wardlaw, Joanna M., et al. (författare)
  • ESO Guideline on covert cerebral small vessel disease
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: European Stroke Journal. - : SAGE Publications. - 2396-9873. ; 6:2
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • ‘Covert’ cerebral small vessel disease (ccSVD) is common on neuroimaging in persons without overt neurological manifestations, and increases the risk of future stroke, cognitive impairment, dependency, and death. These European Stroke Organisation (ESO) guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations to assist with clinical decisions about management of ccSVD, specifically white matter hyperintensities and lacunes, to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. The guidelines were developed according to ESO standard operating procedures and Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. We prioritised the clinical outcomes of stroke, cognitive decline or dementia, dependency, death, mobility and mood disorders, and interventions of blood pressure lowering, antiplatelet drugs, lipid lowering, lifestyle modifications, glucose lowering and conventional treatments for dementia. We systematically reviewed the literature, assessed the evidence, formulated evidence-based recommendations where feasible, and expert consensus statements. We found little direct evidence, mostly of low quality. We recommend patients with ccSVD and hypertension to have their blood pressure well controlled; lower blood pressure targets may reduce ccSVD progression. We do not recommend antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin in ccSVD. We found little evidence on lipid lowering in ccSVD. Smoking cessation is a health priority. We recommend regular exercise which may benefit cognition, and a healthy diet, good sleep habits, avoiding obesity and stress for general health reasons. In ccSVD, we found no evidence for glucose control in the absence of diabetes or for conventional Alzheimer dementia treatments. Randomised controlled trials with clinical endpoints are a priority for ccSVD.
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6.
  • Wolters, Frank J, et al. (författare)
  • Twenty-seven-year time trends in dementia incidence in Europe and the United States: The Alzheimer Cohorts Consortium.
  • 2020
  • Ingår i: Neurology. - 1526-632X. ; 95:5, s. e519-e531
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • To determine changes in the incidence of dementia between 1988 and 2015.This analysis was performed in aggregated data from individuals >65 years of age in 7 population-based cohort studies in the United States and Europe from the Alzheimer Cohort Consortium. First, we calculated age- and sex-specific incidence rates for all-cause dementia, and then defined nonoverlapping 5-year epochs within each study to determine trends in incidence. Estimates of change per 10-year interval were pooled and results are presented combined and stratified by sex.Of 49,202 individuals, 4,253 (8.6%) developed dementia. The incidence rate of dementia increased with age, similarly for women and men, ranging from about 4 per 1,000 person-years in individuals aged 65-69 years to 65 per 1,000 person-years for those aged 85-89 years. The incidence rate of dementia declined by 13% per calendar decade (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-19%), consistently across studies, and somewhat more pronouncedly in men than in women (24% [95% CI 14%-32%] vs 8% [0%-15%]).The incidence rate of dementia in Europe and North America has declined by 13% per decade over the past 25 years, consistently across studies. Incidence is similar for men and women, although declines were somewhat more profound in men. These observations call for sustained efforts to finding the causes for this decline, as well as determining their validity in geographically and ethnically diverse populations.
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