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Sökning: WFRF:(Ebmeier Klaus P) > (2021)

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1.
  • Fjell, Anders M., et al. (författare)
  • Poor Self-Reported Sleep is Related to Regional Cortical Thinning in Aging but not Memory Decline-Results From the Lifebrain Consortium
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Cerebral Cortex. - : Oxford University Press. - 1047-3211 .- 1460-2199. ; 31:4, s. 1953-1969
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • We examined whether sleep quality and quantity are associated with cortical and memory changes in cognitively healthy participants across the adult lifespan. Associations between self-reported sleep parameters (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, PSQI) and longitudinal cortical change were tested using five samples from the Lifebrain consortium (n = 2205, 4363 MRIs, 18-92 years). In additional analyses, we tested coherence with cell-specific gene expression maps from the Allen Human Brain Atlas, and relations to changes in memory performance. "PSQI # 1 Subjective sleep quality" and "PSQI #5 Sleep disturbances" were related to thinning of the right lateral temporal cortex, with lower quality and more disturbances being associated with faster thinning. The association with "PSQI #5 Sleep disturbances" emerged after 60 years, especially in regions with high expression of genes related to oligodendrocytes and S1 pyramidal neurons. None of the sleep scales were related to a longitudinal change in episodic memory function, suggesting that sleep-related cortical changes were independent of cognitive decline. The relationship to cortical brain change suggests that self-reported sleep parameters are relevant in lifespan studies, but small effect sizes indicate that self-reported sleep is not a good biomarker of general cortical degeneration in healthy older adults.
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2.
  • Grydeland, Håkon, et al. (författare)
  • Self-reported sleep relates to microstructural hippocampal decline in beta-amyloid positive Adults beyond genetic risk
  • 2021
  • Ingår i: Sleep. - : Oxford University Press. - 0161-8105 .- 1550-9109. ; 44:11
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Study Objectives: A critical role linking sleep with memory decay and beta-amyloid (A beta) accumulation, two markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, may be played by hippocampal integrity. We tested the hypotheses that worse self-reported sleep relates to decline in memory and intra-hippocampal microstructure, including in the presence of A beta.Methods: Two-hundred and forty-three cognitively healthy participants, aged 19-81 years, completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index once, and two diffusion tensor imaging sessions, on average 3 years apart, allowing measures of decline in intra-hippocampal microstructure as indexed by increased mean diffusivity. We measured memory decay at each imaging session using verbal delayed recall. One session of positron emission tomography, in 108 participants above 44 years of age, yielded 23 A beta positive. Genotyping enabled control for APOE epsilon 4 status, and polygenic scores for sleep and AD, respectively.Results: Worse global sleep quality and sleep efficiency related to more rapid reduction of hippocampal microstructure over time. Focusing on efficiency (the percentage of time in bed at night spent asleep), the relation was stronger in presence of A beta accumulation, and hippocampal integrity decline mediated the relation with memory decay. The results were not explained by genetic risk for sleep efficiency or AD.Conclusions: Worse sleep efficiency related to decline in hippocampal microstructure, especially in the presence of A beta accumulation, and A beta might link poor sleep and memory decay. As genetic risk did not account for the associations, poor sleep efficiency might constitute a risk marker for AD, although the driving causal mechanisms remain unknown.
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