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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Pantoni L) srt2:(2005-2009);srt2:(2008)"

Sökning: WFRF:(Pantoni L) > (2005-2009) > (2008)

  • Resultat 1-7 av 7
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1.
  • Baezner, H, et al. (författare)
  • Association of gait and balance disorders with age-related white matter changes: the LADIS study.
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Neurology. - 1526-632X. ; 70:12, s. 935-42
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: In the Leukoaraiosis and Disability (LADIS) Study, 11 European centers are evaluating the role of age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent determinant of the transition to disability in the elderly (65 to 84 years). We aimed at determining the influence of ARWMC on different objective measures of gait and balance. METHODS: Six hundred thirty-nine nondisabled individuals were prospectively enrolled and are being followed-up for 3 years. Subjects are graded in three standardized categories of ARWMC (mild, moderate, and severe) according to central MRI reading. Quantitative tests of gait and balance include the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; range: 0 [poor] to 12 [normal]), a timed 8-m walk, and a timed single leg stance test. RESULTS: In cross-sectional analysis, deficiencies in gait and balance performance were correlated with the severity of ARWMC (SPPB: 10.2 +/- 2.1 in the mild, 9.9 +/- 2.0 in the moderate, 8.9 +/- 2.6 in the severe group; p < 0.001). Walking speed correlated with the severity of ARWMC (1.24 +/- 0.28 m/second in the mild, 1.18 +/- 0.32 m/second in the moderate, and 1.09 +/- 0.31 m/second in the severe group; p < 0.001). Balance was best in individuals with mild ARWMC (single leg stance time: 18.9 +/- 10.8 seconds) compared with moderate and severe ARWMC (16.4 +/- 10.8 and 13.6 +/- 11.2 seconds) (p < 0.001). Physically inactive individuals had a higher risk of a pathologic SPPB score (moderate vs mild ARWMC: odds ratio 1.60, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.52; severe vs mild ARWMC: odds ratio 1.75, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.80). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support a strong association between the severity of age-related white matter changes and the severity of gait and motor compromise. Physical activity might have the potential to reduce the risk of limitations in mobility.
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2.
  • Miranda, B, et al. (författare)
  • Self-perceived memory impairment and cognitive performance in an elderly independent population with age-related white matter changes.
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry. - 1468-330X. ; 79:8, s. 869-73
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVES: To determine whether self-perceived memory impairment is associated with the severity of white matter changes (WMC) and is related to cognitive impairment. METHODS: Data were drawn from the multinational Leukoaraiosis and Disability Study (LADIS), which investigates the impact of WMC on global functioning. WMC severity was rated using the Fazekas scale. Medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) was scored visually and mean values were calculated. The neuropsychological battery consisted of the Mini-Mental State Examination, a modified version of the VADAS-Cog, Trail making and Stroop tests. A question about self-perceived memory impairment was used as a measure for presence of memory complaints. Cognitive performance was analysed test-by-test and in three main domains: memory, executive functions and speed/motor control. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was used as a measure of depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Six hundred and thirty-eight subjects were included in this study. No association was found between memory complaints and the severity of WMC. Subjects with memory complaints (n = 399) had a higher GDS score [t((637)) = -7.15; p<0.02] and performed worse on almost all cognitive tests and on the three cognitive domains. Multiple linear regression showed that the worse performance on the memory domain was associated with memory complaints independently of depressive symptoms, WMC severity and MTA (R(2) = 0.183; F = 17.09, beta = -0.126; p<0.05). CONCLUSION: In a sample of non-disabled elderly subjects with WMC, self-perceived memory impairment is significantly associated with objective memory impairment independently of the WMC severity, depressive symptoms and MTA.
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3.
  • Ryberg, C, et al. (författare)
  • White matter changes contribute to corpus callosum atrophy in the elderly: the LADIS study.
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology. - 1936-959X. ; 29:8, s. 1498-504
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The corpus callosum (CC) is the most important structure involved in the transmission of interhemispheric information. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential correlation between regional age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) and atrophy of CC in elderly subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 578 subjects with ARWMC from the Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) study, the cross-sectional area of the CC was automatically segmented on the normalized midsagittal MR imaging section and subdivided into 5 regions. The ARWMC volumes were measured quantitatively by using a semiautomated technique and segmented into 6 brain regions. RESULTS: Significant correlation between the area of the rostrum and splenium regions of the CC and the ARWMC load in most brain regions was identified. This correlation persisted after correction for global atrophy. CONCLUSION: Increasing loads of ARWMC volume were significantly correlated with atrophy of the CC and its subregions in nondisabled elderly subjects with leukoaraiosis. However, the pattern of correlation between CC subregions and ARWMC was not specifically related to the topographic location of ARWMC. The results suggest that ARWMC may lead to a gradual loss of CC tissue.
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6.
  • Olesen, Pernille J, et al. (författare)
  • The predictive value of cerebral ischemic lesions for dementia
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Vas-Cog, Singapore 14-16 Jan 2009.
  • Konferensbidrag (övrigt vetenskapligt)abstract
    • Background & Objective Changes in white matter are known to be related to dementia and cognitive decline. We examined whether CT-detected white matter lesions (WMLs) predicted dementia or cognitive decline in a population followed for five years. Methods A representative sample of persons aged 70-82 years were examined with a neuropsychiatric examination and a CT scan in 2000-2001 (N=657). A follow-up examination was performed in 2005 (N=503). People without dementia at the time of CT scanning and who participated in the examinations in 2005 were included (N=497). The Wahlund scale was used to define WMLs using a score from 0 (no lesions) to 3 (severe lesions). Cognitive status was assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). The difference in MMSE score from 2000 to 2005 (∆MMSE) was used as a general measure on cognitive decline. Differences in performance on other neuropsychiatric tests were included to get more sensitive measures of change in cognitive function. Regression analyses were applied to analyze whether WMLs could predict the outcome of dementia or cognitive decline five years later. Results Thirty-seven people were diagnosed with dementia in 2005 (7.4%), of these 12 (32%) had any WML of severity >1 on the CT performed five years earlier. For the non-demented group the comparable number was 77 (17%). Significant cognitive decline according to ∆MMSE was seen in the group who were diagnosed with dementia. Preliminary regression analysis shows that cognitive decline and parieto-occipital WMLs predicted onset of dementia. Conclusion The findings suggest that WMLs are weak predictors of dementia. Only WMLs in parieto-occipital areas were related to dementia five years later. Further analyses will show the relation between WMLs and decline in cognitive symptoms.
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7.
  • Simoni, M, et al. (författare)
  • Prevalence of CT-detected cerebral abnormalities in an elderly Swedish population sample.
  • 2008
  • Ingår i: Acta neurologica Scandinavica. - 1600-0404. ; 118:4, s. 260-7
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • OBJECTIVE: To measure the prevalence of computed tomography (CT)-detected cerebral lesions in a population-based sample of elderly persons living in Göteborg, Sweden. METHODS: Cerebral CT-scans were performed in the case of 466 women (mean age 74.3 +/- 5.1 years) and 191 70-year-old men. A single rater assessed white matter lesions (WML) using four different scales, lacunar lesions, large infarcts, cortical atrophy, and basal ganglia calcifications. RESULTS: White matter lesions frequency assessed by different scales ranged between 54.5% and 68.5%. Lacunar lesions were detected in 46.7% (30.1% had lacunes >5 mm) and cerebral infarcts in 3.0% of participants. Overall, 72.8% of participants evidenced cerebral vascular abnormalities. Severe cortical atrophy was more common in temporal (6.4%) and frontal (6.7%) lobes, than in parietal (1.7%) and occipital (1.1%) lobes. Basal ganglia calcifications were found in 38.7% of participants. WML, lacunar lesions, large infarcts, and degree of cortical atrophy correlated positively with age. More lacunes, basal ganglia calcifications, and occipital lobe atrophy were associated with male gender. CONCLUSIONS: Vascular and other brain lesions are very common on CT-scan in an elderly population, but large vascular lesions are rare. This study provides the first reference for the prevalence of CT-detected abnormalities in an elderly Swedish population.
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