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Träfflista för sökning "WFRF:(Pantoni L) srt2:(2015-2019)"

Sökning: WFRF:(Pantoni L) > (2015-2019)

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  • Sweeney, M. D., et al. (författare)
  • Vascular dysfunction-The disregarded partner of Alzheimer's disease
  • 2019
  • Ingår i: Alzheimers & Dementia. - 1552-5260. ; 15:1, s. 158-167
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Increasing evidence recognizes Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a multifactorial and heterogeneous disease with multiple contributors to its pathophysiology, including vascular dysfunction. The recently updated AD Research Framework put forth by the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association describes a biomarker-based pathologic definition of AD focused on amyloid, tau, and neuronal injury. In response to this article, here we first discussed evidence that vascular dysfunction is an important early event in AD pathophysiology. Next, we examined various imaging sequences that could be easily implemented to evaluate different types of vascular dysfunction associated with, and/or contributing to, AD pathophysiology, including changes in blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebral blood flow. Vascular imaging biomarkers of small vessel disease of the brain, which is responsible for >50% of dementia worldwide, including AD, are already established, well characterized, and easy to recognize. We suggest that these vascular biomarkers should be incorporated into the AD Research Framework to gain a better understanding of AD pathophysiology and aid in treatment efforts. (C) 2018 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • Macfarlane, M. D., et al. (författare)
  • Shape abnormalities of the caudate nucleus correlate with poorer gait and balance: Results from a subset of the ladis study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry. - 1064-7481. ; 23:1, s. 59-U90
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • Objective Functional deficits seen in several neurodegenerative disorders have been linked with dysfunction in frontostriatal circuits and with associated shape alterations in striatal structures. The severity of visible white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging has been found to correlate with poorer performance on measures of gait and balance. This study aimed to determine whether striatal volume and shape changes were correlated with gait dysfunction. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging scans and clinical gait/balance data (scores from the Short Physical Performance Battery [SPPB]) were sourced from 66 subjects in the previously published LADIS trial, performed in nondisabled individuals older than age 65 years with WMHs at study entry. Data were obtained at study entry and at 3-year follow-up. Caudate nuclei and putamina were manually traced using a previously published method and volumes calculated. The relationships between volume and physical performance on the SPPB were investigated with shape analysis using the spherical harmonic shape description toolkit. Results There was no correlation between the severity of WMHs and striatal volumes. Caudate nuclei volume correlated with performance on the SPPB at baseline but not at follow-up, with subsequent shape analysis showing left caudate changes occurred in areas corresponding to inputs of the dorsolateral prefrontal, premotor, and motor cortex. There was no correlation between putamen volumes and performance on the SPPB. Conclusion Disruption in frontostriatal circuits may play a role in mediating poorer physical performance in individuals with WMHs. Striatal volume and shape changes may be suitable biomarkers for functional changes in this population. © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.
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  • Frederiksen, K. S., et al. (författare)
  • Physical activity in the elderly is associated with improved executive function and processing speed: the LADIS Study
  • 2015
  • Ingår i: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. - 0885-6230. ; 30:7, s. 744-750
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • ObjectivesPhysical activity reduces the risk of cognitive decline but may affect cognitive domains differently. We examined whether physical activity modifies processing speed, executive function and memory in a population of non-dementia elderly subjects with age-related white matter changes (ARWMC). MethodsData from the Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) study, a multicenter, European prospective cohort study aimed at examining the role of ARWMC in transition to disability, was used. Subjects in the LADIS study were clinically assessed yearly for 3years including MRI at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Physical activity was assessed at baseline, and cognitive compound scores at baseline and 3-year assessment were used. ResultsTwo-hundred-eighty-two subjects (age, y (mean (SD)): 73.1 (5.1); gender (f/m): 164/118); MMSE (mean (SD)): 28.3 (+/- 1.7)) who had not progressed to MCI or dementia, were included. Multiple variable linear regression analysis with baseline MMSE, education, gender, age, stroke, diabetes and ARWMC rating as covariates revealed that physical activity was associated with better scores at baseline and 3-year follow-up for executive function (baseline: : 0.39, 95% CI: 0.13-0.90, p=0.008; follow-up: : 0.24, 95% CI: 0.10-0.38, p=0.001) and processing speed (baseline: : 0.48, 95% CI: 0.14-0.89, p=0.005; follow-up: : 0.15, 95% CI: 0.02-0.29, p=0.02) but not memory. When including baseline cognitive score as a covariate in the analysis of 3-year follow-up scores, executive function remained significant (: 0.11, 95% CI: 0-0.22, p=0.04). ConclusionOur findings confirm previous findings of a positive effect of physical activity on cognitive functions in elderly subjects, and further extends these by showing that the association is also present in patients with ARWMC. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  • van der Flier, W. M., et al. (författare)
  • Vascular cognitive impairment
  • 2018
  • Ingår i: Nature Reviews Disease Primers. - 2056-676X. ; 4
  • Tidskriftsartikel (refereegranskat)abstract
    • The term vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) was introduced around the start of the new millennium and refers to the contribution of vascular pathology to any severity of cognitive impairment, ranging from subjective cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Although vascular pathology is common in elderly individuals with cognitive decline, pure vascular dementia (that is, dementia caused solely by vascular pathology) is uncommon. Indeed, most patients with vascular dementia also have other types of pathology, the most common of which is Alzheimer disease (specifically, the diffuse accumulation of amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of tau). At present, the main treatment for VCI is prevention by treating vascular diseases and other risk factors for VCI, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Despite the current paucity of disease-modifying pharmacological treatments, we foresee that eventually, we might be able to target specific brain diseases to prevent cognitive decline and dementia.
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